OCCRA
Go to Post If you ever find yourself thinking that you are the most brilliant person in a situation, you are doing something wrong. - EricVanWyk [more]
Home
Go Back   Chief Delphi > FIRST > General Forum
CD-Media   CD-Spy  
portal register members calendar search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read FAQ rules

 
Reply
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
  #1   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 06-07-2018, 01:20 PM
dragonriderx's Avatar
dragonriderx dragonriderx is offline
Registered User
FRC #4611
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Ohio
Posts: 25
dragonriderx is an unknown quantity at this point
Restoring Old Table Saw

My team got an old broken down table saw and I got it up and running but now I actually want to like clean it up. I most of the rust off with sandpaper but the paint is extremely worn and I'm thinking of redoing the paint (it was like a turquoise color). What's the process for painting metal like this like? What paint should I use? What primer? If you can just point me in the right direction it'd be a huge help
Reply With Quote
  #2   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 06-07-2018, 01:52 PM
FrankJ's Avatar
FrankJ FrankJ is offline
Robot Mentor
AKA: The Bearded ONe
FRC #2974 (WALT)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Rookie Year: 2009
Location: Marietta GA
Posts: 2,505
FrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Restoring Old Table Saw

If any table saw didn't have the proper guards, I would not let any student use it. At a work site I would cut the plug off. It is good for a $5000+ OSHA fine. First offense.

Any way for painting, it really depends on how deep down the rabbit whole you want to go. The surfaces need to be completely clean and oil free. Any loose paint needs to be removed. This is just cosmetic, but fair the painted surface into the bare metal so that you don't have lines. Sand everything with 150-200 grit sand paper or wire brush everything. Treat any rusted metal with rust restorer. (Find it on the hardware store paint aisle)

The simple paint solution is hardware store enamel spray paint. Use the same brand of primer and paint.
__________________
If you don't know what you should hook up then you should read a data sheet

Last edited by FrankJ : 06-07-2018 at 02:15 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #3   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 06-07-2018, 04:42 PM
hrench's Avatar
hrench hrench is offline
mechanical build mentor
AKA: Bob Hrenchir
FRC #1108 (Panther Robotics)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Rookie Year: 2010
Location: Paola, KS
Posts: 378
hrench has a brilliant futurehrench has a brilliant futurehrench has a brilliant futurehrench has a brilliant futurehrench has a brilliant futurehrench has a brilliant futurehrench has a brilliant futurehrench has a brilliant futurehrench has a brilliant futurehrench has a brilliant futurehrench has a brilliant future
Re: Restoring Old Table Saw

just to add to the very-good advice from FrankJ, I recommend you paint it like you were repairing a bad area of a paint-job on a car.

1. Use wet-or-dry sandpaper (the black kind), with a generous amount of water while sanding. Sand all rust off if possible. Sand all places where bare metal and remaining paint meet until no edge of old paint is present. Dry it completely so no new rust occurs.

2. When you prime it, I recommend you buy 'filler' primer sold in the automotive department of most auto-parts stores and Walmarts. It will fill any galvanic pits that may have been caused by rust.

3. After your filler-primer is dry, you can sand again with a higher number, 400- or 600 grit, again wet-or-dry to make it even more smooth. dry completely probably overnight.

4. go over it with 'tack cloth' before spraying the real paint. You can rattle-can or use enamel with a sprayer. It all depends on how nice you want it.

Also, on a table saw, often you don't paint the table. Mostly they stay bare. spray it with WD 40 when the paint job is done to prevent rust. Also don't paint any fence or slide parts that weren't painted to begin with.
Reply With Quote
  #4   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 06-07-2018, 05:38 PM
ctt956's Avatar
ctt956 ctt956 is offline
Mostly Legal Volunteer
no team
Team Role: Alumni
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Rookie Year: 2016
Location: Planet Earth
Posts: 1,050
ctt956 has much to be proud ofctt956 has much to be proud ofctt956 has much to be proud ofctt956 has much to be proud ofctt956 has much to be proud ofctt956 has much to be proud ofctt956 has much to be proud ofctt956 has much to be proud ofctt956 has much to be proud of
Re: Restoring Old Table Saw

+1 to what FrankJ said about the safety features. Both posts have good painting tips. You may consider using a wire brush on a power drill or an angle grinder, and a die grinder or rotary tool for the tight spaces. Before removing any paint however, you should check the paint for lead. I'm not sure how old this saw is, but lead paint hasn't been banned for industrial use, meaning that if it's an industrial-grade machine, it could still have lead paint even if it was made after 1977. If it's consumer grade and newer than that, it's probably lead-free, but I would check anyway; a simple test kit is only $10. If it does test positive, it's probably best to have a professional remove the paint. While there are supposedly "safe" DIY lead paint removal methods, I wouldn't want to attempt it.
__________________

"You know, it's amazing how many things you can take apart with just one ordinary screwdriver!" - Calvin, from Calvin and Hobbes
"There's nothing a little duct tape and surgical tubing can't accomplish." - Sheldon J. Plankton
Reply With Quote
  #5   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 06-07-2018, 07:17 PM
philso philso is offline
Mentor
no team
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Rookie Year: 2009
Location: Houston, Tx
Posts: 1,677
philso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Restoring Old Table Saw

Doing a search on Google with terms such as "restore old table saw" will yield a lot of websites and YouTube videos showing how various people have restored their old saws. There is a lot of old shop equipment out there that is worth restoring and a lot that is not.
Reply With Quote
  #6   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 06-07-2018, 08:04 PM
sanddrag sanddrag is offline
On to my 18th year in FRC
FRC #0696 (Circuit Breakers)
Team Role: Teacher
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Rookie Year: 2002
Location: Glendale, CA
Posts: 8,826
sanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond reputesanddrag has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Restoring Old Table Saw

My recommendation is to sell it and buy a new table saw. Time is money, and a table saw is arguably the most dangerous piece of equipment in the shop.
__________________
Teacher/Engineer/Machinist - Team 696 Circuit Breakers, 2011 - Present
Mentor/Engineer/Machinist, Team 968 RAWC, 2007-2010
Technical Mentor, Team 696 Circuit Breakers, 2005-2007
Student Mechanical Leader and Driver, Team 696 Circuit Breakers, 2002-2004
Reply With Quote
  #7   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 06-07-2018, 09:50 PM
Chief Hedgehog's Avatar
Chief Hedgehog Chief Hedgehog is offline
Mentor
FRC #4607 (C.I.S.)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: May 2013
Rookie Year: 2012
Location: Becker, Minnesota
Posts: 870
Chief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Restoring Old Table Saw

I am going to echo some of the others - this seems like an exercise in futility that you may severely regret later. I understand that money may be tight at times, but a table saw is not a tool that I would take into the shop second hand. Just not worth the safety concerns.
__________________
Minnesota Robotics Coaches Association
Central Minnesota Robotics Hub
FRC 4607, C.I.S.
"Innovation cannot happen in isolation"
Reply With Quote
  #8   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 06-08-2018, 12:17 AM
MrForbes's Avatar
MrForbes MrForbes is offline
Registered User
AKA: Jim
FRC #1726 (N.E.R.D.S.)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Rookie Year: 2006
Location: Sierra Vista AZ
Posts: 6,402
MrForbes has a reputation beyond reputeMrForbes has a reputation beyond reputeMrForbes has a reputation beyond reputeMrForbes has a reputation beyond reputeMrForbes has a reputation beyond reputeMrForbes has a reputation beyond reputeMrForbes has a reputation beyond reputeMrForbes has a reputation beyond reputeMrForbes has a reputation beyond reputeMrForbes has a reputation beyond reputeMrForbes has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Restoring Old Table Saw

About 35 years ago, I got an old table saw from my grandfather. It had spent most of it's life in the southern most part of the country, so it had quite a bit of rust. It is cast iron, which doesn't help. And then we stored it in flaky sheds for years. About 25 years ago, I spent some time cleaning it up. I didn't repaint it, just cleaned the rust off the machined surfaces, and set up the motor, belt, and added a power switch and cord.

I've used it a few times in the past ten years (after another newer free table saw I got finally died). The old saw is not very powerful, and it's dangerous, but it was my grandpa's, and I like it.

I wouldn't dream of taking it to school for students to use.

As for the painting recommendations...don't worry too much about giving it a perfect paint job. It's just an old saw. I would not bother with automotive paint, I would not even bother with primer. Just spray can enamel, after some quick washing and sanding. Masking before you paint would be a good idea, and possibly do some careful sanding after the paint is fully dry, to bring out the contrast with the machined surfaces. Of course, without pictures, we can only guess about what your saw looks like, they have changed design over the decades.

here's a catalog picture of my saw, more or less...circa 1968....I guess that makes it 50 years old.

Reply With Quote
  #9   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 06-08-2018, 12:18 PM
Brian Selle's Avatar
Brian Selle Brian Selle is offline
Software/Mechanical Mentor
FRC #3310 (Black Hawk Robotics)
Team Role: Engineer
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Rookie Year: 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 232
Brian Selle has a reputation beyond reputeBrian Selle has a reputation beyond reputeBrian Selle has a reputation beyond reputeBrian Selle has a reputation beyond reputeBrian Selle has a reputation beyond reputeBrian Selle has a reputation beyond reputeBrian Selle has a reputation beyond reputeBrian Selle has a reputation beyond reputeBrian Selle has a reputation beyond reputeBrian Selle has a reputation beyond reputeBrian Selle has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Restoring Old Table Saw

It all depends on what kind of saw it is and its condition. If it's a cabinet saw like a Delta Unisaw or a Powermatic model 66 then likely it's worth restoring, otherwise I would pass for reasons others have mentioned. An old cabinet saw can be restored to be as good or better than current models. You can retrofit better guards, fences, splitters, and in some cases, a riving knife to virtually any age cabinet saw.

Tablesaws are scary dangerous and the only one I would consider allowing students to use in a school environment is a SawStop. Its riving knife and the electronic blade stop set it apart from the rest. Fingers are very difficult to replace.
__________________
http://www.team3310.com/
Reply With Quote
  #10   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 06-08-2018, 12:41 PM
chadr03's Avatar
chadr03 chadr03 is online now
Registered User
FRC #2582 (PantherBots)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Rookie Year: 2010
Location: Lufkin, TX
Posts: 134
chadr03 is a splendid one to beholdchadr03 is a splendid one to beholdchadr03 is a splendid one to beholdchadr03 is a splendid one to beholdchadr03 is a splendid one to beholdchadr03 is a splendid one to beholdchadr03 is a splendid one to behold
Re: Restoring Old Table Saw

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Selle View Post
...one I would consider allowing students to use in a school environment is a SawStop. Its riving knife and the electronic blade stop set it apart from the rest. Fingers are very difficult to replace.
We love our SawStop. It is a great saw with some neat safety features. The only issue is that it doesn't like treated lumber (The moisture in it makes it think it has hit something it shouldn't and the blade goes into brake mode).
Reply With Quote
  #11   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 06-11-2018, 04:42 PM
DonRotolo's Avatar
DonRotolo DonRotolo is offline
Broke a hundred!
FRC #0832
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Rookie Year: 2005
Location: Atlanta GA
Posts: 7,376
DonRotolo has a reputation beyond reputeDonRotolo has a reputation beyond reputeDonRotolo has a reputation beyond reputeDonRotolo has a reputation beyond reputeDonRotolo has a reputation beyond reputeDonRotolo has a reputation beyond reputeDonRotolo has a reputation beyond reputeDonRotolo has a reputation beyond reputeDonRotolo has a reputation beyond reputeDonRotolo has a reputation beyond reputeDonRotolo has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Restoring Old Table Saw

Painting: Rubbing alcohol (91%, sold at the pharmacy) makes an excellent cleaner & degreaser. use it well-ventilated, and buy a new brush to scrub the old paint. The surface is likely rough cast iron. Then rattle-can it in whatever color you like. Primer very optional. Blue masking tape is good.

Never paint the table surface; keep it lightly oiled to prevent rust.

My old team has an old table saw: Only mentors could use it.
__________________

*All comments are mine and do not represent my place of employment*
Reply With Quote
  #12   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 06-11-2018, 07:13 PM
mrmummert's Avatar
mrmummert mrmummert is offline
Registered User
AKA: hank
FRC #1610 (Blackwater Robotics ...ready for a water game since 1999)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Rookie Year: 2005
Location: franklin
Posts: 390
mrmummert is a splendid one to beholdmrmummert is a splendid one to beholdmrmummert is a splendid one to beholdmrmummert is a splendid one to beholdmrmummert is a splendid one to beholdmrmummert is a splendid one to beholdmrmummert is a splendid one to behold
Send a message via Yahoo to mrmummert
Re: Restoring Old Table Saw

We have a old late 1970's Sears Craftsman table saw with the cable drive that has served us very well. It was donated to us and yes it has its guards. We don't allow ANY of the students to use it.

BTW..here is a good site if your into old power tools.
http://vintagemachinery.org/

Restoring old Power tools is a hobby of mine. See below

This is a 1942 Sears Craftsman table saw i restored..the guard was
almost impossible to find. I had Serwin-Williams match the original
paint.
http://www.vintagemachinery.org/phot...es/21628-A.jpg

This is a before and after of another Sears Craftsman saw i have. From 1952.

Before http://www.vintagemachinery.org/phot...es/21482-E.jpg

After http://www.vintagemachinery.org/phot...es/21482-A.jpg
http://www.vintagemachinery.org/phot...es/21482-D.jpg

(stand was later replaced with a correct one in the second restored picture)
__________________
winner VCU regional 2006,2013,2014,2015
winner CHS district Hampton Roads 2017
winner CHS district Central Virginia 2018

Last edited by mrmummert : 06-11-2018 at 07:18 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #13   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 06-12-2018, 12:24 AM
Chief Hedgehog's Avatar
Chief Hedgehog Chief Hedgehog is offline
Mentor
FRC #4607 (C.I.S.)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: May 2013
Rookie Year: 2012
Location: Becker, Minnesota
Posts: 870
Chief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond reputeChief Hedgehog has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Restoring Old Table Saw

If you are looking to upkeep old machines - FRC or not - I have found ereplacementparts.com to be a great resource.

Again, I would not bring in old machines to a place where students are apt to use them... I have been there before, never again.
__________________
Minnesota Robotics Coaches Association
Central Minnesota Robotics Hub
FRC 4607, C.I.S.
"Innovation cannot happen in isolation"
Reply With Quote
  #14   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 06-12-2018, 07:52 AM
FrankJ's Avatar
FrankJ FrankJ is offline
Robot Mentor
AKA: The Bearded ONe
FRC #2974 (WALT)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Rookie Year: 2009
Location: Marietta GA
Posts: 2,505
FrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond reputeFrankJ has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Restoring Old Table Saw

On the other side of the coin. Old machines tend to be more heavily built which aides in stability and rigidity. Many better built than modern day counterparts. The problem is in the old days real craftsman didn't need no safety guards so they tended to be removed and lost. Hence many earned nick names such as Stubby, Leftey, Sparky, One Eye, and so on.
__________________
If you don't know what you should hook up then you should read a data sheet
Reply With Quote
  #15   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 06-12-2018, 12:29 PM
GDG 2337 GDG 2337 is offline
Registered User
FRC #2337 (ENGINerds)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Rookie Year: 2003
Location: us
Posts: 45
GDG 2337 has a spectacular aura aboutGDG 2337 has a spectacular aura about
Re: Restoring Old Table Saw

I was gifted an old delta unisaw without the guards. In most cases older (35+) saws did not come with what is now considered modern safety features such as a riving knife. Adding modern safety features to an old saw can be done however it is expensive. The alternative is being called Stubby, Lefty, Sparky, One Eye, and so on. I equipped my old saw with the safety features applicable to the time period, by no means would I consider it safe to use by the inexperienced. Now that it is cleaned up and tuned up, it cuts superior to modern saws.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:22 PM.

The Chief Delphi Forums are sponsored by Innovation First International, Inc.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © Chief Delphi