Archive of FRC parts images and descriptions

I’m aware of the unofficial mechanism encyclopedia, the vendor sites, findrobotparts and some other sites but is there a “Catalog or Archive” of all of the parts, including historically? I’m curious because at some point the documentation and info about stuff like the Crio, Victor motor controllers, Rnet, etc will all go out the wayside.

Edit: good example was the FRC electrical bible. That is mostly gone now and I can’t find good links for it anymore. That had so much of this info

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Team 358 has some awesome info on their site, lots of super cool info about old frc control system and things

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It would be cool to create frc-docs pages for previous years (instead of current or future years).

Beyond just FRC parts (assuming this refers to game pieces and field elements) has anyone thought about organizing a large scale library of CAD files between teams, code has been pretty standardized between GitHub and git lab but finding old robot CAD tends to be a chase all over the place to see if some files are hidden in the corner of teams websites

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CAD would probably be significantly harder. I know that my team has difficulty even getting to our old CAD due to different versions of Autodesk Inventor. This has gotten way better with OnShape.

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I do understand the difficulty but even if conversions aren’t nice having a large database would be extremely helpful just coming from programming it’s very standard to reference dozens of other teams and open source projects code going back a decade during just one season.

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So in my mind I meant documentation for vendor parts, obscure old gearboxes but game/field elements and game pieces is actually a good point too. CAD files for KOP items used to be common and solidworks had the “digital catalog” each year but that’s not including everything. I know the files would add up over time but digital data storage for CAD, manuals and Photos is way less than storing match footage archives for every team. And having documentation, cad and access to old stuff would be useful definitely. Maybe this could be another part of frcZero if there’s not something purposely made for this already

It wouldn’t be too much data I’ve got 10TB of storage that I don’t mind giving up for something like that. But being able to document and just search for parts “4.5:1 gearbox” and see a few results from over the years including parts sold by companies or a parts list to fabricate it would be an amazing resource.

Anything not on the site or older if missing could also be hiding on @Mark_McLeod computer, or one of a hundred usbs.

I was gonna say specifically we have cloud servers for the site that aren’t costly whatsoever or even paying for an AWS bucket. But I also have a 72tb server that has no purpose sitting in my basement so maybe that’s a use for it as a file host… I’ll have to think about that one. But i agree its definitely not a large cost over time. The bandwidth would be the killer factor if lots of people wanted to access a home server at once.

That’s my only concern I can’t get fiber internet where I am right now, do you know how much AWS, google clouds bucket, or azure charge for data transfer and storage?

For frczero.org currently we have a storage/VM from Vultr that’s somewhere in the range of $5-10 a month for at least 10gb storage plus processing, etc to handle some stuff we have in future like API, blah blah blah. I’ve used AWS buckets for hosting my old static websites. I pay maybe $1.56 a month for storing 6 old websites worth of files there. That’s PDFs, images, html, etc. No videos though cuz those eat up storage and YouTube is free!

GitHub is also a semi decent place to store specifically CAD type documents but I don’t know the cost associated with that.

Costs for Vultr varies based on your hardware selections

https://www.vultr.com/pricing/

Edit: our last monthly cost for some random stuff we do on there was $3.80 so not really large at all

GitHub is theoretically free with public repositories but I don’t think that’ll hold when it’s 4-10 terabytes and someone accidentally clicks download to grab the entire repo.

You might have to pay once you are over a certain size I believe but I could be wrong but unless we had a huge series of git submodules that you let pick smaller chunks it’s not a great system for the reason you said. No one wants to download the whole file structure and it’s not easily searchable. It’s as bad as Andymark’s massive page with no headers, no particular order, just Ctrl +F and hope it has the matching item number… So maybe GitHub is out

GitHub does have a pretty good internal repository search, it might be possible to use gitLFS from GitHub for it and bundle a readme file with each parts cad which would provide images and a description for the search feature to link into.

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Could you store files in GitHub and then build out searchability on a seperate website that links to github files?

That could work too and is likely a good system I’d just have to check the terms of service to make sure it’s allowed to use them for file storage like that.

That’s definitely an option. Maybe a simple SSG with a nicer search feature?

i found this:

I don’t actually know how large CAD files typically are, but this certainly seems like it could be an issue. However, a seperate shell website wouldn’t actually need to be pulling everything from one place. Links could pull from multiple repositories across multiple accounts and even from other sources like OnShape or team websites (although I’m not sure how stable team website links would be).

A teams CAD usually gets up to around 5 gigs so it’s not massive massive but it’s not small, smaller then the machine learning datasets the community has put together but there are so many teams and parts that it’ll get pretty large.

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