Go to Post Could you explain this concept of a break from FIRST? Did my wife put you up to this? - Gary Dillard [more]
Home
Go Back   Chief Delphi > Technical > Robotics Education and Curriculum
CD-Media   CD-Spy  
portal register members calendar search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read FAQ rules

 
Reply
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
  #16   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-12-2017, 12:09 AM
Cory's Avatar
Cory Cory is offline
Registered User
AKA: Cory McBride
FRC #0254 (The Cheesy Poofs)
Team Role: Engineer
 
Join Date: May 2002
Rookie Year: 2001
Location: Redwood City, CA
Posts: 6,937
Cory has a reputation beyond reputeCory has a reputation beyond reputeCory has a reputation beyond reputeCory has a reputation beyond reputeCory has a reputation beyond reputeCory has a reputation beyond reputeCory has a reputation beyond reputeCory has a reputation beyond reputeCory has a reputation beyond reputeCory has a reputation beyond reputeCory has a reputation beyond repute
Send a message via AIM to Cory
Re: FRC/CNC Class - CNC Machine

Quote:
Originally Posted by cad321 View Post
We regularly mill aluminum on our tormach and do it at 40 inches per minute with about 30 thou depth cuts on a 3/8 -1/2 cutter depending on the job. We used to take much deeper passes (half the diameter of the cutter, so 1/4in on a 1/2in cutter) but we ditched that method because we found dynamic milling toolpaths with the smaller depth cuts better as we could run the machines so much faster. The thickness of the material really doesn't matter for us so long as it fits in machine. This year the thickest peice we did was 1.5in 6061 aluminum. And yes, nylon and other plastics we go through very quickly.

Here is a link to something we machined last year.
Tormachs aren't great machines but .030 is a ridiculously small cut for one. You should be able to slot full depth in 1/4" Al with a 1/4" cutter no problem, provided you have coolant to clear chips.

It sounds like you're getting good results, but the entire point of "dynamic milling" toolpaths (trochoidal milling/HSM/etc) is large axial depth of cut and narrow radial depth of cut (10-20% cutter diameter), which results in more efficient use of the tool (full flute usage instead of wearing out the bottom 1/4" of the tool), higher feed rates due to some science (radial chip thinning, if interested in learning more), and constant load on the cutter. If you do some digging into HSM cutting strategies you will probably be able to dramatically increase your productivity, especially on thicker parts.

[edit] Just took a look at your video. You guys obviously understand HSM. The way you worded your post was very confusing. I think you meant you take .030" width of cut.
__________________
2001-2004: Team 100
2006-Present: Team 254

Last edited by Cory : 03-12-2017 at 12:11 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #17   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-12-2017, 12:17 AM
cad321 cad321 is offline
Jack of all trades, Master of none
AKA: Brian Wagg
FRC #2386 (Trojans)
Team Role: Alumni
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Rookie Year: 2012
Location: Burlington, Ontario
Posts: 402
cad321 is just really nicecad321 is just really nicecad321 is just really nicecad321 is just really nicecad321 is just really nice
Re: FRC/CNC Class - CNC Machine

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory View Post
Tormachs aren't great machines but .030 is a ridiculously small cut for one. You should be able to slot full depth in 1/4" Al with a 1/4" cutter no problem, provided you have coolant to clear chips.

It sounds like you're getting good results, but the entire point of "dynamic milling" toolpaths (trochoidal milling/HSM/etc) is large axial depth of cut and narrow radial depth of cut (10-20% cutter diameter), which results in more efficient use of the tool (full flute usage instead of wearing out the bottom 1/4" of the tool), higher feed rates due to some science (radial chip thinning, if interested in learning more), and constant load on the cutter. If you do some digging into HSM cutting strategies you will probably be able to dramatically increase your productivity, especially on thicker parts.

[edit] Just took a look at your video. You guys obviously understand HSM. The way you worded your post was very confusing. I think you meant you take .030" width of cut.
Ya I see now how my post could be misleading. Unfortunately our head mentor (the schools shop teacher) doesn't believe in coolant so that puts a bit of a bottleneck on our speeds. However all this being said, considering the ease of learning the system and it's costs, I feel tormachs are a very capable machine for learning and FRC.
Reply With Quote
  #18   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-12-2017, 11:36 AM
weberr's Avatar
weberr weberr is offline
Registered User
AKA: Ron Weber
FRC #3641 (The Flying Toastters)
Team Role: Coach
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Rookie Year: 2011
Location: South Lyon East
Posts: 66
weberr has a reputation beyond reputeweberr has a reputation beyond reputeweberr has a reputation beyond reputeweberr has a reputation beyond reputeweberr has a reputation beyond reputeweberr has a reputation beyond reputeweberr has a reputation beyond reputeweberr has a reputation beyond reputeweberr has a reputation beyond reputeweberr has a reputation beyond reputeweberr has a reputation beyond repute
Re: FRC/CNC Class - CNC Machine

Wow. As a production machinist, I have always believed in why take two cuts when you can take one.

I have run $150K CNC mills, and I have to say, the Tormach PCNC 1100 is a unbelievable machine for it's low cost. You can't plunge a 1" dia cutter 3" in 4140 and travel at 12" per minute like the big boys, but you can plunge a 1/4" dia solid carbide cutter through 1/4 aluminum plate and travel at 7" per minute. Make sure your endmills are 2 flute if you are machining aluminum, and you must use collant. There are many friendly coolants out there

As a former production manager and cutting tool manufacturer, and now a HS educator, I can easily say the Tormach is you best bet.
Reply With Quote
  #19   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-12-2017, 12:06 PM
sanddrag sanddrag is offline
On to my 16th year in FRC
FRC #0696 (Circuit Breakers)
Team Role: Teacher
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Rookie Year: 2002
Location: Glendale, CA
Posts: 8,598
sanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond repute
Re: FRC/CNC Class - CNC Machine

Why plunge an endmill when you can helix or ramp, and why only two flutes when you can run three?
__________________
Teacher/Engineer/Machinist - Team 696 Circuit Breakers, 2011 - Present
Mentor/Engineer/Machinist, Team 968 RAWC, 2007-2010
Technical Mentor, Team 696 Circuit Breakers, 2005-2007
Student Mechanical Leader and Driver, Team 696 Circuit Breakers, 2002-2004
Reply With Quote
  #20   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-12-2017, 03:25 PM
Steven Smith Steven Smith is offline
Registered User
FRC #3005 (RoboChargers)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Rookie Year: 2013
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 251
Steven Smith has a reputation beyond reputeSteven Smith has a reputation beyond reputeSteven Smith has a reputation beyond reputeSteven Smith has a reputation beyond reputeSteven Smith has a reputation beyond reputeSteven Smith has a reputation beyond reputeSteven Smith has a reputation beyond reputeSteven Smith has a reputation beyond reputeSteven Smith has a reputation beyond reputeSteven Smith has a reputation beyond reputeSteven Smith has a reputation beyond repute
Re: FRC/CNC Class - CNC Machine

We did all of our custom gearboxes, custom drivetrain rails, lightening patterns, etc on my Tormach 770 this year. I was running a 1/4" lakeshore carbide endmill at ~8000 RPM, 20 IPM, 1/4" DOC and 30% WOC doing adaptive clearing strategies with helix entry. A ~7"x7" gearbox plate out of 1/4" Al, with holes drilled worked out to something like 20 minutes of cut time per plate. (with power drawbar)

That being said, I got a sweet deal on the 770 (brand new at 70% of the price), but if I was starting from scratch I'd probably go with the 1100. The 770 is nice that it has a 10K RPM spindle, which is great for being able to clear with smaller cutters, but I'd rather the 30-40% larger work area. I was having to do quite a number of setups and indexing to make my 7"x14" area work. Obviously, even the 1100 area is tiny compared to a real VMC, but it is also a $10K machine for hobby use, not a professional machine for true production. For FRC use, it is more of a machine than I am a machinist, and I found the major limiter was me... not the machine. A bigger machine could do faster work with less setup time, but not necessarily "better" work (for most FRC applications). If you take the time to properly probe/measure, it can easily hold the tolerances needed for things like bearing fits, chain runs without tensioners, etc, even over multiple setups to reach a distance.


Here are a few pictures of some Tormach work (minus the belly pan, done on our gantry mill)
Pictures/Video Link

Side note, the faceting of the holes is due to the 2D adaptive strategy settings (not a finish strategy). I finished the bearing holes with a 3/8" end mill contour pass with no faceting, snap fit on the bearings.
__________________
2013 - 2017 - Mentor - Robochargers 3005
2014 - 2017 - Mentor - FLL 5817 / 7913
2013 - Day I Die - Robot Fanatic

Last edited by Steven Smith : 03-12-2017 at 03:44 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #21   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-12-2017, 03:30 PM
alubin237's Avatar
alubin237 alubin237 is offline
Registered User
AKA: Andrew
FRC #0075 (Robo Raiders)
Team Role: Alumni
 
Join Date: May 2009
Rookie Year: 2008
Location: Hillsborough NJ
Posts: 12
alubin237 is a glorious beacon of lightalubin237 is a glorious beacon of lightalubin237 is a glorious beacon of lightalubin237 is a glorious beacon of lightalubin237 is a glorious beacon of lightalubin237 is a glorious beacon of light
Re: FRC/CNC Class - CNC Machine

Quote:
Originally Posted by sanddrag View Post
Why plunge an endmill when you can helix or ramp, and why only two flutes when you can run three?
As long as the tool is a center cutting endmill and your machine has enough torque for the material there is not much reason that you can't plunge. That being said I would always recommend a helical entry or ramping into the material when possible. It is a little easier on the tools but since FRC is not a production environment I doubt it would be much of a detriment.

The number of flutes that an endmill has effects a few major properties of the tool. The one everyone is familiar with is the feed that you can run the tool at, for a given surface footage. Two others that are often forgotten about are the core strength and chip removal capability.

The fewer number of flutes a tool has the better it is at clearing chips with or without coolant.

The core strength of the tool will also limit the feed rate you can run the tool at for a given volume of material that you are removing. The more flutes a tool has, MSC has a 16 flute tool, the more material you have in the core. This means it will be able to survive a more aggressive cut and the higher tool pressures associated with a harder material.

Aluminum is a walk in the park to machine, except for the fact that it likes galling. To prevent galling you need to evacuate the chips, hence the suggestion of a 2 flute tool. Using a coated tool will also help with this.

As for the original question on the thread. An option that I would encourage you to look into further would be a Bridgeport style knee mill that has a 2 axis proto track on it. You will be able to do 90-95% of what most teams machine in all of FRC on that machine. This machine will be more labor intensive to run than a 3 axis machine because you will need to set the depth manually. You only loose the ability to do surface machining which is a very advanced programming skill to learn. Most teams will not use this or can get away with not needing to use it. You should also be able to still use the machine as a manual mill.

I have been inactive lately and I would like to share my qualifications for this answer. I plan on getting involved again after graduation from college.

I have done extensive CNC programming and machining through a number of outlets. I was the main programmer for 2 years at Drexel for the FSAE team. We machined a lot of aluminum both 6061 and 7075. I have worked in a manufacturing plant running Swiss type multi-axis lathes. There I machined everything from stainless to medical grade titanium. And for my second and third Co-op, I worked as an Applications Engineer for Autodesk's CAM software PartMaker advising on machining practices and fixing customer files. I helped customers with machines that ranged in complexity from 2.5 axis mills and lathes to 13 axis turn mills.

Last edited by alubin237 : 03-12-2017 at 03:33 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #22   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-14-2017, 08:16 AM
balt_machinist balt_machinist is offline
Registered User
AKA: The Machinist
FRC #2537 (Space RAIDers)
Team Role: Alumni
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Rookie Year: 1990
Location: Baltimore City
Posts: 12
balt_machinist is an unknown quantity at this point
Talking Re: FRC/CNC Class - CNC Machine

Taught CIM for years... (PLTW TRAINED), and am now a CNC Applications Engineer for HAAS. (My post-graduate degree(s) are in vocational education...) A few things to consider:

Know the product. PLTW CIM

There is a lot crammed into this class, all focused on an exam at the end of the class used for student credit (if they choose at participating colleges). It's hard to articulate FIRST projects (it can be done), but you won't be solely focusing on FIRST within the class. The mills within the catalog can machine... but are not impressive within handling code (all I could do is engrave).

Look into creating a engineering design class. A lot of teachers teach one section of their own, or a hybrid of the ITTEA curricula.

In finding machines... EBAY

Get a small HAAS, or Kitamurra.

Create a database of simple... but repeatable machine codes (where all is needed is changing feed/tool speed and depth). I rarely use MasterCam in my shop. I prefer to know what I told my machine to do, as well as follow appropriate machining technique in creating tool paths.

A lot of schools are going to CNC routers, which are cool, but I do not know if they can handle tough metals.

Good luck, and have fun.

There is a great non-FIRST middle/high school machine lab in Wisconsin that has everything, but they created their shop as a business. Their rate is like $70/hr., whereas the pro rate within the DC area is $150/hr. It could help doing small jobs for the community at that rate to help if you lease a new machine.
Reply With Quote
  #23   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-21-2017, 02:14 PM
popnbrown's Avatar
popnbrown popnbrown is offline
FIRST 5125 HOTH Lead Mentor
AKA: Sravan S
FRC #5125 (Hawks on the Horizon)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Rookie Year: 2007
Location: Illinois
Posts: 374
popnbrown has a reputation beyond reputepopnbrown has a reputation beyond reputepopnbrown has a reputation beyond reputepopnbrown has a reputation beyond reputepopnbrown has a reputation beyond reputepopnbrown has a reputation beyond reputepopnbrown has a reputation beyond reputepopnbrown has a reputation beyond reputepopnbrown has a reputation beyond reputepopnbrown has a reputation beyond reputepopnbrown has a reputation beyond repute
Re: FRC/CNC Class - CNC Machine

Thanks for all the replies everyone. Tormach seems to get a good rep, and I think we're brand agnostic so I think either Tormach may be a good fit for us. They're also comparable price to the Intellitek machine. However, the 1100 seems to need a higher voltage which might rule it out.

I'm now debating between a Router and a Mill, but still probably leaning towards a mill.

I'd love to just do an engineering class, but the administration may make it conditional to implement PLTW CIM.

Any opinions on mill vs. router?
__________________
I am an employee of FIRST. However, the postings on this site are of my own perspective as a FIRST mentor and volunteer and do not necessarily reflect the views of FIRST.

FIRST Team 5125 Hawks on the Horizon Lead Mentor
FRC Team 4096 Ctrl-Z Former Mentor
FTC Team 5203 #19@! Former Mentor
FRC Team 1403 Cougar Robotics Alumni
Reply With Quote
  #24   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-21-2017, 02:29 PM
sanddrag sanddrag is offline
On to my 16th year in FRC
FRC #0696 (Circuit Breakers)
Team Role: Teacher
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Rookie Year: 2002
Location: Glendale, CA
Posts: 8,598
sanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond repute
Re: FRC/CNC Class - CNC Machine

Quote:
Originally Posted by popnbrown View Post
Any opinions on mill vs. router?
__________________
Teacher/Engineer/Machinist - Team 696 Circuit Breakers, 2011 - Present
Mentor/Engineer/Machinist, Team 968 RAWC, 2007-2010
Technical Mentor, Team 696 Circuit Breakers, 2005-2007
Student Mechanical Leader and Driver, Team 696 Circuit Breakers, 2002-2004
Reply With Quote
  #25   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-21-2017, 03:17 PM
JamesCH95's Avatar
JamesCH95 JamesCH95 is offline
Hardcore Dork
AKA: JCH
FRC #0095 (The Grasshoppers)
Team Role: Engineer
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Rookie Year: 2001
Location: Enfield, NH
Posts: 2,135
JamesCH95 has a reputation beyond reputeJamesCH95 has a reputation beyond reputeJamesCH95 has a reputation beyond reputeJamesCH95 has a reputation beyond reputeJamesCH95 has a reputation beyond reputeJamesCH95 has a reputation beyond reputeJamesCH95 has a reputation beyond reputeJamesCH95 has a reputation beyond reputeJamesCH95 has a reputation beyond reputeJamesCH95 has a reputation beyond reputeJamesCH95 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: FRC/CNC Class - CNC Machine

Quote:
Originally Posted by popnbrown View Post
Thanks for all the replies everyone. Tormach seems to get a good rep, and I think we're brand agnostic so I think either Tormach may be a good fit for us. They're also comparable price to the Intellitek machine. However, the 1100 seems to need a higher voltage which might rule it out.

I'm now debating between a Router and a Mill, but still probably leaning towards a mill.

I'd love to just do an engineering class, but the administration may make it conditional to implement PLTW CIM.

Any opinions on mill vs. router?


The Tormach only needs 220V @ 20A IIRC, less than my dryer. I have one in my garage. If you can't supply 220V... well... that's going to really cripple your growing room.

While a router and a mill operate in much the same way, they're used for fundamentally different types of operations. It's really nice to have both. Mills that can have the working envelope of a router are insanely expensive, just as routers with the same working tolerances as a decent mill are insanely expensive. With a modest example of each you get much of the capabilities of one super machine for a small fraction of the cost, plus a better student:machine ratio.
__________________
Theory is a nice place, I'd like to go there one day, I hear everything works there.

Maturity is knowing you were an idiot, common sense is trying to not be an idiot, wisdom is knowing that you will still be an idiot.
Reply With Quote
  #26   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-21-2017, 06:27 PM
asid61's Avatar
asid61 asid61 is offline
Also 299 mentor
AKA: Anand Rajamani
FRC #1072 (Harker Robotics and Valkyrie Robotics)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Rookie Year: 2013
Location: Cupertino, CA
Posts: 2,471
asid61 has a reputation beyond reputeasid61 has a reputation beyond reputeasid61 has a reputation beyond reputeasid61 has a reputation beyond reputeasid61 has a reputation beyond reputeasid61 has a reputation beyond reputeasid61 has a reputation beyond reputeasid61 has a reputation beyond reputeasid61 has a reputation beyond reputeasid61 has a reputation beyond reputeasid61 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: FRC/CNC Class - CNC Machine

Mills for learning, router for making those big plates everyone loves.
__________________
Team 1072 2017-present
Team 299 2017-present
Team 115 2013-2016



Reply With Quote
  #27   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-21-2017, 06:51 PM
mman1506 mman1506 is offline
Hater of Tiny Molex Connectors
AKA: Marcus Quintilian
FRC #0865 (Wrap7)
Team Role: Alumni
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Rookie Year: 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 918
mman1506 has a reputation beyond reputemman1506 has a reputation beyond reputemman1506 has a reputation beyond reputemman1506 has a reputation beyond reputemman1506 has a reputation beyond reputemman1506 has a reputation beyond reputemman1506 has a reputation beyond reputemman1506 has a reputation beyond reputemman1506 has a reputation beyond reputemman1506 has a reputation beyond reputemman1506 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: FRC/CNC Class - CNC Machine

Quote:
Originally Posted by popnbrown View Post
Thanks for all the replies everyone. Tormach seems to get a good rep, and I think we're brand agnostic so I think either Tormach may be a good fit for us. They're also comparable price to the Intellitek machine. However, the 1100 seems to need a higher voltage which might rule it out.

I'm now debating between a Router and a Mill, but still probably leaning towards a mill.

I'd love to just do an engineering class, but the administration may make it conditional to implement PLTW CIM.

Any opinions on mill vs. router?
We have both, in my experience it's far easier to find a sponsor who will cut large 2D sheet metal parts (laser cutter, water jet, punch press) like you would on a router than one who will do 3D+2.5D "milling machine style" parts due to the economics involved. I've also found a CNC mill to be a better teaching tool for students as you have more opportunity to experiment with different tool paths and speeds/feeds. Mills are also generally much quieter. Both is best obviously.
__________________
2014-2015: FRC 865 Warp7 Team Captain
2017: Free Agent Mentor

Last edited by mman1506 : 03-21-2017 at 06:54 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #28   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-21-2017, 07:23 PM
anchorlabs anchorlabs is offline
Registered User
no team
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Rookie Year: 2013
Location: Worcester, MA
Posts: 16
anchorlabs is a glorious beacon of lightanchorlabs is a glorious beacon of lightanchorlabs is a glorious beacon of lightanchorlabs is a glorious beacon of lightanchorlabs is a glorious beacon of light
Re: FRC/CNC Class - CNC Machine

I'd second/third/fourth the recommendation to get a Tormach for FRC use. They are great machines for getting started and educational use. They won't compare to a Okuma, Toyoda, or even a Haas, but they can usually get the job done. The biggest limitations you will run into are horsepower, rigidity, and table size but most of these can be overcome. If you're looking for something bigger or the next step up, I'd highly recommend looking at a Haas MiniMill. Used they are a bit more expensive than a Tormach but they are beefier machines. More HP, flood coolant, built-in enclosure, probing, and CAT-40 taper. That being said, at the end of the day, everything will be a bit more expensive (i.e. CAT-40 tool holders are much pricier than TTS tool holders) and a MiniMill is overkill for a majority of FRC teams.

I'd highly recommend getting/making an enclosure regardless of what machine you get. Not keeping all your chips and coolant in confined area is something you will regret in the future while you are cleaning up.

Also, don't forget to include the cost of tooling when pricing out a machine (it ends up being a lot more than you would think).

If you have any questions as you are getting started (either picking a machine, designing a curriculum, or just machining in general), we'd be happy to hop on the phone/email and help you out.

- Sam

Last edited by anchorlabs : 03-21-2017 at 07:31 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #29   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-21-2017, 07:53 PM
dirtbikerxz's Avatar
dirtbikerxz dirtbikerxz is offline
Captain | Driver | Junior
AKA: Rohit Gondi
FRC #3991 (KnightVision)
Team Role: Driver
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Rookie Year: 2015
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
Posts: 679
dirtbikerxz has a brilliant futuredirtbikerxz has a brilliant futuredirtbikerxz has a brilliant futuredirtbikerxz has a brilliant futuredirtbikerxz has a brilliant futuredirtbikerxz has a brilliant futuredirtbikerxz has a brilliant futuredirtbikerxz has a brilliant futuredirtbikerxz has a brilliant futuredirtbikerxz has a brilliant futuredirtbikerxz has a brilliant future
Re: FRC/CNC Class - CNC Machine

Quote:
Originally Posted by cad321 View Post
Unfortunately our head mentor (the schools shop teacher) doesn't believe in coolant so that puts a bit of a bottleneck on our speeds.
but but but..... huh?
__________________
Team 3991: Driver since freshman (2015-), Captain since sophomore (2016-)
"The human condition is not perfect. We are not perfect specimens, any of us. We're not robots." - Michael Ovitz
My posts may or may not reflect the views of my team, they are my opinions, and mine alone.
Reply With Quote
  #30   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-21-2017, 08:13 PM
scottandme's Avatar
scottandme scottandme is offline
Registered User
AKA: Scott Meredith
FRC #5895 (Peddie School Robotics)
Team Role: Teacher
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Rookie Year: 2009
Location: Hightstown, NJ
Posts: 249
scottandme has a reputation beyond reputescottandme has a reputation beyond reputescottandme has a reputation beyond reputescottandme has a reputation beyond reputescottandme has a reputation beyond reputescottandme has a reputation beyond reputescottandme has a reputation beyond reputescottandme has a reputation beyond reputescottandme has a reputation beyond reputescottandme has a reputation beyond reputescottandme has a reputation beyond repute
Re: FRC/CNC Class - CNC Machine

Ran a Tormach 1100, currently running a Haas TM-2P. The 1100 is fine, but isn't at the same level as even the entry level Haas machines. The Intelitek machines are overpriced trash, a $2,000 router is a better option by far.

If money's an issue - look at the Haas Mini Mill-EDU. It's stripped down, but starts at only 19k. Haas also gives discounts on their regular model line as well.

http://www.haascnc.com/whatsnew-MINI....asp#gsc.tab=0
__________________
Team 2590 Mentor [2009-2014]
Team 5895 Mentor [2016-Present]
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:42 AM.

The Chief Delphi Forums are sponsored by Innovation First International, Inc.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © Chief Delphi