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View Full Version : Need New Fundraising Ideas!


hollieteam388
01-22-2004, 09:48 PM
Hello everyone! I was wondering if anyone had any fun, creative ideas for a new fundraiser or mystery theatre? Thanks for your help!! :)

gsensel
01-22-2004, 09:49 PM
http://www.chiefdelphi.com/forums/showthread.php?t=24178

fox46
01-23-2004, 01:30 AM
In the past, our team sold chocolate bars, and first aid kits. It proved very profitable ie: $700.00 CDN. There are actually companies that specialize in supplying similar products for fundraising. Try searching the internet.

mrs. p
01-23-2004, 01:58 PM
Hello everyone! I was wondering if anyone had any fun, creative ideas for a new fundraiser or mystery theatre? Thanks for your help!! :)


hi! will add our 2cents. we do fundraising year round and as of today have raised about 17K. we have a car wash each month (more than that and it gets old real fast). we sell candy. we do gift wrapping at the mall during christmas break. we hooked up with a travel agent who let us sell luncheon/cruise ship tour tickets (we made all of the profit) we hosted a golf tournament. we've done the murder/mystery dinner theater along with our drama dept (they did the acting - we supplied the food - usually donated by a local business) and both groups sold tickets. we give lots of presentations at local civic organizations that usually donate money. this year, a group has asked us to selll 5$ raffle tickets (we keep 4 and they get 1 back) they buy the items and it works for everyone.

hope that helps

mrs. p

Ben.V.293
01-23-2004, 02:42 PM
My team also does fund raisers year round, all of which are very succesfull. Last year we set up a coffee shop in our schools main hallway and sold coffee every wednday. It was very profitable, untill our school's lunchladdies found out about and flipped out because they said it violated their contract with the school (we'll get our revenge!). We also do car washes which are very succesfull. Another fundraiser we do is run robot games at fairs and other events. We use robots from passed years, make up a game, and charge 2 dollars a play. We make tons of money from running games. We also sell coffee mugs. We got custom team 293 coffee mugs and sell them for 12 dollars each. We've sold TONS of them and have made lots of money. We recently used some of our fundraising money to buy a digital read-out for our mill.

hollieteam388
01-23-2004, 03:46 PM
hi! will add our 2cents. we do fundraising year round and as of today have raised about 17K. we have a car wash each month (more than that and it gets old real fast). we sell candy. we do gift wrapping at the mall during christmas break. we hooked up with a travel agent who let us sell luncheon/cruise ship tour tickets (we made all of the profit) we hosted a golf tournament. we've done the murder/mystery dinner theater along with our drama dept (they did the acting - we supplied the food - usually donated by a local business) and both groups sold tickets. we give lots of presentations at local civic organizations that usually donate money. this year, a group has asked us to selll 5$ raffle tickets (we keep 4 and they get 1 back) they buy the items and it works for everyone.

hope that helps

mrs. p



THANKS FOR THE INFORMATION on FUNDRAISING!!! umm... We were wondering what type of murder/mystery theater you did....please send us back some information!!!

THANK YOU :D
Hollie Team 388*-*

mrs. p
01-27-2004, 12:38 PM
THANKS FOR THE INFORMATION on FUNDRAISING!!! umm... We were wondering what type of murder/mystery theater you did....please send us back some information!!!

THANK YOU :D
Hollie Team 388*-*

we've done 3 so far. the first one was very generic (someone stole a part of the robot- we got to show off our robot) but the last 2 were true muder mysteries. the drama dept wrote them (or the teacher found copies to use) we put it on in the cafeteria. all food was donated. we (drama and robotics) each made about 750 per night. if you email (passmorem@brevard.k12.fl.us) i'll look for some of the scripts. send your address

richardp
02-24-2004, 08:40 PM
This kinda works good, so far this year we have made over $200. We had one parent bring in a giant cooler and keeps it stocked with soda cans and ice to keep them really cold. We buy them for 50 cents (which is a really good deal since the vending machine is 60 cents). 25 cents goes toward keeping it filled and the other 25 cents goes to the team.

nicole839
03-23-2004, 03:03 PM
i happened to wander in here browsing around, :] and some of your fundraising ideas sound great. my team only has about 3 really good sponsors, and lets face it it isn't enough. we did manage to get a grant from MIT-Lemlson as an invent team however so we're entering another six-week build right about now. :ahh: i'd rather not have to do that every year however. we do a ziti dinner every month or two, it serves as a fundraiser for the team and lets the community see what we've been up to. candy is kind of tight for us though. the band (which i'm part of too) pretty much dominates, having both hershey's and mars brand candy bars (everthing from skittles and m&m's to twix) and our peer leadership corps does wonka and cadbury candy (gobstoppers, runts, caramelos) what other brands can we look to for testing? :confused:

Jay H 237
03-23-2004, 05:18 PM
Our team has held car washes, sold Tupperware, Avon, bulbs (as in flowers), hold pancake breakfasts and ziti dinners through out the year. We also have held bottle and can drives, take-a-chance raffles, and bake sales. We do this year round, not just the six weeks.

[EDIT] Our team has also held tag sales with donated items and performed can shakes outside local supermarkets. We also sold hometown cards for $10. These cards were good for one year and got the bearer of the card discounts at local stores. The last one I remembered was our first year we held a smash-for-cash. We had a local junkyard donate an intact '85 Buick Century. They delivered it and picked up the remains, or carcus of it, since everyone was taking pieces for soveniers. I broke a 16 pound sledgehammer on it.......that Buick put up a good fight! :D
[EDIT]

MisterX
03-23-2004, 09:15 PM
One thing that my Explorer post does for rasing money is we hold a competition against other local groups and sell tickets to watch. I.E. Our town Fire Post against the Police town post in basketball, or our nieghboring Fire Post insoftball is another big one. Plus its sets a venue for you to sell food and stuff. We raise anywhere from $500 to $1000 dollars depending on attraction and sponsors. Also we do a breakfast with Santa during Chirstmas time ($1000-$1500) and a breakfastst with the Easterbunny ($500-$1000)

Besides who wouldn't pay to watch two groups of geeks go at in full contact football? :yikes:

sirbleedsalot
04-12-2004, 09:50 AM
Does anyone have any ideas for a team with a town of 3000 people?
most of the ideas you already posted would have worked however they are already being used by other groups.

dddriveman
04-12-2004, 10:20 AM
I spent the first day of my spring Break Calling 54 companys for sponsership. Three of those companys called me back and i did a short little presentation for them. This is how 0979 got our money for nats :D

RoboMom
04-30-2004, 09:21 AM
Hello everyone! I was wondering if anyone had any fun, creative ideas for a new fundraiser or mystery theatre? Thanks for your help!! :)

Some new ideas that will take some work but are unique and fun.
1. Become a "mystery shopper"and donate your earnings to the team. Could work as a family fundraiser. One of the largest companies is Maritz Research. www.vitualcustomers.com, 1-800-782-4299. Once you are in their database, they will list opportunities on their site by proximity to zip code. They are looking for your opinions. Not big bucks, but flexible and sometimes fun. There are lots of other companies that do this. You need to do some research.
2. I'm just organizing the first of what I hope to be many, team and school "taste testings." Large company wants consumer opinions. This time it is chips ( when I lived in England, they were called "crisps" :) ). Takes 5 minutes/person. Look around at any food corporations in your area and approach them. Permissions are usually needed for those under 18, so need to have adult as well as student involvement.
Good luck!

KathieK
04-30-2004, 12:33 PM
Our students have had pasta dinners, sold Papa John's Pizza Kits (yum), Butter Braids (also yummy), Pies at Thanksgiving, Entertainment Books. We've had car washes and bottle/can collections (what's the "can shake" from an earlier post???). Our town has an annual townwide tag sale (garage or yard sale) and we joined in and earned close to $500 at it. Our adults recruited friends and co-workers and we staffed several concession stands at our new football stadium. (We earned several thousand dollars doing that, but it was a LOT of DIFFICULT work and our students could not be a part of it.)

One of our students has been researching fundraising and just presented the team with a list of 45 ideas for us to research this summer!

bhweezer
05-01-2004, 04:33 PM
We only do ONE fundraiser a year and thats a golf tournament. It normally brings in $15,000, but this year we got $23,000. For more information go here (http://www.teamfusion364.org/modules.php?op=modload&name=Sections&file=index&req=viewarticle&artid=16&page=1) . The best part about our fundraiser is that it not only paid for our trip to Lone Star and Atlanta, but we also recieved cash back to spend during the trip. I hoped this helps.

BandChick
05-01-2004, 04:43 PM
While i was in Annapolis, I spoke to the team from Immaculata High School in Somerset, NJ (sadly I can't remember their team number...12 something) about fundraising. They told me about how a group of students gets together outside of local stores and sell sodas and such. They talk about how it's for a good cause, and nearly everyone buys a soda or brownie or whatever else they happen to be selling that day. I know when my team does car washes, and we talk about FIRST and the good cause people tend to give us an extra $5 or $10. So make sure to hype up FIRST and get your potential customers interested in the cause and you'll be that much more successful.

I wonder...would it be illegal to sell girl scout cookies as a fundraiser? :yikes:

Billfred
05-01-2004, 10:50 PM
Girl scout cookies? probably.

FIRST scout cookies? definitely. just get your team's scout to approve 'em. autograph 'em, even.

Ah, another time that calls for FIRST water...I really think we should hoard the stuff in atlanta next year.

Mike Ciance
05-01-2004, 11:03 PM
every year, our team sells our customary Hawaiian shirts, and they are usually one of our biggest fund raisers. just find something that is cool, but that most people don't have already.

Jay H 237
05-02-2004, 12:00 AM
While i was in Annapolis, I spoke to the team from Immaculata High School in Somerset, NJ (sadly I can't remember their team number...12 something) about fundraising. They told me about how a group of students gets together outside of local stores and sell sodas and such. They talk about how it's for a good cause, and nearly everyone buys a soda or brownie or whatever else they happen to be selling that day.


Our team sells candy in local businesses. We purchase the candy in wholesale lots from a local distributor. By purchasing it wholesale and in bulk we're able to make a 50% profit on some of it.

Lisa Rodriguez
05-02-2004, 12:24 AM
RAGE had a carwash, and put out the "twin britneys" to get cars, then we made LOTS of good money, plus we had a good system to keep cars moving.
Another thing we did, sell fish, cheap goldfish in bowls w/ water and a few rocks $4, 12 sold and people asked for more, 50% profit i believe
What happens if you don't sell them (although we didn't have that problem) some team members get new pets:D

nikeairmancurry
12-05-2007, 07:33 AM
We have bulit a playhouse the last two years, and have sold raffle tiickets through the town. We had the materials donatited from a city group and profited about 4K from it. We also have a bowl-a-thon, where we ask friends a family to donate a flat fee and go out and have a good time. We felt rather than donig a candy fundrasier is that, people are more likly just to give you the money than waqit m,onthes for candy they might never eat. Plus 100% of donatations go straight to the student.

GaryVoshol
04-03-2008, 12:14 PM
Many people have a basic budget that provides for most of the necessities so many people look for a ways of generating some extra funds to enhance their programs. I suggest you that chocolate is the best way to fundraise. For more details view (url deleted)
Reported; spam in a 4-year-old thread.

martschr
04-03-2008, 12:17 PM
our team holds a halo tournament. 20 dollar entry fee, 50 cents for a game to 20 kills in the main room, and provide the concession stand. we gave out a 200 dollar first place prize also.

RoboMadi
04-06-2008, 01:13 AM
Team 612 was looking for some extra bucks for Championship, so they a door to door coupon sale.
We have a dry cleaner franchise in our area, also known as Crest Cleaners. They give us free coupons every year, which we can sell for $20 bucks each. In last two days, students have made around $3000 just by going door to door and selling coupons.
If you have any franchise that is well known in your area, you can give it a try. If some of them don't have a coupons program, you can help them start one and make money out of it, while they get promoted and get more customers.

Imad

Mike Schreiber
04-06-2008, 02:14 AM
Fund raising is one of the best ways to impact the community. People are always willing to pay to be inspired or taught, even entertained.

We do 3 separate weeks of FLL camps in the summer to teach kids prior to the upcoming FLL season, this has not only brought in about 2 or 3 thousand a year but also has TRIPLED the amount of FLL teams in our area. We provide an advanced camp for students as well which assures that they'll come back and learn more.

Another thing we've found (on a slightly unrelated note), if we do these things while students are young they grow up and join the team. I'm an example of this. RUSH did FLL camps when I was in 4th grade I did it, I conned my mom into getting the school to start an FLL team, and grew up to join FRC. So this truly does wonders for not only fund raising but also recruiting.

There is also our Parent's Night out. This is basically an activity night for kids at a local middle school. We have plenty of things to do, and of course food for sale (because kids love food, and we love having $ to build a robot). Every 10 year old is ridiculously excited to see robots, so we like to show it off. This takes quite a bit of planning, and is a decent amount of work, but they make us about $1000 each.

In the past we did a garage sale of stuff (mostly junk) we got donated from the community. It, again, was a lot of work organization wise, but in the end was successful. We found the key was advertising.

Selling stuff works well and all, but it is probably not as profitable as community events, and for some students is more of a commitment than 3 hours on a Saturday.

I'll post more if I think of them and/or remember to come back to the thread, I know we've done other things, but it's 2 am...

Sanjeev_Sachdev
05-17-2008, 07:53 AM
The first and the foremost step to start a fund raising campaign is to plan it in detail. Prepare a mailing list of the persons whom you wish to send out the mailers. Draft a letter for the Fund Raising Campaign (http://www.redhotfundraisingideas.com/), highlighting the cause for which the funds are required. Be polite in your letter, but do take care to mention in detail the ultimate goal of your campaign.

Wayne C.
05-17-2008, 09:32 AM
Tonight is the 2nd Annual Raider Robotix Body Building Show

at 6PM

last year we raised about $2500\

(and it was paid by people we dont always ask for money for robotics.)


If you start driving right now you might make the 6 PM show- we'll have a seat for you!!!

WC

Devon27
05-17-2008, 06:06 PM
Fund raising is one of the best ways to impact the community. People are always willing to pay to be inspired or taught, even entertained.

We do 3 separate weeks of FLL camps in the summer to teach kids prior to the upcoming FLL season, this has not only brought in about 2 or 3 thousand a year but also has TRIPLED the amount of FLL teams in our area. We provide an advanced camp for students as well which assures that they'll come back and learn more.

Another thing we've found (on a slightly unrelated note), if we do these things while students are young they grow up and join the team. I'm an example of this. RUSH did FLL camps when I was in 4th grade I did it, I conned my mom into getting the school to start an FLL team, and grew up to join FRC. So this truly does wonders for not only fund raising but also recruiting.

There is also our Parent's Night out. This is basically an activity night for kids at a local middle school. We have plenty of things to do, and of course food for sale (because kids love food, and we love having $ to build a robot). Every 10 year old is ridiculously excited to see robots, so we like to show it off. This takes quite a bit of planning, and is a decent amount of work, but they make us about $1000 each.

In the past we did a garage sale of stuff (mostly junk) we got donated from the community. It, again, was a lot of work organization wise, but in the end was successful. We found the key was advertising.

Selling stuff works well and all, but it is probably not as profitable as community events, and for some students is more of a commitment than 3 hours on a Saturday.

I'll post more if I think of them and/or remember to come back to the thread, I know we've done other things, but it's 2 am...

We also do a Pig Contest, each student gets a plastic piggy bank and must carry it around with them 24-7 until they get the minimum dollar amount ($25). Students are also supposed to decorate their pigs or give them a theme and at the openhouse, family, friends, sponsors, teachers, or students can put money in the pigs to vote for the best decorated or themed pig. That student wins an award and we also have a light-weigt and heavy-weight contest so the student with the most money and least weight ratio and the student with the most money and most weight ratio win too.

Another fun and pretty easy fundraiser we did this year was a bowling fundraiser. Each student was required to sell at least 5 tickets ($15/ticket) to family, friends, or themselves for the event and the ticket included pizza, salad, pop, cake, 2 games of bowling, and their stub was put into a drawing for a flat screen tv. Also, at the bowling alley, we had a 50-50 raffle and a door prize raffle where people would buy tickets to try to win various prizes that were donated by team members or local businesses. This in my opinion was the best fundraiser we have done, it brought in 3 times the amount as our parents-night-out usually does and seemed quite a bit easier too.

johnr
05-19-2008, 11:58 PM
Don't know how they exactly did it, but our team raised enough money at lunch to pay for an off season. Students paid for a lenght of duct tape and attached a teacher to a wall. It helped that the teacher was the one that handed out detentions. Still waiting to see a picture of this.

waialua359
05-20-2008, 01:56 AM
We do only 10% personal fundraising per year. We try and stay from that but do some to show our students the importance of the other types of fundraising. They hate it, but its a necessary task to allow them to realize just how difficult it is. Examples: chili, candy, and bake sales.

Our breakdown is as follows:
40% grants
10 % personal fundraising
50% donors, community events, partnerships, and unexpected support

We raised about 100k/year since 2005.

We spent quite a bit on our shop tools, equipment and machining the past several years. With most of it bought, more of the funding have been spent attending more regionals and building up an endowment/scholarship fund.

Our biggest event this past week was having a 400-500 person Robotics fundraiser event that included a program by our team (video, robot demonstration, and student testimonies on the impact of FIRST), 2 live bands, a hula show, a silent auction, buffet, and wine station for the adults.
All of this was held at one of our main sponsors facilities: Dole Plantation.
They rented chairs, tables, table cloths-had centerpieces, favors, etc. for decorations. Our students setup everything, serve the food, put on the program, and then clean up. Tickets sold for $35/person and for corporate tables of 10, we sold them for $750.00.
Planning an event like this takes a lot of work, but is much much easier than nickel/diming to raise funds. I would avoid this as much as possible. Selling something to a stranger isn't as satifying as raising funds/giving back to the community at the same time.

We are more than willing to share our fundraising/business/entrepreneurship plans.

:D