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Dantvman27
01-19-2007, 01:30 PM
What's everyone’s scouting system?


Last year it pretty good, we knew more about some teams then they did with our scouting team but this year will be even better




We will have a 10 person scouting team set up, each person with a different job placed around the arena, taking data and relaying it to the master computer and then Thursday night we are having a strategy/drive team meeting, mapping out each one of our matches tentatively. With things subject to change based on any new data we collect and also we will watch video of every match

6 people watching the field, each taking a robot per match, with specially designed spread sheet, 2 people in the pits doing interviews to see what the team its self has to say on its robot, one person keeping master score, and a camera person in the second level of the arena videoing every match

Anyone get this complicated or more? I’d love for input or questions

Rick-906
01-19-2007, 02:52 PM
We have 2-3 laptops in the stands, one is hooked into two HD cams, one getting the entire field, one zoomed in on the action. we're gonna try to photo-catalog robots in our database, we tried that last year but had the wrong usb cables for the camera we were using.

well, this is our game plan anyway... i know for sure we'll have one HD cam but the second depends on our schools media dept.

good luck

Dantvman27
01-19-2007, 03:03 PM
So are the only ones with the old fashion giant scouting team, it seems to be way more efficient when comparing to other teams that were just filming, we had some great stats and amazing defensive game and could help our alliance partners and improve their game play. Lots of teams were impressed with the in depth ness of stat sheets

EricH
01-19-2007, 03:31 PM
Thursday: pit interviews. Take pictures of all robots to make it easier to figure out which they are later.
Friday: 7 people in the stands. 6 watch one robot apiece, noting key data. The seventh inputs the data onto a laptop.
Friday evening: team meets and goes over the data. A computer program sorts the teams by how much use they'd be to us as what. Team discusses options for who we'll pick if we are picking.
Saturday morning: Repeat Friday. Get final list to team rep just before selection.
Saturday afternoon: relax and watch the finals...

Dantvman27
01-19-2007, 11:06 PM
Thursday: pit interviews. Take pictures of all robots to make it easier to figure out which they are later.
Friday: 7 people in the stands. 6 watch one robot apiece, noting key data. The seventh inputs the data onto a laptop.
Friday evening: team meets and goes over the data. A computer program sorts the teams by how much use they'd be to us as what. Team discusses options for who we'll pick if we are picking.
Saturday morning: Repeat Friday. Get final list to team rep just before selection.
Saturday afternoon: relax and watch the finals...

basicly what we got, minus the pictures, but good idea but any robot that stands out we will remember, and also will have game footage

Ethulin
01-20-2007, 12:38 AM
STAMP Scouting all the way baby :).

http://www.stampscouting.org/ For those of you who don't know, STAMP stands for Statistical Team Analysis of Match Performance. It is a multi-team collaborative software based in PHP+mySQL.

And yes, we are working on the 2007 version as we speak... or is it type...

We have 2-3 laptops in the stands, one is hooked into two HD cams, one getting the entire field, one zoomed in on the action. we're gonna try to photo-catalog robots in our database, we tried that last year but had the wrong usb cables for the camera we were using.

well, this is our game plan anyway... i know for sure we'll have one HD cam but the second depends on our schools media dept.

good luck

Rick,
We would be interested in setting up such a video system. Do the HD cameras record directly to the laptop's Harddrive? If so, could you give a little more info on how exactly this is done?

JamesByrne
01-20-2007, 02:41 AM
Rick,

Do you actualy have people in the rooms or whatever that review the tapes, and if so do you organize them by matches, so you can get to them more easily when trying to watch a match.

BandChick
01-20-2007, 09:04 AM
We've always in the past had scouting sheets that we send out with our kids. Much like Eric said, we do pit scouting Thursday (sometimes we have to finish up early Friday), then we have 6 kids sit in the stands for round scouting. From that, we compile a binder by team number of all the information we have.

Then, we take the top 24 rankings and compare/rearrange them based on 1) if they are good partners for us 2) if they hav had problems in their various matches 3) do we work well with them (as in Andy & JVN's favorite phrase "the jerk factor")

Rick-906
02-03-2007, 12:26 AM
Yeah, we record onto the hard drive, with the tape in the cameras as backup. im not even sure what program it is, ive used it twice recording rugby matches...
one of our sponsors dropped it off last spring... anyway ill try to get back to you, i have a feeling the 2nd cam might not happen, depending on media classes.

we have people [me] to review footage, most of it wont get used, but for screw ups, damage, point proving, or proof of a bad call by the ref, its there.
usualy i just name the clips by match. with a match list we can watch prospective alliance members fairly easily later.

752PRMami
02-13-2007, 06:13 PM
does anyone have any suggestions as to what to add on a scouting sheet?

Scott Perry
03-02-2007, 05:37 PM
We used to use a system where about 6-10 scouters were asigned a few teams to scout. On Thursday, they'd interview their assigned teams and scout one of the later practice rounds.

On Saturday and Friday, they'd be responcible to scout 2 matches for their teams. That gave us 5 scoutings for every team and an interview. It gave us a lot of data that was useful both before matches and during alliance selections.


This year, we're switching to what's been coined the 'sticker system.' I first tried it out in Atlanta last year to phenoninal success. We used to think that having scouters specializing in specific teams was a very strong advantage. After co-leading the scouting division of 514 for three years, I've had a change of heart.

Basically, we scrapped the unessessary depth of specializing. The biggest change was dropping the interviews all together. We've looked at them less and less every year, and in the end it was only a list of what a team said it could do.

Now we take a few sheets of blank computer address envelope labels and write every Team number at the event 5 times. Then, we take colored pencils and fill them in with a color for each day (1 for Thurs, 2 for Fri and Sat). As the regional goes on, our intrepid scouts simply scout a team if its being put on the field and there's a sticker left for it that day. It works so well that we end up increasing efficiency and decreasing the number of needed scouts! Of course we'll always need a separate person to type in the voluminous data onto my laptop.

vivek16
03-02-2007, 06:46 PM
well i have been prescouting already on what they can "do" and i guess i will rate each team on a scale of 1-5 on how well they can do these things.

although as a rookie team that cant score we really dont have as big a need to scout as other teams.

EricH
03-02-2007, 06:59 PM
although as a rookie team that cant score we really dont have as big a need to scout as other teams.If you can play defense, you may be picked. Scout away; it can be really embarassing to find out that you're up high (through picking or ranking) and nobody on your alliance has a clue as to who to pick during the next round of selection. (It's happened before.)

Zyik
03-02-2007, 09:32 PM
Scouting team of a few people, all armed with scouting sheets and cheap cameras. Snap shots of bots, up load all data onto a scouting data base on a laptop.

We're a tiny team, only like 10 people, so this might take a while to scout a competition of 48 teams.

jagman2882
03-02-2007, 09:43 PM
Thursday: pit interviews. Take pictures of all robots to make it easier to figure out which they are later.
Friday: 7 people in the stands. 6 watch one robot apiece, noting key data. The seventh inputs the data onto a laptop.
Friday evening: team meets and goes over the data. A computer program sorts the teams by how much use they'd be to us as what. Team discusses options for who we'll pick if we are picking.
Saturday morning: Repeat Friday. Get final list to team rep just before selection.
Saturday afternoon: relax and watch the finals...

this is basically a carbon copy of what 1126 does....it is an essential tool

vadyr
03-02-2007, 09:51 PM
we're pretty low-tech. i know a lot of teams record each match, set up excel spreadsheets, and what not....but we just use pink pieces of paper that have who we are with, who we are against...and thats pretty much it. we don't go around and take pictures or scout at the pits....we just watch each match and record some simple notes...but i do have to give a lot of the credit to our lead scouter, BT....he is just a mastermind at scouting...we've had several occasions where we won against an awesome alliance, mostly due to his strategies...so good job BT! but i hope to soon be able to buy him a palm pilot or a cheap laptop or some kind so that we can be a little more hi-tech. but as low tech as we are, we seem to be pretty efficient and effective with scouting. good luck teams!

Sean Marks
03-02-2007, 09:58 PM
Our setup is pretty simple. Im lead scout so what were doing in 1 laptop (with many batteries :D ) I assign 1 person to watch a robot in a match to get information, then they report to me. I also when free go to the pit and ask any teams i have questions for. Its working really well and we've made some really good plans from it. I cant wait to see what happens tomorrow.

Sean

(Oh also were using an excel spreadsheet and we have a wireless printer set up to print out hard copies.)

Scott Perry
03-03-2007, 12:20 PM
I've got another question for you other guys. What do you use your scouting data for? Do you try and use it for every match so you go in with a plan, or only for alliance picking, or both?

Jack Jones
03-03-2007, 12:39 PM
Ours will involve a great deal of thought and analysis.
Meanwhile, I'll have a match list tally with +1 good - 0 average - -1 bad.
Finally after much debate - we'll go with the +0-

AChastain
03-03-2007, 04:56 PM
Cyber Blue uses our collected info in the eliminations.

This year we have a much more organized scouting team and some new PDA's we're dying to try out.

We are planning to record all of the information that we decide is important on the individual PDA's and then transfer them to a single hard dive where it will be sorted and passed along to our strategist.

tjcasser
03-04-2007, 10:07 AM
768 has been doing it the old-fashioned way (six scouts in the stands working with paper reporting sheets and two or three with pit-reporting sheets doing interviews) for a few years now. The issue becomes a paper-shuffle before each of our matches to see what the capabilities and performance of the other teams involved are.

Last year, we abortively tried a PDA-based application that just got away from us, but ended up resorting to the paper sheets again when it became too large of a task to get everything entered in a timely fashion. This year's assumption was simply to go with the paper sheets anyway, with having a laptop in the stands to run our new application and collect the data. The base idea is that it should take the person on the laptop no more than a minute to enter the information on a single match.. and thus far in our tests (Trenton on Friday), it seemed to be working fine, since no one has proposed to change the system before Finger Lakes next week.

We'll see how it works for us.

ewankoff
03-04-2007, 11:40 AM
I was really impressed by our scouting system this year, and believe it or not it was developed by a couple of freshman!

Luckily our district provided every student with a laptop computer. We used this asset to have scouts directly input data to a data base. We were able to search this database for specific points of interest. We were also able to share this info with other teams through a wireless network which about 1/3 of the teams accesed. This scouting database really helped us get to be 3rd seed and semifinalists at NJ this year as well as helping us get the J&J sportsmanship award.

VanMan
03-04-2007, 12:06 PM
We didn't scout really. We just picked the teams that looked cool. We also didn't care what they said they could do. We care what they really can do.

whytheheckme
03-04-2007, 12:13 PM
and believe it or not it was developed by a couple of freshman!


lol, that's not nice.:p

Jacob

SteveGPage
03-04-2007, 04:23 PM
We also use a combination of paper and computer scouting. We have 6 kids in the stands looking at each robot during a match - counting rings scored, ramping, etc... and we send several kids to the pits for detailed team information. All of that information is feed into an Access database. We use all of that data to help determine strategy before a match. If anyone would like a copy of the access database that we have developed, I would be happy to send it to you. If you are going to be in Annapolis at the Chesapeake Regional, come see us and we can give you a copy of what we use.

768 has been doing it the old-fashioned way (six scouts in the stands working with paper reporting sheets and two or three with pit-reporting sheets doing interviews) for a few years now. The issue becomes a paper-shuffle before each of our matches to see what the capabilities and performance of the other teams involved are.

Last year, we abortively tried a PDA-based application that just got away from us, but ended up resorting to the paper sheets again when it became too large of a task to get everything entered in a timely fashion. This year's assumption was simply to go with the paper sheets anyway, with having a laptop in the stands to run our new application and collect the data. The base idea is that it should take the person on the laptop no more than a minute to enter the information on a single match.. and thus far in our tests (Trenton on Friday), it seemed to be working fine, since no one has proposed to change the system before Finger Lakes next week.

We'll see how it works for us.

chewy
03-05-2007, 08:35 AM
believe it or not it was developed by a couple of freshman!



Thanks :]

Fred Sayre
03-05-2007, 11:32 AM
We have a access database seen here:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/27047719@N00/411506903/

We make paper scouting sheets that mimic the access form for 6 kids to record the match data, which is then fed into the database for calculation of averages and robot comparisons. Overall it is a lot of work, but provides us with really good strategical information as well as an almost instant list for picking alliance members.

acumenerratica
03-09-2007, 02:44 AM
Team RICE 870 is proud to announce that in a matter of hours, "Fluffy Network" will make its official debut at the Finger Lakes Regional. Comprised of a Filemaker Pro 8.5 Database, an Adobe Lightroom-generated photo gallery, and LAN messaging implementation, Fluffy Network is our end-to-end system for Pit Scouting, Match Scouting, Robot Photography, and Stands-to-Pit Communications.

It goes something like this:
1) Pit interview data is entered into my half-broken (::tear::) macbook, the drive team can read this in real time
2) Match data is entered in real time by scouts at inverter-powered computers in the stands, the drive team can read this in real time
3) An elegant photo gallery of tagged robot pictures is available to both the Pit and Stands
4) A NASA Mission Control Style communication link provides a dialogue connection between the drive team and the stands, so the drive team can ask scouts anything not covered by the metrics
5) A printer in the pit allows strategy plans and scout reports to be in the hands of the drive team as they walk up to their alliance.
6) All this is served wirelessly by a Linksys WRT54G covered in fur, hence "Fluffy Network"

our only problem is we are about 3 laptops short at this regional, and are relegated to doing half our match scouting electronically, and half on paper, to be entered when there's time...

any Finger Lakes Regional teams that have 3 laptops they want to spare (and/or scouts)...we would love to form a co-op, and would obviously open FluffyNet access to you in return for your help

anyone?

bduddy
03-10-2007, 09:54 PM
We have one sheet of paper for each team, and each scout (Scouts make up most of our team at competitions) usually gets around 3-5 teams. They follow the same teams for the whole competition, both watching matches and interviewing in pits (we haven't done this before...), trading teams if need be when their assignments conflict. This is how we've always done it, but this year, we're actually doing it with some degree of organization... which makes me happy :D

meatmanek
03-10-2007, 10:45 PM
See, all you people are trying to come up with some sort of mathematical formula for which team is best. Have a group of dedicated people sit in the stands and watch every match, and then discuss between matches (who did something cool, who was dependable, who scored the most, who would be best as our partner)

Then have them make a list of the top 20 robot picks. They'll remember the good ones, and the less impressive teams won't show up on the list. Because your scouters are focusing on the actual robot and gameplay, rather than what the team says they can do, or statistics of wins/losses, you'll get much better results.

Have one of these people be your team representative. Have him/her take the list if you get picked or get to choose.

Bob22341
03-10-2007, 10:47 PM
Codex Robotica Software, availiable here:

http://www.chiefdelphi.com/media/papers/1941

MariaChristineK
03-10-2007, 11:17 PM
Our team has been around for long enough to know that sometimes scouting just has to rely on the scout's ability to understand the game. Our team was just at the Pittsburgh Regional and it seemed that a major key was the double ramp. The two alliances that made it to finals both had at least one bot with double ramping capability. Hey, 60 points it quite a lot...or at least it was at this past regional.

Cuog
03-10-2007, 11:49 PM
Our team didn't do any scouting :(

I was wondering what were some of your strongest arguments for why to scout and how it helps as many people on my team find it to be useless, and I would like to prove them otherwise.

zander_108
03-11-2007, 12:51 AM
Hey.. My team has SOAP, scouting comes standard :D

cziggy343
03-11-2007, 09:18 AM
Our team has been around for long enough to know that sometimes scouting just has to rely on the scout's ability to understand the game. Our team was just at the Pittsburgh Regional and it seemed that a major key was the double ramp. The two alliances that made it to finals both had at least one bot with double ramping capability. Hey, 60 points it quite a lot...or at least it was at this past regional.

thats how we roll, except im one of very, very few students that do it on the team. but all i do is understand the game and how people play it. then i watch the majority of the qualifying matches and make notes on a spreadsheet (courtesy of Duane Card and Lee Shehan). then i (and a couple other people) present these notes at a team meeting on friday night. nothing crazy, just keep it simple [stupid]:D

kireitenshi00
03-11-2007, 12:19 PM
Our scouting system this year is AMAZING. We begin on Thursday, where our team goes around the pits and asks other teams basic information about their robots and takes pictures. Also beginning on Thursday, we have 6 people up in the stands who watch the teams during their practice matches. Each person takes a team and records their moves on her computer. The moves are relayed to a master computer, which calculates the next best move for the team to make.

We do the same type of scouting on Friday and Saturday, and we've found that our scouting system is more accurate at ranking teams rather than the FIRST rankings. All in all, it's a pretty sweet program.

Bob22341
03-11-2007, 03:12 PM
Our scouting system this year is AMAZING. ... The moves are relayed to a master computer, which calculates the next best move for the team to make.


What software are you using?