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Unread 06-02-2012, 07:01 PM
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Re: Technology in Curriculum - Higher Ed

Quote:
Originally Posted by ManicMechanic View Post
I'm a math teacher at a junior college and am in the early stages of developing some curriculum for a lower level math course (prealgebra). In the "old" days, it would have been a textbook, but I believe that the days of paper texts are numbered. I'm trying to get a feel for what kinds of technology-based curricula people in HS and college have used, how much they've liked it, and how successful it's been. I'm not talking about a course based on a traditional textbook with a few videos or PowerPoints thrown in, but a curriculum where technology is foundational to the course content and is used on a daily or regular basis. It would be great to have students', teachers', and developers' points of view.

1. Are you a teacher, student, curriculum writer, software developer, or other?
2. What was the class/course? At what level (HS, undergrad - which year, graduate)?
3. What was the technology used, and how was it used in the course? For example online course, e-book, paper textbook with online homework and quizzes, video series, etc.
4. What devices and services did the user need to have access to (e.g., PC, e-reader, online access, software)?
5. What did you like/dislike about the technology? Did you like it better than using a traditional paper text?
6. How effective was the technology in your learning of the course content? Was it better/worse, and in what ways?
7. Do you think the technology will become outdated and need to be replaced more quickly than a traditional text (~5 years)?
8. Do you have any other comments and/or suggestions?

A supplemental question for teachers/mentors -- do you know of any conferences or resources that address this topic?

Lots of questions -- I'd be grateful to answers on any of them.
Have you looked at Khan Academy? You could set it up as a "flipped" classroom. Students watch video as homework and come to class to work on problem sets. If you are doing prealgebra in jr. college then chances are it would be good for the students to start at the beginning.
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