Advanced Autonomous “Code”

These are serious questions so serious answers only:

Is it legal to put living organisms on your robot? If not which rules does this violate?

There’s already tons of bacteria on your robot… so how much of a stretch is it to put something such as a fish or insect on your robot?

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Been reading about Project Orcon, huh?

(The answer is probably that it would be disallowed by the inspector on R9 grounds, rather than a specific prohibition.)

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Edit: While this might not be FRC legal, I still think it’s a great project for an FRC team to tackle.

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Quick read of the rules, while I couldn’t find anything outright prohibiting living organisms on the robot, at a stretch they may fall under these:

  • R34 - allowed motors and actuators
  • R46 - perhaps the chemical energy stored in the organism would fall under this, however you could claim bumper wood also has potential chemical energy stored.

R46. Non-electrical sources of energy used by the ROBOT, (i.e., stored at the start of a MATCH), shall
come only from the following sources:
A. compressed air stored in the pneumatic system that has been charged in compliance with
R86 and R87,
B. a change in the altitude of the ROBOT center of gravity,
C. storage achieved by deformation of ROBOT parts,
D. closed-loop COTS pneumatic (gas) shocks, and
E. air-filled (pneumatic) wheels.

  • R64 - relating to the organisms having autonomy over its own movement

R64. ROBOTS must be controlled via one (1) programmable National Instruments roboRIO (P/N:
am3000), with image version FRC_roboRIO_2019_v14 or later.

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There’s precedence for animals not being allowed as an energy source.

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Ah, but we all know that it may be legal under the new rules. So the correct answer here is “wait for the new Robot rules to come out”. Either way, I’m certain you’ll have to account for it on your CAW / BOM. And if you’re utilizing some type of avian, the CAW seems oddly appropriate.

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You might be able to have your goldfish on a robot for a competition or two, but it will probably result in FIRST creating a new rule.
It depends upon your desire: to be the first to place a fish (or other large organism) on a robot - OR - being able to say “Yep, we’re the reason Rule R66.25 exists.”
Just hope that it is a low impact game - imagine the fallout of your animal dying from stress, “Unsympathetic High School robotics team cruelly kills hamster in robot competition - they did it for laughs.”

Edited addition: Perhaps an insect would be less problematic.

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Not to be contradictory to my post (advocating that an organism not be on board a competition robot), but is a passenger a source of energy?

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Combine with IP over Avian, and we’ve got ourselves a whole new pigeon-based robotics competition!

There’s a recurring joke where we coat a lightweight freshman in tin foil, making them say “beep”, and letting them run around the field accepting shouted commands from the drive team…

Ok. Per others. Possibly legal as an exotic coprocessor. Probably gonna get a rule or team update made within 0.0000000000000000000000000001 seconds of inspection.

If you do it, please have them record the call with HQ where they explain and clarify the situation. History deserves to hear this exchange.

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These calls should all be recorded for Historical purposes. I’ve always wanted to hear the calls with HQ from right before and after this happened (I’ve heard and told the story plenty of times, but I can only imagine what the call was like): https://www.youtube.com/watch?&v=LLjc3vKQcXQ

Is communication through shouting legal? I though the radio was the only allowed form of communication between the fresh-ermmmm, robot and the operator.

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So give them a backpack with a rio, radio, pdp, battery, etc and transmit audio over network tables.

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A nudibranch might be a good tool here. I worked with someone that found the nerve cells in a large nudibranch that controlled left and right movement. There was some surgery involved, and small wires connected, but essentially I drove the nudibranch to the left and right when seeing the project. This website might have some background info that is useful.

How do you account for an animal on your BOM? Do you just put how much one would cost to get at a pet store, or do you have to include the price of training? What about the emotional value of the friendship you’ve built with it? Can you consider the hamster a team member, so its work would be “free”?

What if we use a baby instead of an animal? Can we really put the price on a life? Are babies free (you don’t have to pay money to make one) or do you have to account for the price of all of the time and consumables it uses? Is agency a requirement for team membership?

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In theory, this is correct.

In practice, most cultures recommend prefixing such creation with some combination of food, livestock, land, and/or perpetual commitment, most of which has a calculable value.

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Wow! I am slightly confused. Why was 87 on 816’s bot? Were they attempting to get two “breaches” for each time they went through a defense?
It would have been interesting to see…if it had worked.

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I don’t know how the rest of this thread has not been a discussion about this pun.
I laughed aloud at work.

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Yes. 87 had no auton (except to bash into the DS wall and knock laptops off), and 816 did have one.

Turns out 816 forgot to put in the bolts for like 1/2 of their drive train for that match after breaking it in the previous match, so sadly it didnt work. Hit me up sometime on the Discord and I can hop in voice to tell the whole story. Much better out loud than via text.

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#teamPigeon. Down with #teamCrow.

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I’m sorry but this won’t fly with the GDC.
On another note however, CTRE may have been on the right track with the Pigeon IMU.

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