OCCRA
Go to Post Each match is a learning experiance - the only thing you can do is get better. - SuperJake [more]
Home
Go Back   Chief Delphi > Technical > Electrical
CD-Media   CD-Spy  
portal register members calendar search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read FAQ rules

 
Reply
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
  #1   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 11-20-2017, 10:57 PM
Ryan-Greenblatt Ryan-Greenblatt is offline
A foolish programmer
FRC #0900 (Zebracorns)
Team Role: Programmer
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Rookie Year: 2015
Location: NC
Posts: 37
Ryan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant future
Breaker Modeling

With the popularity of 775 pros and generally high current robots modeling the 120 Amp breaker* seems like a good idea. By using the 120 amp breaker data sheet, I made a function (if you want exact specifications just ask) to map any current greater than 120 amps to the lower bound of how long it will take the breaker to pop**. Then, to figure out how close a breaker is to popping, I can just sum dt/function(current) where function is as described in the sentence before***. So, if the breaker would take 12 seconds to pop at 240 amps and 4 seconds to pop at 360 amps, then if it was at 240 amps for 2 seconds and 360 amps for 1 second it would be 43% "popped" (2/12+1/4). However, this model doesn't account at all for the situation where current is below the rated maximum. Does anyone have any data or ideas on what occurs in contexts such as when the breaker is at 360 amps for 3 seconds then at 40 amps for 2 seconds then at 360 amps for another 2 seconds? Any data or better ideas on how to generally model breakers would also be great.


*The model also should work for any of the PDP legal breakers as they also work (from my understanding) by having a piece of metal deform due to heating up from high current. Their data sheets are also easily available.
**This assumes an additive property which hopefully isn't too unrealistic.
***That function can also pretty easily take into account temperature derating , that calculation assumes around 25-35 degrees C
Reply With Quote
  #2   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 11-21-2017, 01:52 AM
AriMB's Avatar
AriMB AriMB is offline
The Philadelphian emigrant
AKA: Ari Meles-Braverman
FRC #5987 (Galaxia)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Rookie Year: 2012
Location: Haifa, Israel
Posts: 1,300
AriMB has a reputation beyond reputeAriMB has a reputation beyond reputeAriMB has a reputation beyond reputeAriMB has a reputation beyond reputeAriMB has a reputation beyond reputeAriMB has a reputation beyond reputeAriMB has a reputation beyond reputeAriMB has a reputation beyond reputeAriMB has a reputation beyond reputeAriMB has a reputation beyond reputeAriMB has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Breaker Modeling

I'd be interested to hear how this works out, specifically how accurate to real life it is. I think someone from 1678 posted on here a while ago that the graph on the spec sheet isn't very accurate and they saw a lot of variation in their testing they had a hard time accounting for in the graph. You might want to reach out to them and see if they want to share the results of whatever testing they did.
__________________
Studying MechE at the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology
2017-present: Technical Mentor FRC 5987
2017-present: CSA for FIRST Israel
2012-2016: Member FRC 423 Captian, Programmer (LabVIEW), Electrical, CAD, Manipulator, Chassis, Business, Outreach (everything)
Reply With Quote
  #3   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 11-21-2017, 02:05 AM
phurley67's Avatar
phurley67 phurley67 is offline
Programming Mentor
AKA: Patrick Hurley
FRC #0862 (Lightning Robotics)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Rookie Year: 2013
Location: Michigan
Posts: 134
phurley67 will become famous soon enough
Re: Breaker Modeling

Any breaker analysis ignoring its temperature is probably going to fail. Notice on the data sheet there is another graph describing the temp derating curve.

Over the course of a match the breaker is constantly heating up. So if the breaker is cold a the beginning of a match you might get reliably get over 6 seconds at 360amps, and by the end of the match less than 4 seconds.

You need to model the temp changes over time. Stick an accurate temperature sensor on the breaker and gather data on how it warms over time at various loads.
__________________
Lightning Robotics -- Give me an Aaaaa

Reply With Quote
  #4   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 11-21-2017, 07:09 AM
GeeTwo's Avatar
GeeTwo GeeTwo is offline
Technical Director
AKA: Gus Michel II
FRC #3946 (Tiger Robotics)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Rookie Year: 2013
Location: Slidell, LA
Posts: 4,903
GeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Breaker Modeling

Quote:
Originally Posted by phurley67 View Post
Any breaker analysis ignoring its temperature is probably going to fail. ... Stick an accurate temperature sensor on the breaker and gather data on how it warms over time at various loads.
You should probably also monitor the temperature as it cools (with no current, but nothing actively cooling it) as well. Maybe not so critical for use within a match, but it would be essential for predicting longer terms.
__________________

If you can't find time to do it right, how are you going to find time to do it over?
If you don't pass it on, it never happened.
Robots are great, but inspiration is the reason we're here.
Friends don't let friends use master links.
Reply With Quote
  #5   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 11-21-2017, 08:12 AM
philso philso is offline
Mentor
FRC #2882 (Nuts n Boltz)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Rookie Year: 2011
Location: Houston, Tx
Posts: 1,236
philso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Breaker Modeling

Quote:
Originally Posted by phurley67 View Post
Any breaker analysis ignoring its temperature is probably going to fail. Notice on the data sheet there is another graph describing the temp derating curve.

Over the course of a match the breaker is constantly heating up. So if the breaker is cold a the beginning of a match you might get reliably get over 6 seconds at 360amps, and by the end of the match less than 4 seconds.

You need to model the temp changes over time. Stick an accurate temperature sensor on the breaker and gather data on how it warms over time at various loads.
Factors such as the airflow around the breaker and the thermal mass of what the breaker are mounted to will have an effect on how it behaves. One also has the problem of how to define a current vs. time profile that makes sense since each robot will be different.

The large industrial breakers I used at previous jobs behaved the same way and were influenced by the same factors. We did some basic calculations and always did extensive testing to verify correct operation.
Reply With Quote
  #6   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 11-21-2017, 09:13 AM
Ryan-Greenblatt Ryan-Greenblatt is offline
A foolish programmer
FRC #0900 (Zebracorns)
Team Role: Programmer
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Rookie Year: 2015
Location: NC
Posts: 37
Ryan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant future
Re: Breaker Modeling

Quote:
Originally Posted by phurley67 View Post
Any breaker analysis ignoring its temperature is probably going to fail. Notice on the data sheet there is another graph describing the temp derating curve.
...

You need to model the temp changes over time. Stick an accurate temperature sensor on the breaker and gather data on how it warms over time at various loads.
I have taken a look at the derating curve; it is quite simple to account for ambient temperature using that data. I didn't think about accounting for changes in the temperature of the breaker housing, thanks for informing about this issue. Adding that to the model is somewhat complicated by the fact that there is a relationship between current and temperature; I don't know if when the supplied data on pop time vs % of rated current was taken, housing temperature was rising significantly over time. If 160 amps are run through the breaker, it theoretically takes about 40 seconds for the breaker to pop. In that time how much does the breaker housing heat up? If we assume that the data on current vs pop time involves no rise in housing temperature, then the curve may simply be shifted in real time using a sensor. This is probably unreasonable, but it will only make the model more conservative.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeeTwo View Post
You should probably also monitor the temperature as it cools (with no current, but nothing actively cooling it) as well. Maybe not so critical for use within a match, but it would be essential for predicting longer terms.
Sound like a good idea for testing. Also, all match data will be logged and eventually published along with the results of any testing we do, potentially including breaker temp data.

Quote:
Originally Posted by philso View Post
The large industrial breakers I used at previous jobs behaved the same way and were influenced by the same factors. We did some basic calculations and always did extensive testing to verify correct operation.
I am curious what those basic calculations were and what testing was done. Also, did you end up modeling the breakers in real time?
Reply With Quote
  #7   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 11-21-2017, 10:05 AM
Unsung FIRST Hero
Al Skierkiewicz Al Skierkiewicz is offline
Broadcast Eng/Chief Robot Inspector
AKA: Big Al WFFA 2005
FRC #0111 (WildStang)
Team Role: Engineer
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Rookie Year: 1996
Location: Wheeling, IL
Posts: 10,982
Al Skierkiewicz has a reputation beyond reputeAl Skierkiewicz has a reputation beyond reputeAl Skierkiewicz has a reputation beyond reputeAl Skierkiewicz has a reputation beyond reputeAl Skierkiewicz has a reputation beyond reputeAl Skierkiewicz has a reputation beyond reputeAl Skierkiewicz has a reputation beyond reputeAl Skierkiewicz has a reputation beyond reputeAl Skierkiewicz has a reputation beyond reputeAl Skierkiewicz has a reputation beyond reputeAl Skierkiewicz has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Breaker Modeling

To be sure it is not the ambient temperature that is important, it is the temp of the bimetal strip inside the breaker that matters. In my opinion, the wire does a great job at removing heat, drawing it away from the interior of the breaker. One side of the metal is welded to the contact on the outside of the breaker. The interior space will be near ambient at the start of the match.
The variation in the specification curve is more a production variance than anything else.
Please remember that FRC multiple motor drives may not have a 100% duty cycle at max current. If the robot is actually moving, CIM motor current should be considerably less than stall current. While worse case stall current on a CIM motor is 131 amps, wiring and speed controllers enter significant loss on FRC robots. On average, I would place stall currents in the 100-110 amp range for FRC robots. Many teams use a "turbo" mode in their software that runs the robot at somewhat less than full throttle for the majority of the match and then only use "full throttle" when needed for speed. While less than full throttle, max current will not occur in all motors at the same point in time. The PWM output of the motor controllers is not in sync and the motor commutators are neither running at the same speed or commutator position.
__________________
Good Luck All. Learn something new, everyday!
Al
WB9UVJ
www.wildstang.org
________________________
Generating steam since 1996.
Reply With Quote
  #8   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 11-21-2017, 10:24 AM
Ryan-Greenblatt Ryan-Greenblatt is offline
A foolish programmer
FRC #0900 (Zebracorns)
Team Role: Programmer
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Rookie Year: 2015
Location: NC
Posts: 37
Ryan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant futureRyan-Greenblatt has a brilliant future
Re: Breaker Modeling

Quote:
Originally Posted by Al Skierkiewicz View Post
Please remember that FRC multiple motor drives may not have a 100% duty cycle at max current. If the robot is actually moving, CIM motor current should be considerably less than stall current.
Yep, I was planning on using the PDP's measured current as the input to the model for the 120 amp breaker. So it will account for all current flow, including from items other than motors.
Reply With Quote
  #9   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 11-21-2017, 10:48 AM
Ryan_Todd's Avatar
Ryan_Todd Ryan_Todd is offline
ye of little faith
FRC #0862 (Lightning Robotics)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Rookie Year: 2005
Location: Plymouth, MI
Posts: 122
Ryan_Todd has a reputation beyond reputeRyan_Todd has a reputation beyond reputeRyan_Todd has a reputation beyond reputeRyan_Todd has a reputation beyond reputeRyan_Todd has a reputation beyond reputeRyan_Todd has a reputation beyond reputeRyan_Todd has a reputation beyond reputeRyan_Todd has a reputation beyond reputeRyan_Todd has a reputation beyond reputeRyan_Todd has a reputation beyond reputeRyan_Todd has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Breaker Modeling

If you have any inclination to integrate a proper thermal analysis into your model, I've already done most of the legwork.


Original post here, discussing the effect of pre-cooling a main breaker with canned compressed air before the start of a match:
https://www.chiefdelphi.com/forums/s...4&postcount=44
(WARNING, this original post made an incorrect assumption of the main breaker's series resistance, and so the final numbers are off by a factor of 6.)


I unfortunately can't edit the original post anymore, so I updated the calculations and published the result as a white paper:
https://www.chiefdelphi.com/media/papers/3404
__________________

Last edited by Ryan_Todd : 11-21-2017 at 01:14 PM. Reason: word choice
Reply With Quote
  #10   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 11-21-2017, 11:28 AM
InFlight's Avatar
InFlight InFlight is offline
3574 - The King's of Bling
AKA: Jim
FRC #3574 (High Tekerz)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Rookie Year: 2012
Location: Seattle Area
Posts: 237
InFlight has a reputation beyond reputeInFlight has a reputation beyond reputeInFlight has a reputation beyond reputeInFlight has a reputation beyond reputeInFlight has a reputation beyond reputeInFlight has a reputation beyond reputeInFlight has a reputation beyond reputeInFlight has a reputation beyond reputeInFlight has a reputation beyond reputeInFlight has a reputation beyond reputeInFlight has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Breaker Modeling

The nominal main circuit breaker trip current is an i^(constant) x t relationship.

This FRC 120 amp breakers trip appears to be around i^(.4) x time based on the spec sheet.

The circuit breaker is in a molded (insulated) case which will reduce the effective heat transfer rate.

At room temperature (77 F) the trip current is about 113% of rated. The resistive heating will be related to a function of integrated V*I with time. At some point the heat transfer rates will tend to stabilize the internal temperature. I’d suspect this would be warm enough to bring the internal temp to close to 100 F or more, and reduce the trip current to the rated 120 Amps or a bit less.

You could measure the breaker metal terminal temperatures to get a better idea of internal temperature vs time.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #11   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 11-21-2017, 11:36 AM
GeeTwo's Avatar
GeeTwo GeeTwo is offline
Technical Director
AKA: Gus Michel II
FRC #3946 (Tiger Robotics)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Rookie Year: 2013
Location: Slidell, LA
Posts: 4,903
GeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond reputeGeeTwo has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Breaker Modeling

Quote:
Originally Posted by InFlight View Post
...The circuit breaker is in a molded (insulated) case which will reduce the effective heat transfer rate.
As Al noted, the main route to sink the breaker heat is the wires, not the case.

Quote:
Originally Posted by InFlight View Post
...
You could measure the breaker metal terminal temperatures to get a better idea of internal temperature vs time.
Definitely better than the case.
__________________

If you can't find time to do it right, how are you going to find time to do it over?
If you don't pass it on, it never happened.
Robots are great, but inspiration is the reason we're here.
Friends don't let friends use master links.
Reply With Quote
  #12   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 11-21-2017, 11:50 AM
Mike Schreiber's Avatar
Mike Schreiber Mike Schreiber is offline
Registered User
FRC #0067 (The HOT Team)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Rookie Year: 2006
Location: Milford, Michigan
Posts: 539
Mike Schreiber has a reputation beyond reputeMike Schreiber has a reputation beyond reputeMike Schreiber has a reputation beyond reputeMike Schreiber has a reputation beyond reputeMike Schreiber has a reputation beyond reputeMike Schreiber has a reputation beyond reputeMike Schreiber has a reputation beyond reputeMike Schreiber has a reputation beyond reputeMike Schreiber has a reputation beyond reputeMike Schreiber has a reputation beyond reputeMike Schreiber has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Breaker Modeling

Let's put some physics to this.

Breakers trip because of heat. So we should do an energy balance and consider this an open system with no work being done. Heat energy enters the system because the breaker / wire assembly has a small resistance. Heat energy leaves the system via conduction or convection.

Q_breaker = Q_resistance - Q_cooling

All power dissipated in a resistor is converted to heat energy. This is expressed as P = I^2 * R. This gives you a result in Watts. Current can be measured with acceptable accuracy through the PDP.

Modelling the heat loss via conduction or convection gets a bit more complicated but can be assumed to be linear over time based on the governing equations.

To test the validity of this method let's generate a curve that hopefully matches reasonably well with the data sheet using these equations.

Using arbitrary numbers let's say we believe the breaker trips after applying 150 amps for 500 seconds (based roughly on the data sheet, in reality you'll want to determine this experimentally). We'll assign a resistance value of 0.001 Ohms (it's arbitrary and doesn't really impact the calculations). We'll also arbitrarily say that the breaker has 2 W of cooling via conduction.

Q_resistance = [(150 amps)^2 * 0.001 Ohms * 500 seconds] = 11250 Joules
Q_cooling = - (2 J/s * 500 seconds) = 1000 Joules

So we can say that the breaker will trip when it reaches 10250 Joules of heat (this corresponds to a temperature via a specific heat value) Note that I didn't look up specific heat values or resistances for anything for the sake of quick math so my Joules are probably way off from realistic numbers.

Now to solve for time to breaker trip at a different current we can do some algebra.

Q_breakerpop = I^2*R*t - P_cooling*t

t = Q_breakerpop / (I^2*R - P_cooling)

This reasonably creates a similar arc as the data sheet generates, but likely needs a lot of tuning via experimental values.

Since I is obviously not constant in a match a model could be generated tracking heat generated using the PDP data.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	breaker.JPG
Views:	31
Size:	21.4 KB
ID:	22678  
__________________
Mike Schreiber

Kettering University ('09-'13) University of Michigan ('14-'18?)
FLL ('01-'02), FRC Team 27 ('06-'09), Team 397 ('10), Team 3450/314 ('11), Team 67 ('14-'??)
Reply With Quote
  #13   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 11-21-2017, 03:10 PM
philso philso is offline
Mentor
FRC #2882 (Nuts n Boltz)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Rookie Year: 2011
Location: Houston, Tx
Posts: 1,236
philso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Breaker Modeling

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryan-Greenblatt View Post
I am curious what those basic calculations were and what testing was done. Also, did you end up modeling the breakers in real time?
We did the calculations that people have already discussed. We also added a 25% factor to account for surge currents in our application.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Schreiber View Post
Let's put some physics to this.

Breakers trip because of heat. So we should do an energy balance and consider this an open system with no work being done. Heat energy enters the system because the breaker / wire assembly has a small resistance. Heat energy leaves the system via conduction or convection.

Q_breaker = Q_resistance - Q_cooling

All power dissipated in a resistor is converted to heat energy. This is expressed as P = I^2 * R. This gives you a result in Watts. Current can be measured with acceptable accuracy through the PDP.

Modelling the heat loss via conduction or convection gets a bit more complicated but can be assumed to be linear over time based on the governing equations.

To test the validity of this method let's generate a curve that hopefully matches reasonably well with the data sheet using these equations.

Using arbitrary numbers let's say we believe the breaker trips after applying 150 amps for 500 seconds (based roughly on the data sheet, in reality you'll want to determine this experimentally). We'll assign a resistance value of 0.001 Ohms (it's arbitrary and doesn't really impact the calculations). We'll also arbitrarily say that the breaker has 2 W of cooling via conduction.

Q_resistance = [(150 amps)^2 * 0.001 Ohms * 500 seconds] = 11250 Joules
Q_cooling = - (2 J/s * 500 seconds) = 1000 Joules

So we can say that the breaker will trip when it reaches 10250 Joules of heat (this corresponds to a temperature via a specific heat value) Note that I didn't look up specific heat values or resistances for anything for the sake of quick math so my Joules are probably way off from realistic numbers.

Now to solve for time to breaker trip at a different current we can do some algebra.

Q_breakerpop = I^2*R*t - P_cooling*t

t = Q_breakerpop / (I^2*R - P_cooling)

This reasonably creates a similar arc as the data sheet generates, but likely needs a lot of tuning via experimental values.

Since I is obviously not constant in a match a model could be generated tracking heat generated using the PDP data.
Because the breaker is a thermal device, and the trip current is dependent on the actual absolute temperature of the trip element, the ambient temperature around the breaker DOES affect the actual trip current. The thermal mass of the other parts of the breaker and the thermal conductivity to the ambient also has a significant effect. Because the thermal mass of the breaker components has an effect, the "history" of the current profile over time will have an effect. Calculations that don't take these factors into account will most likely give misleading results.

Thus, one would have to characterize the breaker behaviour for each particular robot to get an accurate estimate of the trip point. This characterization work makes sense if one is building a bunch of very similar robots. Typically, each team will have a different environment for their breakers so it will be difficult to use the results for one team on a different robot.

It seems that the OP may be trying to use the breakers as a current limiting device. Breakers are meant only to serve as protection devices and are never designed to have a precise trip level. If your objective is to prevent the breakers from tripping in high current applications, the proper way would be to set the current limit of all of the motor controllers in each application (drivetrain, winch, shooter) to the same level, ensuring that level is below the minimum trip current of the breakers, taking into account any de-rating factors. The current limit level of the motor controllers should be more consistent, from one unit to another. It should also be largely insensitive to the ambient temperature and the history.

Last edited by philso : 11-21-2017 at 03:19 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #14   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 11-21-2017, 05:25 PM
phurley67's Avatar
phurley67 phurley67 is offline
Programming Mentor
AKA: Patrick Hurley
FRC #0862 (Lightning Robotics)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Rookie Year: 2013
Location: Michigan
Posts: 134
phurley67 will become famous soon enough
Re: Breaker Modeling

Quote:
Originally Posted by philso View Post
If your objective is to prevent the breakers from tripping in high current applications, the proper way would be to set the current limit of all of the motor controllers in each application (drivetrain, winch, shooter) to the same level, ensuring that level is below the minimum trip current of the breakers, taking into account any de-rating factors.
But that means we would be slower/less powerful/etc than someone else who pushes the envelope. Our auto shifting 6 cim drive train would easily exceeded the current limit for short periods of time. We also had code that monitored how long we were above a calibrated max current level and would force a downshift, and a second monitor that would kill the drive motors if we exceeded it (that never happened in play), with the assumption it is better to lose a battle, than to trip a main breaker and be out for a match. Those calibrated values were educated guesses made based on these charts, some math, and real world experience.

All of that said, under the RoboRIO, we were far more likely to experience brown outs, and adjusting everything to avoid/minimize brownouts will make it very unlikely to ever trip the main breaker. We ran test runs, adjusted motor ramping, current limits, etc until under abusive driving conditions with a fresh battery, brownouts were very rare and when they did occur they were of the very short variety. This combined with a fairly smart auto-downshift, and a traction limited low gear; we did not have any issues with the main breaker all season.
__________________
Lightning Robotics -- Give me an Aaaaa

Reply With Quote
  #15   Spotlight this post!  
Unread 11-21-2017, 06:48 PM
philso philso is offline
Mentor
FRC #2882 (Nuts n Boltz)
Team Role: Mentor
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Rookie Year: 2011
Location: Houston, Tx
Posts: 1,236
philso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond reputephilso has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Breaker Modeling

Quote:
Originally Posted by phurley67 View Post
But that means we would be slower/less powerful/etc than someone else who pushes the envelope. Our auto shifting 6 cim drive train would easily exceeded the current limit for short periods of time. We also had code that monitored how long we were above a calibrated max current level and would force a downshift, and a second monitor that would kill the drive motors if we exceeded it (that never happened in play), with the assumption it is better to lose a battle, than to trip a main breaker and be out for a match. Those calibrated values were educated guesses made based on these charts, some math, and real world experience.

All of that said, under the RoboRIO, we were far more likely to experience brown outs, and adjusting everything to avoid/minimize brownouts will make it very unlikely to ever trip the main breaker. We ran test runs, adjusted motor ramping, current limits, etc until under abusive driving conditions with a fresh battery, brownouts were very rare and when they did occur they were of the very short variety. This combined with a fairly smart auto-downshift, and a traction limited low gear; we did not have any issues with the main breaker all season.
With ALL things equal (including your driver's driving style/strategy), allowing higher motor currents might give you an advantage. Of course, all things are not really equal so it is possible to have a robot with lower motor currents outperform one with higher motor currents.

It will be better for teams to implement current limit through the motor controller than to have the breakers open, even the snap action ones in the PDP. Pushing the envelope, as you are suggesting, might give you 5-10% more peak current, for periods of 1 second or less, but you will have a greater risk of opening a breaker. It also makes you vulnerable to variations in factors such as the ambient temperature and part-to-part variations (breakers are not tightly calibrated). Will that slightly higher peak motor current really make a measurable difference in your performance? Is the risk of opening a breaker acceptable to your strategy? Can you devise a way to get better overall performance by not pushing the motor power envelope so hard so you can have reliable power? Why are you allowing abusive driving conditions? The sustained high current draw conditions will wear out your batteries faster.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:20 AM.

The Chief Delphi Forums are sponsored by Innovation First International, Inc.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © Chief Delphi