Addition

Posted by Nick .

Student on team #240, Mach V, from Jefferson Monroe High School and Visteon.

Posted on 10/14/2000 9:38 AM MST

I like to think I’m good in math but I must be missing something. 8.5’ x 3 is 25.5, correct? Well think I.D. of the rack is 21’, correct? Also can the rack leave the surface of the playing field? Or the whole field altogether?

Posted by Joe Johnson.   [PICTURE: SAME | NEW | HELP]

Engineer on team #47, Chief Delphi, from Pontiac Central High School and Delphi Automotive Systems.

Posted on 10/14/2000 10:30 AM MST

In Reply to: Addition posted by Nick on 10/14/2000 9:38 AM MST:

The inside dimesion of the square rack (the distance between the two parallel tubes) is 26 inches.

The lengths of the straight edges are shorter because the elboes have a radius to them and therefor shorten the effective length of the straight tubes.

Joe J.

P.S. No rule against lifting the rack or pushing it out of bounds. Thinking about what to do if it IS pushed out… more later. JJ

Posted by Raul.   [PICTURE: SAME | NEW | HELP]

Engineer on team #111, Wildstang, from Rolling Meadows & Wheeling HS and Motorola.

Posted on 10/14/2000 12:23 PM MST

In Reply to: Inside Dim of Square posted by Joe Johnson on 10/14/2000 10:30 AM MST:

How about scoring of the rack if it is partially out of bounds but still on your side of the field?

Raul

Posted by Joe Johnson.   [PICTURE: SAME | NEW | HELP]

Engineer on team #47, Chief Delphi, from Pontiac Central High School and Delphi Automotive Systems.

Posted on 10/14/2000 3:11 PM MST

In Reply to: Re: Inside Dim of Square posted by Raul on 10/14/2000 12:23 PM MST:

How about this proposal?

  1. If the rack is touching the ground out of bounds, it does not count as a doubler.

  2. If the rack goes out of bounds, it will not be returned to the field by the officials.

  3. A robot may attempt to bring the square rack back in bounds but if the robot touches the ground out of bounds while it is attempting to bring the rack back in bounds, it will be declared out of bounds itself – very perilous work, reclaiming out of bounds square racks.

Official rulings will follow, but I would like comments on this proposal if any exists.

Joe J.

Posted by Jason Rukes.

Engineer on team #109, Arial Systems & Libertyville HS, from Libertyville High School and Arial Systems Corp & SEC Design.

Posted on 10/16/2000 6:19 AM MST

In Reply to: Square Ball Rack & Out of Bounds posted by Joe Johnson on 10/14/2000 3:11 PM MST:

  1. Is it legal for a robot to lift the square rack completely off of the playing surface and hold it there?

  2. Is it legal for a robot to forcefully latch onto the square rack like a pair of vise-grips, as long as no noticeable damage is done to the square rack?

Posted by Joe Johnson.   [PICTURE: SAME | NEW | HELP]

Engineer on team #47, Chief Delphi, from Pontiac Central High School and Delphi Automotive Systems.

Posted on 10/16/2000 8:04 AM MST

In Reply to: Re: Square Ball Rack & Out of Bounds posted by Jason Rukes on 10/16/2000 6:19 AM MST:

: 1. Is it legal for a robot to lift the square rack completely off of the playing surface and hold it there?

Yes, this is perfectly legal

: 2. Is it legal for a robot to forcefully latch onto the square rack like a pair of vise-grips, as long as no noticeable damage is done to the square rack?

Yes, but try to be reasonable with regard to clamping force. We will only have a limited supply of the square racks. If teams routinely start to crush them or otherwise damage them, we will have to start limiting this type of activity. So… Clamping on is OK, but don’t break the thing.