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archiver
06-23-2002, 09:54 PM
Posted by Matt Rizzo.

Coach on team #163 from International Academy.

Posted on 8/23/99 1:13 PM MST



Does anyone have the spec sheets for the ADC, the SSC, and the shift registers that are on the First '98 Reciever Board? I am looking for the actual spec's right fromt the manufacturer. Thanks for any help.

-Matt Rizzo

archiver
06-23-2002, 09:54 PM
Posted by Michael Martus.   [PICTURE: SAME | NEW | HELP]


Coach on team #47, Chief Delphi, from Pontiac Central H.S. and Delphi Automotives Systems.

Posted on 8/24/99 7:24 PM MST


In Reply to: On-board chip spec's posted by Matt Rizzo on 8/23/99 1:13 PM MST:



Matt,

Send off an e-mail to Eric at FIRST I am sure that he can help you if the information is available for release.
It is possible that the details of the board and the components are protected by a patent

M116

archiver
06-23-2002, 09:55 PM
Posted by Joe Johnson.   [PICTURE: SAME | NEW | HELP]


Engineer on team #47, Chief Delphi, from Pontiac Central High School and Delphi Automotive Systems.

Posted on 8/24/99 8:10 PM MST


In Reply to: On-board chip spec's posted by Matt Rizzo on 8/23/99 1:13 PM MST:



Matt,

I am mailing you the specs you asked for. Good luck.

BTW, the SSC that FIRST uses is not quite an off the shelf unit. They use a faster crystal
(16Mhz vs 8Mhz as I recall) and they communicate with the Slave CPU (our CPU) at a
correspondingly faster baud rate (19200 vs 9600 again if memory serves).

Good luck.

Joe J.

archiver
06-23-2002, 09:55 PM
Posted by Lloyd Burns.

Coach on team #188, Woburn Robotics, from Woburn Collegiate and Canada 3000, ScotiaBank, Royal Bank Financial.

Posted on 8/26/99 3:00 AM MST


In Reply to: On-board chip spec's posted by Matt Rizzo on 8/23/99 1:13 PM MST:



: Does anyone have the spec sheets for the ADC, the SSC, and the shift registers that are on the First '98 Reciever Board? I am looking for the actual spec's right fromt the manufacturer. Thanks for any help.

: -Matt Rizzo

By now, Matt, you have Joe's info, but the ADC's, and the SR's data sheets
are available on the web from the manufacturers, and that means any manufacturer
who makes those chips; they are often generic.

In my clone, I chose to use a '165 on the switch input, because the '597
was not readily available here. It turns out, by good fortune, that the board
layout was eased by the different pinout.

The SSR First uses was a unit that was ordered from a source in the south-
western U.S., as a PIC16C61-20 custom programmed to do the job. I programmed
a 16C84 to do the same job, with my own program. The '84 was easier for me to
use as a development device as it has EEPROM rather than UV-erasable program memory.

My point here is that you can get info on most any standard IC still in production
from the net, and program the intelligent non-standard items yourself. And once you
have the information, feel free to substitute: search the manufacturers site data
sheets for devices with the same function, noting any different pinouts.

Main point - have fun doing it, knowing that you'll be keeping your next First
controller permanently. My clone's cost (one off) was about half the amount of
the deposit. :-\

archiver
06-23-2002, 09:55 PM
Posted by Joe Johnson.   [PICTURE: SAME | NEW | HELP]


Engineer on team #47, Chief Delphi, from Pontiac Central High School and Delphi Automotive Systems.

Posted on 8/26/99 6:27 PM MST


In Reply to: Re: On-board chip spec's posted by Lloyd Burns on 8/26/99 3:00 AM MST:



I will have to agree that you can build a clone for about $500 (less radios -- unless you have found a much cheaper radio than I could find -- a radio that works I mean).

Unless you pay yourself ;-)

Yes building a clone controller was fun to on some level, but it was also a lot of work too (especially the high current area where heavy gauge wire and tons of solder were required -- the smell gets in your hair and you smell it all day!)

All in all, I am glad that FIRST is making arrangements for us keep them this year.

When you think of all the teams that have reverse engineered that board, there were many many many man-hours of duplicate effort.

With the controller available for sale, perhaps teams might even be able to let there programmers have the controller long enough to write some better code.

As for me, I am pressing our programmers for a robust PID control loop scheme for position control of robot arms.

May your poles never cross into the right half plane!

Joe J.