Are we allowed to make a drive base in any configuration?

As long as the perimeter is below 120 inches?

You could make a 54 inch long by 6 inch wide robot if you felt so inclined, yes.

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Yup, just stay within frame perimeter (as in, a string wrapped around your robot should not be longer than the frame perimeter limit).

Heavily recommend taking a bit of time with your prototypes to determine spacing and such, don’t just willy nilly decide a length and width. This year there is a lot of consideration to be had about specific dimensions. I’m happy to elaborate if anyone wants.

Why stop there, you can go to with a 60 inch by zero inch robot.
But if you want the most area, I cannot recommend enough a circular robot.

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I am technically not sure if you would have an issue with the 6" minimum bumper length in that case, although since what you proposed is in fact a 2 dimensional robot this raises the question of how to apply bumper rules on a (non)dimension of 0"

:thinking:

ps. queue the angry groupthink on how “corners” and bumpers are applied to a circle.

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It’s not even a side you need to worry about.

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I believe your robot would only be bumpers, consisting of two 3/4" plywood sheets glued together, and noodles wrapped around the entirety of that.

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You may not like it, but this is what peak performance looks like.

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You can literally drop it on the field and leave, you don’t even need a driver. It operates all of your mechanisms for you.

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So this now begs the question: What if you designed a hypothetical robot with a 0" frame perimeter. Would you be required to have bumpers at all?

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Well of course, technically you have a 60 inch surface you need to protect.

No, what I meant was: If you had a “frame” that was 0"x0". Would bumper length rules even apply?

I would be not at all surprised to see a successful robot with a 40"x20" frame this year.

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No, I don’t think they would. You would have a hard time getting through inspection without bumpers though.

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Interesting, that would still fit in the trench and that might even make storing power cells easier, you would have to have an entirely custom drive train though.

Your robot must be at least 3 inches thick to hold the battery and electronics without it starting outside of frame perimeter.

Technically wider because you are required to have a PDP, which means your robot minimum must include the dimensions of a PDP.

I would like to remind you all of a legend, before even my time: L bot
3717 2012

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Why when I watch an FRC match from 2012 does it feel like I’m stepping back into 1984?

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Given that current bumper rules require frame perimeters to be convex, I’m not certain L-bot will still be legal in 2019.