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ChuNalt787
01-11-2006, 01:00 AM
I am looking into majoring in robotics and Im trying to find a college that has a good robotics program. The ones I have applied to dont seem to have any. Im in the dallas area and would like to stay within a day drive.

Ryan Foley
01-11-2006, 01:46 AM
Unfortunately, most colleges dont actually have a major in robotics itself. However many have teams that compete in robot competitions, such as FIRST, Robocup, MATE, etc.

Most people who work in the robotics field have some sort of engineering degree, usually Electrical, Computer, Mechanical, or Systems Engineering (Computer Science is also popular). So you may want to consider going into one of those majors in order to take you too a robotics-related job.

Good Luck!

Ashley Weed
01-11-2006, 08:32 AM
For the Robotics major. Take a look at Pittsburgh (Carnegie Mellon, Pitt, etc.). It may only be a Graduate program; however, they are booming in Robotics out in that area.

BillP
01-11-2006, 08:58 AM
The University of Texas at Arlington (near Dallas) has an association with the Automation and Robotics Research Institute for graduate level students. There are also opportunities in the senior year of a bachelor's program to do some undergraduate research (technical electives and a senior design project) that involve activities at the institute.

For more information, you can visit:

http://www-mae.edu/

http://www/mars.uta.edu/

http://63.98.55.51/arri/

JVN
01-11-2006, 10:26 AM
The University of Texas at Arlington (near Dallas) has an association with the Automation and Robotics Research Institute for graduate level students. There are also opportunities in the senior year of a bachelor's program to do some undergraduate research (technical electives and a senior design project) that involve activities at the institute.

For more information, you can visit:

http://www-mae.edu/

http://www/mars.uta.edu/

http://63.98.55.51/arri/ (http://63.98.55.51/arri/)



On February 18th, University of Texas at Arlington is hosting an FVC Regional Competition. Anyone interested could come take a tour of the facilities, while also enjoying the Vex competition!

BradAMiller
01-11-2006, 11:12 AM
Unfortunately not in your area, but WPI (Worcester Polytechnic Institute) will be offering academic programs in robotics in conjunction with the Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering departments. These programs will be available starting this September and range from "Areas of Concentration" to minors in robotics.

In addition, WPI is very active in FIRST robotics - we have a FRC team, run 4-5 FRC, VEX, and Lego tournaments each year. We also developed the software that runs on the robot for EasyC for FRC.

Brad

Shu Song
01-12-2006, 02:18 PM
A "robotics" major is very rare. Though the Cornell School of Engineering doesn't have robotics as an official major but there are specializations of certain majors that included robotics. For example, I think Mechanical Engineering has a robotics specialization, Computer Science has an AI concentration, etc. Cornell Engineering is a VERY rigorous program but what you get out of it is priceless. (omg I sound like an advertisement :) )

TheAnsweris42
01-16-2006, 04:07 PM
I'm going to LSSU in Sault St. Marie Michigan for electrical engineering with a robotics option. Thats about as close as you get, especially in Michigan... they have the same option in mechanical and computer engineering as well

Andrew Blair
01-16-2006, 04:13 PM
This is what an engineering professor at a Penn State branch told me:

"Don't worry about your school having a robotics program. You won't be able to get into it in your bachelors degree education anyways. Speciality courses and work study perhaps, but you cannot get a useful "robotics Bachelors" from anywhere. Get a non-specific engineering degree, get a job, then go back for your graduates in something more specific."

It sounds pretty realistic, and it makes a lot of sense. Theres a lot of engineering disciplines to get into before you can even seriously break the ice into robotics.

Avarik
01-16-2006, 05:40 PM
I havn't heard of any "robotics" majors for undergrads. From what I've heard, though, a common route into robotics is Computer and Electrical Engineering majors.

As far as grad school, Carnegie Mellon is very good. They are one of the few schools who offers a masters/PhD in robotics (as far as I know.) Pittsburgh is also working very hard to become the nations leader in robotics, and has a ton of projects in that field going on. I know that CMU itself even has an entire building dedicated to a bunch of robotics projects, and even more going on in different areas.

Andrew Blair
01-16-2006, 06:03 PM
Yep. Its called the "Robotics Consortium", and its awesome. For a geek.:p

Matt Reiland
01-16-2006, 06:32 PM
While I was at Purdue - (getting to be quite a while ago) they were creating a major caller CIMT - Computer Integrated Manufacturing Technology. This would be in the school of technology not engineering and was a 4 year degree. This would focus on robotics in the manufacturing floor and also how robots of different kinds work with them. As for smaller mobile robots, similar to what the people above said, seems like something you would specialize in your masters or PHd.

Jeremiah Johnson
01-16-2006, 08:38 PM
Again... not in your area, but Indian Hills Community College in Ottumwa, IA has a good Robotics and Automation program. I plan on attending next year after my year off.

JamesBrown
01-16-2006, 09:30 PM
My advice would be for you to get your BS in some type of engineering from a state school and then go to a big research school like cornell, MIT, WPI, CMU for grad school, this will save you some money and get you a good background before jumping into a big research school. THis is what I will be doing, I plan to go to URI next year ( I received a full tuition scholarship), and then apply to big schools to do grad work

santosh
01-16-2006, 09:45 PM
Southern Polytechnic State University (SPSU) located in Marietta Georgia is actually developing a robotics major.

Kims Robot
01-16-2006, 10:17 PM
MIT is one of the biggest researchers of AI and robotics.

A Google Search on "MIT Robotics" (http://www.google.com/search?q=MIT+robotics&sourceid=mozilla-search&start=0&start=0&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official) shows that they have a ton of laboratories and groups associated with robotics. They have also graduated founders of many major robotics companies such as iRobot (http://www.irobot.com/sp.cfm?pageid=74) the creators of the Roomba and many military robots.

MIT also is home to the famous Kismet (http://www.ai.mit.edu/projects/humanoid-robotics-group/kismet/kismet.html) .

But as many have mentioned here, there are many colleges with good degrees in Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence), and Electrical/Mechanical Engineering. It really depends on what part of robotics interests you.

Another interesting career to pursue is animatronics or robots designed for the movies (though these days computer graphics seem to be taking over). But with more and more consumer "robots" popping up in the marketplace, it is likely that there is a good future in whatever types of robotics you get into.

Keep in mind that FIRST robots are just a tip of the iceberg. most other robots rely on a lot more AI than we use in autonmous, but as they say, FIRST is a microcosm of the real engineering world!

Sgraff_SRHS06
01-16-2006, 10:24 PM
I personally am not necessarily interested in robotics as a whole--but moreso the biomedical applications of it. Notice how the recent FIRST games resemble something that Dean Kamen and the rest of the BME community are working on. Actually FIRST sold me not on robotics, but on Biomedical Engineering. There are plenty of schools with it, but Johns Hopkins University and Duke University are two of the best in that field. (Too bad they don't offer FIRST scholarships.)

But if you are looking for straight-out robotics in the MD-VA area, Maryland-College Park, Maryland-Baltimore County, and Virginia Tech are all good choices. VT and UMBC have even participated in the DARPA challenge.

ZZII 527
01-17-2006, 12:58 PM
MIT is one of the biggest researchers of AI and robotics.

A Google Search on "MIT Robotics" (http://www.google.com/search?q=MIT+robotics&sourceid=mozilla-search&start=0&start=0&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official) shows that they have a ton of laboratories and groups associated with robotics. They have also graduated founders of many major robotics companies such as iRobot (http://www.irobot.com/sp.cfm?pageid=74) the creators of the Roomba and many military robots.

MIT also is home to the famous Kismet (http://www.ai.mit.edu/projects/humanoid-robotics-group/kismet/kismet.html) .

But as many have mentioned here, there are many colleges with good degrees in Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence), and Electrical/Mechanical Engineering. It really depends on what part of robotics interests you.

Another interesting career to pursue is animatronics or robots designed for the movies (though these days computer graphics seem to be taking over). But with more and more consumer "robots" popping up in the marketplace, it is likely that there is a good future in whatever types of robotics you get into.

Keep in mind that FIRST robots are just a tip of the iceberg. most other robots rely on a lot more AI than we use in autonmous, but as they say, FIRST is a microcosm of the real engineering world!

Heehee...Kismet :)

Robotics is an interesting combination of several majors, primarily mechanical engineering and computer science. I personally like a strong dose of mechE with a sprinkle of comp sci, but if you want a more even mix, look for a program that will allow you the flexibility to take courses in both disciplines..."create your own" major.

I'm taking the infamous "2.007" this semester. (For those not familiar with the history behind this, 2.007 used to be 2.70, which was taught by Prof. Woodie Flowers back in the day.) While it promises to be fun and a good learning experience, I can comfortable say that I've learned more about robotics from FIRST than I will from that class. I am always amazed when high school teams come up with things, particularly in the programming department, that they don't teach here until higher-level courses. I guess my point is this: look for a school with good opportunities to pursue what you like outside the classroom as well...often that is where you learn the most.

Graham Donaldson
05-27-2006, 03:44 PM
From what I've heard, Waterloo University (Waterloo, Ontario, CA) and McGill University (Montreal, Quebec, CA) have engineering programs, and I know McGill has robotics programs if not for undergrads but definitely for grads. I know for undergrads that there are courses in robotics. Pity you don't want to go outside of Dallas.

Tristan Lall
05-27-2006, 05:04 PM
From what I've heard, Waterloo University (Waterloo, Ontario, CA) and McGill University (Montreal, Quebec, CA) have engineering programs, and I know McGill has robotics programs if not for undergrads but definitely for grads. I know for undergrads that there are courses in robotics. Pity you don't want to go outside of Dallas.
The University of Waterloo (http://www.eng.uwaterloo.ca/) has mechanical, mechatronic, electrical, and systems design undergraduate engineering programs, among several others (all 5-year programs with mandatory co-op). Depending on your interests, you could make a concerted effort to "roboticize" one of those programs. However, to be realistic, it wouldn't be until your 4A and 4B terms (i.e. your fifth calendar year) that you'd even get an opportunity to do anything meaningful with robots (in your technical elective courses), in any of those programs.

It's more of a graduate thing, unfortunately.

David Brinza
05-28-2006, 03:42 AM
The NASA Robotics Education Program has a list of universities that have robotics programs. See:
Robotics Education Project - Universities (http://robotics.nasa.gov/students/univ.htm)

Most of the above programs involve graduate-level research robotics laboratories, but there may be a few undergraduate options as well. The reason for the predominance of graduate programs over undergraduate is that robotics laboratories in universities are run by research faculty who obtain grants to do cutting edge research. These programs often integrate artificial intelligence, machine vision, control theory concepts that require a good understanding of mechanical and/or electrical engineering, with computer science/engineering thrown in. The labs will have team members (graduate students and post-docs) that have degrees in engineering or science working on one or more research projects. FIRST robotics gives students a taste of what is involved, without all of the rigorous engineering analysis.

ahecht
05-28-2006, 12:22 PM
Unfortunately not in your area, but WPI (Worcester Polytechnic Institute) will be offering academic programs in robotics in conjunction with the Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering departments. These programs will be available starting this September and range from "Areas of Concentration" to minors in robotics.

In addition, WPI is very active in FIRST robotics - we have a FRC team, run 4-5 FRC, VEX, and Lego tournaments each year. We also developed the software that runs on the robot for EasyC for FRC.

Brad

There is more information on WPI's robotics programs in the 2006-2007 Course Catalog at
http://www.wpi.edu/Pubs/Catalogs/Ugrad/Current/robotdept.html
and
http://www.wpi.edu/Pubs/Catalogs/Ugrad/Current/Supp/robotics.html

Katy
06-23-2006, 01:11 AM
Carnige Mellon I am very sure does not allow undergraduates into the robotics labs.

Oh also...
Originally Posted by Sgraff_SRHS06
I personally am not necessarily interested in robotics as a whole--but moreso the biomedical applications of it. Notice how the recent FIRST games resemble something that Dean Kamen and the rest of the BME community are working on. Actually FIRST sold me not on robotics, but on Biomedical Engineering. There are plenty of schools with it, but Johns Hopkins University and Duke University are two of the best in that field. (Too bad they don't offer FIRST scholarships.)

But if you are looking for straight-out robotics in the MD-VA area, Maryland-College Park, Maryland-Baltimore County, and Virginia Tech are all good choices. VT and UMBC have even participated in the DARPA challenge.

WPI has a biomedical engineering major and WPI offers a full ride FIRST scholarship. You may want to seriously consider WPI: just about everything good there is to be had here the undergrads get their hands on. Many other "big name" schools are "big name" because of the things the graduate students do, not the undergrads. Be careful to distinguish the difference.

My friend Nick is in BME at WPI and has offered to be interrogated by prefrosh if you feel like asking him some questions. http://www.chiefdelphi.com/forums/showpost.php?p=488731&postcount=2

jrod2008
07-09-2006, 11:26 PM
Everyone, I'm no expert, but it seems as if people are thinking of a robots major as a combonation mechanical/computer AI/electrical degree. Wouldn't most engineers specialize in one area and other members of the team would specialize in other areas? That was what the way the DARPA Red Team(the one with the hummer that went the farthest in the first challege, and came in second and fourth the next year), was organized. So, it seems that one could just get a good degree in any one area, with an approprite specialization, such as AI for computer science, and pick up the rest with graduate programs.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong.

Yan Wang
07-11-2006, 03:58 PM
Heehee...Kismet :)

Robotics is an interesting combination of several majors, primarily mechanical engineering and computer science. I personally like a strong dose of mechE with a sprinkle of comp sci, but if you want a more even mix, look for a program that will allow you the flexibility to take courses in both disciplines..."create your own" major.

I'm taking the infamous "2.007" this semester. (For those not familiar with the history behind this, 2.007 used to be 2.70, which was taught by Prof. Woodie Flowers back in the day.) While it promises to be fun and a good learning experience, I can comfortable say that I've learned more about robotics from FIRST than I will from that class. I am always amazed when high school teams come up with things, particularly in the programming department, that they don't teach here until higher-level courses. I guess my point is this: look for a school with good opportunities to pursue what you like outside the classroom as well...often that is where you learn the most.

I finished my freshman year at MIT this past May and also declared my major: Course 2A - Mechanical Engineering with Instrumentation, Controls, and Robotics. Course 2A allows flexibility - students take the rigorous Course 2 (ME) core classes and then select classes to fit their specific interests (might be ME w/Biomed, Entrepreneurship, etc.) In my case, I will end up taking quite a few Course 6 (EE, CS, EECS) classes in addition to Aerospace Engineering classes to support my interests. I think you'll find that most of the fun work will be found through easily obtaining UROP (Undergraduate Research Oppurtunities Program) research positions in robotics labs or whatever fits your interest and doing actual work with professors and graduate students. There are many ways to explore your interests at MIT and even more through free cross-enrollment at Harvard. Plus, Cambridge and Boston are full of wonderful startup robotics companies in addition to well established firms that recruit heavily.

mgreenley
07-11-2006, 11:29 PM
Carnige Mellon I am very sure does not allow undergraduates into the robotics labs.

As a freshman who considered Carnegie-Mellon for quite some time before deciding on a college, I can tell you that they do indeed allow Undergraduates into the robotics lab; the link to the requirements for the undergraduate robotics minor can be found here (http://www.ri.cmu.edu/education/ugrad_minor.html) , and furthermore, Red Team, which operates from the robotics lab at CMU, has undergrads on the team as can be found here (http://www.redteamracing.org/index.cfm?method=members.list) .
CMU, to the best of my knowledge, does not have an undergraduate robotics major though. Hopefully this is helpful.

Katy
01-08-2008, 01:08 AM
Apologies for bringing up an old thread but I would be a jerk if I did not admit I'm wrong when I'm wrong.

CMU does permit undergraduates in the robotics labs. One of my coworkers this summer attends CMU and he informed me of my error. When I was a candidate prefrosh I apparently had a rather low quality tour guide who gave me incorrect information (what a shame, that very question and the answer I received were why I did not apply to CMU!) My most sincere apologies for the incorrect information and thanks to mgreenley for catching me on it.

Also update: WPI has an undergraduate robotics major now.

Chris27
01-08-2008, 01:30 AM
undergrad CS majors at Carnegie Mellon can choose to minor in robotics. You can also be a part of the best DARPA team and robocup team on the planet. Right now the DARPA team is busy at work trying to get to the moon :).

artdutra04
01-08-2008, 02:40 AM
Also update: WPI has an undergraduate robotics major now.They sure do. ;)

WPI is now the first university in this country to offer an undergraduate major in Robotics Engineering (RBE), and already RBE is the third most popular major on campus.

I'm currently a freshmen at WPI, majoring in RBE with a concentration in ME.

geowasp
01-20-2008, 02:09 PM
I personally am not necessarily interested in robotics as a whole--but moreso the biomedical applications of it. Notice how the recent FIRST games resemble something that Dean Kamen and the rest of the BME community are working on. Actually FIRST sold me not on robotics, but on Biomedical Engineering. There are plenty of schools with it, but Johns Hopkins University and Duke University are two of the best in that field. (Too bad they don't offer FIRST scholarships.)

But if you are looking for straight-out robotics in the MD-VA area, Maryland-College Park, Maryland-Baltimore County, and Virginia Tech are all good choices. VT and UMBC have even participated in the DARPA challenge.

Yep, same here, sold on BME!! JHU actually came out w/ the brain cap and robotic arm implementation shown at the championship (last year, i think?) where the user simply thinks about moving the hand, and the brain cap picks up brainwaves and interprets it to real mechanical movements on a robotic arm. i recently met the professor who heads the lab for that. Robotics and sensors is one of 4 focus areas that BMEs have to choose from at Johns hopkins, ppl should apply here, since I could barely find any FIRST ppl here!!

Garth1388
01-22-2008, 02:37 AM
Cal Poly San Luis Obispo has a massive Enginering program. While there is no robotics major, there is Mechanical, Electrical, Materials, Software, Aero Engineering, etc. All of these disciplines definitely contribute to Robotics. There are also a few Robotics clubs.

While you won't get the kind of education you can at MIT, you will get hands on experience right from your first quarter. As a co-worker of mine said, "At most schools, they teach you about engineering, but at Cal Poly, you learn how to be an engineer."

check it out (http://calpoly.edu/student/prospective.html)

Mikell Taylor
01-22-2008, 07:31 AM
From the point of view of someone at a robotics company...

I know places like WPI are starting robotics majors now (and yes I am jealous), but to be totally honest, I've been involved in a lot of hiring my company has done, and I don't know what we'd do with them. What we would probably do during an interview is sit down wit them and ask what they're best at/like most: EE, ME, or software. Then they would be put into the right department. It makes our jobs easier if it's a degree name that matches one of our departments.

There are a few caveats, though. Our company (and many like it) have systems engineers, which is what I am, and which I think the robotics engineering majors might ultimately be suited for, but which tends to be a more experienced position (we don't hire entry-level systems engineers... I had to "do time" in other departments first). These positions might match up well with robotics engineers, but the job is basically technical management: how do the customer requirements translate to technical requirements? How can you make sure what the EEs build fit into the boxes the MEs are building? Did anyone bother asking Software what information they need to write the control code? How/when are we testing this stuff? WHY ISN'T ANYONE DOING ANYTHING? Etc... Basically, you have to have that high-level view of life, the universe, and everything, and be able to coordinate it effectively.

Also, some much smaller companies tend to hire people named "robotics engineer" or "robotics researcher" or "electromechanical engineer" or things like that. I don't know enough about what those jobs do to compare them to a standard ME/EE/SW job, but I know places like Vecna, Sarcos, and others have posted openings like that.

And finally, even though I don't know what we'd do with a Robotics Engineer now, that's not to say we'd never know what to do with them. We definitely need well-rounded people at our company, but right now we're still only putting people into individual departments. I think iRobot is the same way from what I remember talking with them. Personally I think industry should definitely change a bit to accommodate these new awesome engineers, but unfortunately I'm not in charge :) Yet!

So in conclusion: this was my long way of saying, it doesn't really matter what your degree is. What I think you should ABSOLUTELY do is find a school that has COOL research. Not just "good" research, COOL research. Find the prof(s) who do robotics and get talking to them. See if they let undergrads help out. That's what is most important to a company like mine, not which degree you have. Get whatever experience you can and then whether you're an EE or RE, you'll have an awesome job waiting for you!

expensivehobby
01-23-2008, 02:55 PM
While at Carnegie Mellon 98-02 I'm not sure we had an undergraduate Robotics Major, but there were many robotics related classes that you could take. There were also many undergraduate robotics research opportunities and also opportunities to work at the NREC (National Robotics Engineering Consortium) as well as other robotics companies in the area. I would highly recommend Carnegie Mellon if you are seriously interested in a future in robotics.

I had a great experience there, and while not a robotics major of any sort worked within the field on many occasions.

That all being said, I'm sure there are many great programs at other schools as well. I only mention Carnegie Mellon because I have experience there.

Btw, please excuse me if I got the acronym for the Consortium wrong.

-Ray

Conor Ryan
02-07-2008, 01:10 AM
As a current undergraduate student in Mechanical Engineering, I'll tell you one thing, Mechanical, Electrical and Computer Engineering, as well as (but very limited) Computer Science, get a lot of experience with the concept of robots and automation. As far as a program that specializes in rolling everything into one nicely named major, it happens but it is rare. Pretty much a Robotics major would have almost an identical course load to any Mechanical, Electrical or Computer Engineering major. The concept of having a major that specializes in combing all of them into one would in reality only do some educational justice if you were in school for about...6 years. And for that reason, it is primarily a graduate degree. One program that is worth looking into is Mechatronics offered up at the University of Waterloo, pretty much it's a Mechanical Engineering and Electrical Engineering hybrid.

Anyway, I'm not the one to ask about Mechatronics degrees, I am however a person to talk to if you are interested in the University of Dayton (http://www.udayton.edu), I am a tour guide and I specialize in Prospective Engineering Students... Good Luck!

1086wulf
02-07-2008, 10:00 AM
I would reccommend going to a 4 year engineering degree college and getting a degree in electrical engineering or a related field. You can specialize in robotics or something similar if wanted. I am going to Alabama for electrical engineering. I do not know of the engineering colleges in your area but they should be easy to look up. You can take a grad program later for robotics but for undergrad do something more broad.

idunno42
04-21-2011, 10:52 AM
WPI has an undergrad major in robotic engineering. They claim to be the only school to offer such a major to undergrads.

juda92
04-21-2011, 11:46 AM
Lake Superior State University (http://www.lssu.edu/) in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan has a very good engineering program. They have all kinds of different programs to get into, with an option to minor in robotics. There's an annual job fair to help graduating students find a job in the field. There's also a FIRST team to mentor if you want to do so. While you're there, if you decide engineering isn't for you, they have all kinds of other programs (http://www.lssu.edu/academics/) to choose from.