Armabot 2019 Product Release

Armabot is back with another year of new innovations and products. Hopefully some of the below will perk your interests or inspire ever greater robotic accomplishments!

  1. Turret254 – The second COTS turret module specifically designed for FRC applications. This turret is a big boi, with a 13.25” internal diameter. It can easily fit the 2016 Steamworks ball right through the middle. The turret is belt driven and sports a 254 tooth belt for its pulley (yeah that’s kind of weird, but it worked for the first 2 gear auto of 2017). The belt is driven by a 16 tooth 8mm ID pulley. All you need is to add is a gearbox (wink @ 8mm VersaPlanetary) with the 2 inch bolt spacing and your set. The gearbox can be mounted from either top or bottom sides. Just having this on or near your robot can help inspire your students by reminding them of 254’s epic undefeated 2018 season!

https://www.armabot.com/collections/frontpage/products/turret254

  1. Differential Swerve Drive - This drive offers double the power of a standard swerve, but you’ll need double the programmers to get it working by stop build day. These will be ready to ship before the 2019 game release. Swerve bombs dropping late December.

https://www.armabot.com/collections/frontpage/products/differential-swerve-drive

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1518/8108/products/Differential_Swerve_Drive_-_A0067.PNG

  1. Avalanche LIDAR. This LIDAR sensor comes with an azimuth and elevation turret, and cables for chaining multiple LIDAR’s together using the I2C protocol. Comes in 3 ranges, 13.1, 6.5, 1.9ft. Shorter range has better resolution. These can mount on standard 1” rail hole spacing and be pointed where desired, then locked down in place. Yes, robots are more confident when outfitted with lasers.

https://www.armabot.com/collections/frontpage/products/avalanche-lidar

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1518/8108/products/Turreted_Avalanche_Sensor_-_A0072.PNG

  1. Armoder is Armabot’s offering of a range of optical encoders, 100, 200, 360, and 600 PPR (pulses per revolution), these have integrated double bearings, dust and splash proof metal enclosures. We including couplings for common FRC applications, 8mm for CIM type motors and a ½” hex rigid coupling for the easiest live axle drive train encoder integration you have ever seen. The sweet smell of victory is here.

https://www.armabot.com/collections/electronics-sensors/products/armoder

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1518/8108/products/Armoder_-_A0071.PNG

  1. F1 Intake – As seen in our FIRST Choice offering, these intake hubs hold 3/8” cord. The kits come with a standard length, but more can be purchased to fit your application. Lots of material and durometer options exist that can be tried out. With so many fingers your robot will never miss a grab!

https://www.armabot.com/collections/frontpage/products/f1-intake

There are a few other new items and possibly some more released before Deep Space comes out, so keep an eye on our website.

Thanks for all your support and build awesome robots in 2019!

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Some very interesting product releases, to say the least. I hope we can get CAD models for this stuff; I would definitely want to check them out before ordering most of these products. Some videos showing the products working wouldn’t hurt either.

What kind of couplings are included with the Armoders? You mention connecting to 8mm (presumably motor output) shafts and 1/2" hex live axles. Do these only connect to the end of the shaft, or can they connect to the middle of a live axle? If it’s only the end, I don’t think many applications have space for a large encoder at the end of the motor shafts. If it can mount in the middle of the shaft (especially a hex shaft), that’s a huge deal.

Looks like an interesting set of new products. The differential swerve modules aren’t as expensive as I expected, which is good. Could be a good fit for NEOs.

I was wondering where the encoders are sourced from, and what QC gets done on them to make sure they work properly. At a price point above that of the Mag Encoder, it would be nice to see some verification of quality. Also, what material are the couplers? Will they be available for purchase on their own?

Is the belt a friction drive on the slewing ring?

The OP cited a “254 tooth belt”. Looks like those teeth didn’t make it into the CAD.

The high-level descriptions are interesting. A few basic envelope dimensions and performance specs would make it easier to decide about purchasing these new items.

Sure, I just can’t tell if this belt interfaces with teeth on the slewing bearing or just a round surface.

Some very interesting product releases, to say the least. I hope we can get CAD models for this stuff; I would definitely want to check them out before ordering most of these products. Some videos showing the products working wouldn’t hurt either.

What kind of couplings are included with the Armoders? You mention connecting to 8mm (presumably motor output) shafts and 1/2" hex live axles. Do these only connect to the end of the shaft, or can they connect to the middle of a live axle? If it’s only the end, I don’t think many applications have space for a large encoder at the end of the motor shafts. If it can mount in the middle of the shaft (especially a hex shaft), that’s a huge deal.

Thanks Ari. We will be getting the CAD out soon like we have for all our other products. There is a video of our earlier diff swerve version running around over the summer, but I dont think well have time for more videos before build season. As for where encoders can be mounted, someone on CD already made a mid hex encoder, you should check it out.

Looks like an interesting set of new products. The differential swerve modules aren’t as expensive as I expected, which is good. Could be a good fit for NEOs.

I was wondering where the encoders are sourced from, and what QC gets done on them to make sure they work properly. At a price point above that of the Mag Encoder, it would be nice to see some verification of quality. Also, what material are the couplers? Will they be available for purchase on their own?

Thanks Anand. Yeah, this swerve has enough barriers of entry, making it super expensive would be a killer. For encoders, we will back our product, if you have one that comes in faulty or breaks not from abuse, send in the parts and well get you another. If there are enough requests for spare couplings well make those a separate item.

Is the belt a friction drive on the slewing ring?

Sure, I just can’t tell if this belt interfaces with teeth on the slewing bearing or just a round surface.

Hey Adam. We used a HTD belt flipped with teeth outward to act as a pulley (with a tight fit on the slewing bearing). Not quite as nice as the water jet versions, but it’s light weight and the right price.

The high-level descriptions are interesting. A few basic envelope dimensions and performance specs would make it easier to decide about purchasing these new items.

Hey Richard. Glad you kept the “interesting” theme going. I tried to give the release some levity but its a tough crowd this afternoon. Well get the outline drawings and models done soon.

Oh wow, so it’s a friction fit on both pulleys? Did you experience any slip in 2017 on the pinion side?

Oh wow, so it’s a friction fit on both pulleys? Did you experience any slip in 2017 on the pinion side?

I think we’re missing each other, let me try again. The pinion is a standard timing pulley, that drives a standard timing belt in the normal way. That timing belt interacts (teeth mesh) with a flipped timing belt on the slewing bearing. 2017 we had a cut belt that was glued on, for this the belt is a really tight fit with an uncut belt, I guess you could add glue also, but I really think something else would skip teeth or fail before it overcame the friction.

Thanks for the answers, Andrew! Just in case you missed it, what was the material of the encoder couplers again?
Also, for a paranoid FRC’er, is there a particular glue you would recommend to ensure the turret belt can’t come loose?

Thanks for the answers, Andrew! Just in case you missed it, what was the material of the encoder couplers again?
Also, for a paranoid FRC’er, is there a particular glue you would recommend to ensure the turret belt can’t come loose?

They are aluminum. I personally wouldn’t recommend using glue there, but something that has good adhesion to rubber would be a good start.

Thanks for the reply. I look forward to seeing the CAD when it comes out, and I’ll try to chase down the video you talked about.

You didn’t actually answer my question about the couplings for your encoders. I’ve seen the thru-hole hex encoder 5406 posted which is great, but that requires both 3D printing and modifying another COTS part. A fully COTS solution is, I think, something the FRC community is missing. There was talk a few months ago about possibly seeing a supplier bring one to market this year (with Anthony Lapp from 221robotics releasing his previous concept that never came to pass), so I was hoping this could possibly have been it. I would assume then that it’s not, otherwise you would have said so.

Digging that COTS turret, nice work. We put in for a couple of your intakes in FIRST Choice as well just to check them out, hopefully we get them.

We used the turret to mount our arm this year. https://i.imgur.com/FWEwqZL.jpg
People were thinking we had swerve drive because the arm would face whatever direction we wanted. I was a bit nervous about the strength of the bearing but no problems so far. We won Iowa with it.
If I was to ask for improvements, a bit more clearance under the motor plate for the screw heads to clear would be nice. As well as more holes around the ring to mount to. We had to drill more holes for mounting and now it’s a fabricated part so we can’t reuse it. As for the worry about slipping on the inverted pulley, not an issue at all. When we overload it, the pulley on the motor skips or it moves the tensioner. The flex of the motor plate will let the motor pulley skip so we added a zip tie to pull the back of the motor over a bit. If the tensioner slides the belt can derail. So Loctite is a good plan there.

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FYI
We received the creativity award on Hopper-Turing with this design.

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That is an awesome looking robot, congrats on the division award! Thanks for the above feedback, we will look into improvements. How important is it to you that you can reuse COTS parts year to year?

In our 6 years we have only had enough money to keep a robot alive through the next season this last year. We reuse as much as possible. Although part of this is we don’t have the space to store them either. The turret is a specialty item with lower reuse potential. And now that this robot has done so well I hope to keep it around.