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Unread 04-30-2010, 02:55 PM
Unsung FIRST Hero
Al Skierkiewicz Al Skierkiewicz is offline
Broadcast Eng/Chief Robot Inspector
AKA: Big Al WFFA 2005
FRC #0111 (WildStang)
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Re: Old FRC Controllers (Pre-NI)

KE5WGE,
Before we go too much further, you have to seriously look at what is exactly taking place in the studio you show. Capitol Records (as well as some other studios) use(d) this method in the belief that variable acoustics made better sounding records. With the slats closed a livelier sound was made while with the slats open a fair amount of absorption was introduced making the studio dead. Some instrumentation has been added since these designs were first introduced and a better understanding of mic technique, noise control, reverb (rt60), room cutoff frequencies and standing waves now rules designs. The design you show became popular after design and construction techniques introduced by F. Alton Everest became common. His ideas and use of materials controlled some of the variables listed above but design choice now is to fix the problems at the source rather than correcting with the use of other materials and construction. It was quite common to cover up standing waves of a particular frequency by having narrow band tuned acoustic filter built into the room. You can achieve the same effect in an anechoic chamber but a chamber is a poor choice for a music performance studio. Items like choosing the correct room ratios to minimize standing waves, making the surfaces in the room anything but parallel and controlling reflections to keep them out of the mics is successful and produces a room that performers like. Take a look at back issues of MIX Magazine and see the studios they highlight. There are even some interesting articles on studio design in the past as well. Articles written by Russ Berger are particularly interesting. Remember that correcting a problem after the room is built is infinitely more expensive than correcting the problem in design.
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Al
WB9UVJ
www.wildstang.org
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Last edited by Al Skierkiewicz : 04-30-2010 at 02:57 PM.
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