Best swerve drive module?

We’re starting to think about swerve drive for next year…. Pros and cons of different options, motor types, encoders, etc?

Has anyone tried the new Swerve and Steer from AndyMark?

What should we be thinking about? :grin:

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There is a recent discussion here.

As for the swerve & steer, I had a 3 wheel chassis using the gen 1 modules running as a testbed since summer 2016. It finally died on me this past fall after a long service as a defense bot.

COTS modules
SDS-> MK4/MK4i
WCP->Swerve X
Thriftybot-> Thrifty swerve
Andymark-> Swerve & Steer
Armabot-> Microswerve/Differential Swerve

Armabot also sells modules, although I haven’t heard how well they work. They do seem to sell the only COTS differential swerve, in addition to a cheaper Neo swerve w/ 775 steering.

If sorting by ELO, it’s WCP modules (1323).

If sorting by OPR, it’s SDS Mk4i (254).

In reality both vendors have top tier modules and the differences are relatively minor. The offerings from other vendors are fine, but are a generation or two behind these two vendors.

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I’m not up on my acronyms, what are ELO and OPR?

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They’re like Whose Line points.

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ELO and OPR here are referring to the ELO and OPR of the teams in parentheses that are using said modules.

OPR stands for Offensive Power Rating (Ranking?)
ELO stands for, well, nothing… It is a magic number, at least partially explained by this Wikipedia page Elo rating system - Wikipedia

As @Andrew_Schreiber said, they’re like Whose Line points (at least, without some additional context).

Elo isn’t an acronym (unless you’re talking about the band Electric Light Orchestra). It’s a rating system first developed by Arpad Elo for Chess, and then later adapted for any number of other competitive games. Folks need to stop typing Elo in all caps.

OPR is “Offensive Power Rating,” which is an attempt at isolating how many points individual teams contribute to the score of a match via matrix algebra.