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Unread 11-20-2017, 10:57 PM
Ryan-Greenblatt Ryan-Greenblatt is offline
A foolish programmer
FRC #0900 (Zebracorns)
Team Role: Programmer
 
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Breaker Modeling

With the popularity of 775 pros and generally high current robots modeling the 120 Amp breaker* seems like a good idea. By using the 120 amp breaker data sheet, I made a function (if you want exact specifications just ask) to map any current greater than 120 amps to the lower bound of how long it will take the breaker to pop**. Then, to figure out how close a breaker is to popping, I can just sum dt/function(current) where function is as described in the sentence before***. So, if the breaker would take 12 seconds to pop at 240 amps and 4 seconds to pop at 360 amps, then if it was at 240 amps for 2 seconds and 360 amps for 1 second it would be 43% "popped" (2/12+1/4). However, this model doesn't account at all for the situation where current is below the rated maximum. Does anyone have any data or ideas on what occurs in contexts such as when the breaker is at 360 amps for 3 seconds then at 40 amps for 2 seconds then at 360 amps for another 2 seconds? Any data or better ideas on how to generally model breakers would also be great.


*The model also should work for any of the PDP legal breakers as they also work (from my understanding) by having a piece of metal deform due to heating up from high current. Their data sheets are also easily available.
**This assumes an additive property which hopefully isn't too unrealistic.
***That function can also pretty easily take into account temperature derating , that calculation assumes around 25-35 degrees C
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