Bearing solutions

What solutions do teams implement to address common issues with bearing such as slipping out or “eating through” extrusions, and how effective have these solutions been in improving the reliability and durability of your robot’s mechanisms?
My team uses something that we call “Bearing Housing” which is a ring that holds the bearing from its so-called “outer side” and prevents it from slipping out. I’ve seen teams like Robowanglers 148 and Barker Redbacks 4613 that used bolts to hold the bearing in place on some of their past robots, but I would love to know what are some of the other solutions that you guys use.

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We make our robot to have the bearings be press fit, so they don’t fall out, but for the most part everything we do has the shaft and the bearings constrained through either bolts tapped into the shaft or shaft collars or similar

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usually screws or press fit. Depending on the application we’ll make something similar to this:

If I need a bearing in a thin wall material, I just layer some material in that specific area.

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In an effort to standardize parts this year, we created some Onshape configurable parts. For almost all bearings we used this assembly. (It’s configurable, so there are several options depending on what is needed).

On our polycarbonate intake, we were able to still lose the bearings with a big hits. For State/Worlds we switched to these from TTB, and they worked extremely well for us.

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Flanges on the inside can help keep the bearing in if you have a full shaft. Screws can also be placed on the outside if the design didn’t originally use a retaining plate.

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REV also introduced a similar product this year:

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Seems like everyone’s got a good option for you to try.

WCP-0487 and WCP-0327 for 7/8" OD bearings
WCP-0488 and WCP-0328 for 1.125" OD bearings

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We tap the end of the shaft and use a washer (blue part) that is smaller than the diameter of the inner race so that it can spin, then use a screw. This has to be the case on both sides so that the shaft is captured.

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It also has to be a rigid mechanism. I’ve seen this method used on polycarb intakes, which flex when hit causing the bearings to pop out, even though it “seems” fully constrained when in a static setting while assembling/repairing.

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In that case, we also tap 4 holes into the polycarb real close to the bearing holes so that when we thread screws into those holes, their heads overlap with the outer race/flange of the bearings to hold them in.

The additional holes around the bearing holes don’t seem to weaken the polycarb too much as long as there’s enough extra in that area to begin with.

Another solution (which is fast to apply at competition) is to just toss a 2 piece shaft collar on the other side of the polycarbonate plate. This constrains the bearing (via the shaft) with a washer/bolt on one side of the plate and the collar on the other. Quick and dirty.

I have wanted to make mini gimbals (1 &2 degrees of freedom) to support floppy intakes and shafts. With summer cad/mfg plans probably being messed up this year this is a nice small project I could take on pretty easily.

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We have the same thing, we have put shaft collar

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Ive just made plates out of sheet metal with a clearance hole in the center and 4 holes for mounting around it

To be clear, the screws I talked about are designed into the mechanisms from the start for bearing retention so we shouldn’t ever have to deal with bearings popping out at competition. (Emphasis on shouldn’t)

we usually just drill a few holes around the edge of the bearing flange (or have it designed with them already there) and rivet it in place.

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