OCCRA
Go to Post Maybe this is something we should put on the backs of our shirts: "beware - this person will stand up and cheer for other teams during FIRST award ceremonies". - Andy Baker [more]
Home
Go Back   Chief Delphi > FIRST > General Forum
CD-Media  
portal register members calendar search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read FAQ rules

 
Reply
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 3 votes, 4.33 average. Display Modes
  #1   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-27-2018, 11:27 AM
TLHPoE TLHPoE is offline
Registered User
AKA: Kavin Phan
FRC #6750 (Pack Attack)
Team Role: Programmer
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Rookie Year: 2017
Location: Stockbridge, Georgia
Posts: 19
TLHPoE is an unknown quantity at this point
Becoming A Mentor

I'm currently a senior on a second-year team, and I am looking to mentor a team next season. I'll be starting my BS in CS, but I think I have a good enough understanding of Java (might be Dunning-Kruger) to lend help to teams. Is there a specific place to look for teams who need help?

As for my own team, I thought about it and decided against it for various reasons.
Reply With Quote
  #2   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-27-2018, 11:32 AM
KevinG's Avatar
KevinG KevinG is offline
Chesapeake SLRI/Friendly Giant
AKA: Kevin
FRC #3650 (RoboRaptors)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Rookie Year: 1998
Location: Maryland
Posts: 171
KevinG has a reputation beyond reputeKevinG has a reputation beyond reputeKevinG has a reputation beyond reputeKevinG has a reputation beyond reputeKevinG has a reputation beyond reputeKevinG has a reputation beyond reputeKevinG has a reputation beyond reputeKevinG has a reputation beyond reputeKevinG has a reputation beyond reputeKevinG has a reputation beyond reputeKevinG has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Becoming A Mentor

Quote:
Originally Posted by TLHPoE View Post
I'm currently a senior on a second-year team, and I am looking to mentor a team next season. I'll be starting my BS in CS, but I think I have a good enough understanding of Java (might be Dunning-Kruger) to lend help to teams. Is there a specific place to look for teams who need help?

As for my own team, I thought about it and decided against it for various reasons.
Honestly I would recommend taking a year off to get used to college first. It's a MASSIVE transition from high school and you may discover that you simply don't have the time or energy for both. If you want to stay connected to FIRST you could volunteer at events (particularly as a CSA given your field of study). That also gives you a chance to identify local teams which might need help. Spend the year learning Java (maybe a Java class) as a way to dovetail your interests with professional development.
Reply With Quote
  #3   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-27-2018, 11:39 AM
Dezion's Avatar
Dezion Dezion is offline
Registered User
no team (T-Rex)
Team Role: Alumni
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Rookie Year: 2015
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 86
Dezion will become famous soon enoughDezion will become famous soon enough
Re: Becoming A Mentor

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinG View Post
Honestly I would recommend taking a year off to get used to college first. It's a MASSIVE transition from high school and you may discover that you simply don't have the time or energy for both. If you want to stay connected to FIRST you could volunteer at events (particularly as a CSA given your field of study). That also gives you a chance to identify local teams which might need help. Spend the year learning Java (maybe a Java class) as a way to dovetail your interests with professional development.
I agree with this.

Personally, I graduated from my team last year after spending two years on it as the strategy sub-team leader. I'm now in college attending NCSU. College is a pretty big transition from high school, especially in time management. Managing your coursework (especially if you go above 16 credit hours) can be difficult, especially when you find you want to join about 15 different clubs and groups on campus.

Regarding coursework, taking a Java course (or two) your freshman shouldn't be too difficult to get into from my experience. I took a computer systems course my first semester and MATLAB my second semester (had the opportunity to take python or java).
Reply With Quote
  #4   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-27-2018, 11:42 AM
marshall's Avatar
marshall marshall is online now
"Who's Marshall?"
FRC #0900 (The Zebracorns)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Rookie Year: 2003
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 3,063
marshall has a reputation beyond reputemarshall has a reputation beyond reputemarshall has a reputation beyond reputemarshall has a reputation beyond reputemarshall has a reputation beyond reputemarshall has a reputation beyond reputemarshall has a reputation beyond reputemarshall has a reputation beyond reputemarshall has a reputation beyond reputemarshall has a reputation beyond reputemarshall has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Becoming A Mentor

Quote:
Originally Posted by TLHPoE View Post
I'm currently a senior on a second-year team, and I am looking to mentor a team next season.
Don't.
__________________
"La mejor salsa del mundo es la hambre" - Miguel de Cervantes
"The future is unwritten" - Joe Strummer
"Simplify, then add lightness" - Colin Chapman
Clarke's Laws
Reply With Quote
  #5   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-27-2018, 11:45 AM
ARaulinaitis ARaulinaitis is offline
Registered User
FRC #4999 (Momentum Robotics)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Rookie Year: 2015
Location: Long Beach, CA
Posts: 146
ARaulinaitis is just really niceARaulinaitis is just really niceARaulinaitis is just really niceARaulinaitis is just really nice
Re: Becoming A Mentor

I think a lot of students don't quite understand what mentoring will really be like (and mentor roles/responsibilities varies team-to-team). Unfortunately, a lot of students return as "alumni mentors" but only stick around for a year or two. If you look at the mentor parades at events, there are toooons of 1st year mentors (both alumni and industry mentors), and the number drops sharply as you get to 2-4 and beyond.

If you feel that you have good experience that you will be able to pass on to future students and be able to help them understand and complete the things needed for FRC, then consider finding a team near your college.

I didn't start mentoring until after college, but here's what my experience was (Mechanical Engineering). Freshman and Sophomore year: mostly Gen-Eds so I had a decent amount of free time and could have mentored a team. Junior and Senior year got a lot more busy with classes, labs, research, homework, etc. and there's no way I would have had time to mentor a team.

So if you do decide to mentor in college, my advice would be to be fully prepared to take a break during your Jr. and Sr. years to focus on school, and then possibly come back after you graduate.
__________________
Don't limit others to the level of your own creativity.

Spec sheets are your friend.

A problem that you don't want to solve is an opportunity to better yourself.
Reply With Quote
  #6   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-27-2018, 11:45 AM
Dwight_2's Avatar
Dwight_2 Dwight_2 is offline
Alumni
AKA: Dwight Howard, II
FRC #5842 (Royal Robotics)
Team Role: Alumni
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Rookie Year: 2016
Location: New port Richey, FL
Posts: 159
Dwight_2 is a splendid one to beholdDwight_2 is a splendid one to beholdDwight_2 is a splendid one to beholdDwight_2 is a splendid one to beholdDwight_2 is a splendid one to beholdDwight_2 is a splendid one to beholdDwight_2 is a splendid one to behold
Re: Becoming A Mentor

I would have to say after doing exactly what you are talking about, going from being a team leader in high school on a second-year team to mentoring my first year in college has been a bit rough. It's stressful and hard to establish priorities. I would also recommend volunteering at events because you can stay involved but not jump into the deep end of being an adult leader.

That being said I have two recommendations if you want to go crazy and mentor, one do not mentor your team, and two stays away from being a head mentor of your skill set or the only one.

You do not want to become a mentor for your own team because the friendships and particular relationships between you and other team members will become extremely stressed if you are trying to transition from friend to adult leader... it just doesn't go well.

If you decide to mentor don't be the only one of your skill set, there are very very few people that will have a large enough knowledge of there field. There are hundreds of ways to build, program, design, and use things. You will not no matter how much time you've spent in FIRST as a student know enough to teach others the skills they need. I'm sorry but I know from experience.
__________________
Systems Integration supervisor, CAD team, Drive team, Programming team (2016)
Student team Co-Leader, Documentation Chair, Drive Team (2017)
2017 Lone Star Regional Winner
(3284, 5842, 6547)
Mentor iRam Robotics 7194 (2018)
"It Doesn't Get Easier. You Just Get Better."
Reply With Quote
  #7   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-27-2018, 11:47 AM
Boltman Boltman is offline
Strategy/Rules/Scouting/Volunteer
AKA: Tom Byrne
FRC #5137 (Iron Kodiaks)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Rookie Year: 2014
Location: San Diego
Posts: 1,366
Boltman has a brilliant futureBoltman has a brilliant futureBoltman has a brilliant futureBoltman has a brilliant futureBoltman has a brilliant futureBoltman has a brilliant futureBoltman has a brilliant futureBoltman has a brilliant futureBoltman has a brilliant futureBoltman has a brilliant futureBoltman has a brilliant future
Re: Becoming A Mentor

My son was a founding drive team member on our first year team and became a mentor in our second year ...he loves it and leads the builders along with the lead engineer student then he is usually our drive coach if not away for military service.. this is on the same team he was a senior on. He's a huge asset to our team and all the students past three years have always looked up to him. His skills and in game knowledge are assets to incoming new members.

He finds time to do it along with college and military service and two jobs.
So if it calls to you...do it. Do what you want.

Otherwise don't, not every senior has time or passion to continue as an FRC mentor.

He does it 4 month out of the year during "robot season"
__________________


Iron Kodiaks Team #5137 San Marcos, CA
2018 Orange County Elimination Alliance (5477.5209) QF
2017 Ventura Captain 3 (8, 3882) QF
2016 Central Valley Captain 2 (973, 2135) SF
2015 Ventura Elimination Alliances (696, 1836) SF
2014 San Diego Rookie All-Star Galileo Division
San Diego (Home regional/practice days) : Not chosen '18 Elimination Alliances:'17 (399, 968) SF ,'16 (1159, 812) SF , '15 (3021, 1772) QF

Volunteer @ Orange County 2016, 2017, 2018 Ventura 2018

Last edited by Boltman : 03-27-2018 at 12:00 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-27-2018, 11:47 AM
Johncvt Johncvt is offline
Registered User
AKA: John Maten
FRC #0910 (Foley Freeze)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Rookie Year: 2001
Location: Royal Oak, MI
Posts: 6
Johncvt is an unknown quantity at this point
Re: Becoming A Mentor

I would suggest another alternative would be to volunteer to help out an FTC team. Bringing your experience from FRC along with a knowledge of programming would be a huge help. It is also easier because there is more of an age difference and it is easier for the students to identify you as a mentor instead of a "fifth year senior" which could be the view of high school students.
Reply With Quote
  #9   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-27-2018, 11:53 AM
Billfred's Avatar
Billfred Billfred is offline
Another day, gotta give 'em hell
AKA: It's burning straight through the dark...
FRC #1293 (Pandamaniacs); FTC #11444 (Garnet Squadron) (Also, CD mod.)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Rookie Year: 2004
Location: The Shadow Realm
Posts: 9,680
Billfred has a reputation beyond reputeBillfred has a reputation beyond reputeBillfred has a reputation beyond reputeBillfred has a reputation beyond reputeBillfred has a reputation beyond reputeBillfred has a reputation beyond reputeBillfred has a reputation beyond reputeBillfred has a reputation beyond reputeBillfred has a reputation beyond reputeBillfred has a reputation beyond reputeBillfred has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Becoming A Mentor

Quote:
Originally Posted by marshall View Post
Don't.
Marshall with the succinct answers here.

I tell seniors: go volunteer at an event next year. It's three days, it's contained, they feed you, and it's a good way to get your fix.

I didn't practice that when I graduated, and yeah, it's awkward to be right back on a team run by the teacher who taught you freshman pre-chemistry. It's now a rule on 1293.
__________________
William "Billfred" Leverette - Gamecock/Jessica Boucher victim/Owner/Director of Bricks 4 Kidz in Columbia, SC.

2004-2006: FRC 1293 (D5 Robotics) - Student, Mentor, Coach
2007-2009: FRC 1618 (Capital Robotics) - Mentor, Coach
2009-2013: FRC 2815 (Los Pollos Locos) - Mentor, Coach - Palmetto '09, Peachtree '11, Palmetto '11, Palmetto '12
2010: FRC 1398 (Keenan Robo-Raiders) - Mentor - Palmetto '10
2014-2016: FRC 4901 (Garnet Squadron) - Co-Founder and Head Bot Coach - Orlando '14, SCRIW '16
2017: FRC 5402 (Iron Kings) - Mentor, Coach (oh, and I worked at AndyMark during this time)
2018-: FRC 1293 (Pandamaniacs) - Mentor

117 events (more than will fit in a ChiefDelphi signature), 15 seasons, over 74,500 miles, and still on a mission from Bob.
Rule #1: Do not die. Rule #2: Be respectful. Rule #3: Be safe. Rule #4: Follow the handbook.
Reply With Quote
  #10   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-27-2018, 11:59 AM
GreyingJay GreyingJay is offline
we'll fix it in the pit
FRC #2706 (Merge Robotics)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Rookie Year: 2015
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 1,268
GreyingJay has a reputation beyond reputeGreyingJay has a reputation beyond reputeGreyingJay has a reputation beyond reputeGreyingJay has a reputation beyond reputeGreyingJay has a reputation beyond reputeGreyingJay has a reputation beyond reputeGreyingJay has a reputation beyond reputeGreyingJay has a reputation beyond reputeGreyingJay has a reputation beyond reputeGreyingJay has a reputation beyond reputeGreyingJay has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Becoming A Mentor

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dwight_2 View Post
You do not want to become a mentor for your own team because the friendships and particular relationships between you and other team members will become extremely stressed if you are trying to transition from friend to adult leader... it just doesn't go well.
The other thing that can (will) happen is that you'll feel an obligation to the team (obviously you want your friends to succeed), and will be pressured to spend more and more of your time during build season and competition season. You'll become a stressed out, sleep deprived wreck wondering how on earth you're going to pass those midterms and keep your marks high enough to maintain your scholarship -- and your team will still be wondering why you can't put even more hours into them "like you used to".

At least with mentoring another team you can set expectations going in and it'll be easier to say no to things in order to maintain your studies.
__________________

"If I'm going to mentor someone, I'm going to be involved in their life as a positive force." -Mechvet
Reply With Quote
  #11   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-27-2018, 12:00 PM
vhcook's Avatar
vhcook vhcook is online now
Reader of Things
AKA: Victoria
FRC #1939 (Kuhnigits)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Rookie Year: 2006
Location: Kansas City, MO
Posts: 606
vhcook has a reputation beyond reputevhcook has a reputation beyond reputevhcook has a reputation beyond reputevhcook has a reputation beyond reputevhcook has a reputation beyond reputevhcook has a reputation beyond reputevhcook has a reputation beyond reputevhcook has a reputation beyond reputevhcook has a reputation beyond reputevhcook has a reputation beyond reputevhcook has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Becoming A Mentor

It's generally considered a good idea to focus on school for at least your first year of college. It's a big transition, and college grades matter a lot when you're looking for work. For extended rumination on that subject, please see this sticky thread from the general forum.

My best recommendation to you is find an event near your college or your hometown to volunteer at over your spring break (or equivalent), be helpful on CD when the traditional panicked programmer threads form during build season, and otherwise take next season off. The bonus from volunteering near your college is that you can meet local-ish teams and see both who needs more mentoring help and what their team culture is like.

Finding a new team to mentor isn't just about what they need, it's also about whether you are comfortable with the team culture -- how often do they meet and where, who makes decisions and how, what is the expectation for how mentors and students interact...
__________________




Reply With Quote
  #12   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-27-2018, 12:01 PM
BrendanB BrendanB is offline
Registered User
AKA: Brendan Browne
FRC #3467 (Windham Windup)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Rookie Year: 2003
Location: Londonderry, NH
Posts: 3,253
BrendanB has a reputation beyond reputeBrendanB has a reputation beyond reputeBrendanB has a reputation beyond reputeBrendanB has a reputation beyond reputeBrendanB has a reputation beyond reputeBrendanB has a reputation beyond reputeBrendanB has a reputation beyond reputeBrendanB has a reputation beyond reputeBrendanB has a reputation beyond reputeBrendanB has a reputation beyond reputeBrendanB has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Becoming A Mentor

Taking time off to volunteer or pursue something else are good recommendations for any recent HS graduate. Would +1 the above posters who suggested that.

If that is an avenue you do not pursue I would recommend the following.

-Don't mentor your current team, look around. You already seem to have reached that conclusion on your own for various reasons, but for other students in your position reading this post its not wise to try to mentor your peers the following year. Many teams have four year policies before alums can come back and mentor. Reach out to a senior mentor in the area or talk to mentors on other teams in the area.

- Find a team that will mentor you as a young adult! This is a really important one that doesn't get shared often. Many new mentors look around for teams where they see a need for their skills and experience, but overlook that for the most part they are about to try something new themselves. Find a team with more experienced mentors who can help build you up, give you a chance to grow, and model what mentoring looks like.
__________________
1519 Mechanical M.A.Y.H.E.M. Student 2008 - 2010
3467 Windham Windup Mentor 2011 - 2015
1058 PVC Pirates Mentor 2016 - 2018

Member of the New England FRC community? Join the FRC New England Alliance Facebook Group
Reply With Quote
  #13   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-27-2018, 12:06 PM
jtrv's Avatar
jtrv jtrv is offline
Registered User
AKA: Justin
FRC #5254 (HYPE)
Team Role: Team Spirit / Cheering
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Rookie Year: 2012
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 649
jtrv has a reputation beyond reputejtrv has a reputation beyond reputejtrv has a reputation beyond reputejtrv has a reputation beyond reputejtrv has a reputation beyond reputejtrv has a reputation beyond reputejtrv has a reputation beyond reputejtrv has a reputation beyond reputejtrv has a reputation beyond reputejtrv has a reputation beyond reputejtrv has a reputation beyond repute
Wink Re: Becoming A Mentor

Hey, so, I'll chime in here. My senior year was 2015. I enrolled at a college 3.5 hours away from my HS team. I spent the first two weeks of build season with them and then went to help them out at events (kind of). It was a good break to not be spending so many hours per week for so many weeks on end and I still got to have my "FRC fix" by going to the events (which were very conveniently located for me -- my college town and my hometown).

The next year (2017) I did the same thing. It was ok and I still got to have the great competition experience with the team. But being 3.5 hours away from your robot during build season sucks.

This year I'm mentoring a more local team and it's great. I get to spend hours and hours and hours at meetings. I'm a much better mentor than I would have been two years ago when I graduated HS. I've grown up a bit and I've learned a lot more about robots.

I recommend exploring the option of either volunteering or becoming a "remote advisor" / "overattached alum" / "college mascot" for your HS team if you're on good terms with them. Let them do their thing but help out here and there. (Don't let yourself think that you have any part of their robot. That's when it gets annoying for others.) You still get the competition fix. If not, you could volunteer, like others said.

For me, it wasn't about adjusting to college. I was adjusted within my first 3 days of arriving. It's about learning enough - not just about robots, but about life in general - to become a solid, effective role model for your students.
__________________
2791 - 2012-17 | 340 - 2018 | 5254 - 2018-*
My opinions do not reflect those of my team(s).

Last edited by jtrv : 03-27-2018 at 12:10 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #14   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-27-2018, 12:16 PM
MBimrose16's Avatar
MBimrose16 MBimrose16 is offline
Registered User
AKA: Miles Bimrose
FRC #3865 (Riley WildBots)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Rookie Year: 2013
Location: South Bend, Indiana
Posts: 21
MBimrose16 will become famous soon enough
Re: Becoming A Mentor

Since the question was how to find a team that needed help, I will share my experience finding a team to mentor my freshman year of college. Location was a big factor for me because I did not have a car to get to meetings. I used FIRSTmap https://firstmap.github.io/ by 1418 to find teams in the South Bend area that would be close enough that I could bum a ride from other mentors. I was left with 135, 5484, and 3865. I looked at the team's performance for the past few years on Blue Alliance and narrowed my choice to 3865 because I wanted the chance to help a program grow. As a potential programming mentor, I would look at autonomous routines for nearby teams. Maybe they haven't had an auto or just drove straight. If you want a challenge, look for a team that has never used vision or PID control.

This thread is going to be full of responses telling you not to mentor your first year. As someone that has done it and is continuing, I want to leave you with my 2 cents. Last year I was in Gen-Eds and able to spend a lot of time mentoring, I hardly missed a meeting and stopped playing video games and other time sucks to stay caught up on my work. This year I'm getting into the Mechanical Engineering curriculum which is much more time intensive and have cut back my involvement to a couple days a week and weekends. My general rule of thumb is if I have to stay up past midnight to get my work done then I don't go to the meeting that day. To be as involved as I have been I had to trade off involvement in clubs and sports. I am content with this because I have gotten much more out of mentoring than troubleshooting the Notre Dame Robot Football fleet or welding the frame of the Baja race car. You need to be realistic with your time and be ready for the difficult transition from student to teacher. I am still struggling with this, but as I gain more technical and teaching skills, I hope that with a couple years practice I can be a half decent mentor.
__________________
University of Notre Dame
FRC 991: 2013-2016
FRC 3865: 2016-Present
Reply With Quote
  #15   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 03-27-2018, 12:50 PM
KingOfDemise's Avatar
KingOfDemise KingOfDemise is offline
Addicted to Robots
AKA: Always Building
FRC #3883 (Data Bits)
Team Role: Driver
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Rookie Year: 2015
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 127
KingOfDemise is just really niceKingOfDemise is just really niceKingOfDemise is just really niceKingOfDemise is just really niceKingOfDemise is just really nice
Re: Becoming A Mentor

I have seen college "mentors" on teams do extremely well with the work load, but it isn't for everyone. If you still want to be involved with a team instead of volunteering, just help them out. Don't try and be a full time mentor during the build season. You can help at the beginning of the season by building practice elements, or helping students analyze the game. You could come in once a week and show students how to use machines, or write code. Don't expect, or try, to be a full mentor. It will only add unneeded stress. There is nothing stopping you from helping a team your first year in college, and as I said, I have seen it work for quite a few people.
__________________


FTC 7232 DynaBytes 2016-17 Drive Coach and Fabrication
FRC 3883 Data Bits 2015-18 Student, 2016 HP, 2017 Dean's List Semi-finalist, 2017-18 Driver, 2017-18 Build Captain
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:03 PM.

The Chief Delphi Forums are sponsored by Innovation First International, Inc.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © Chief Delphi