Brads and the Gyro Chip

Posted by Trevor McManus at 2/16/2001 4:23 PM EST

Student on team #504, RoBUCtics, from Red Bank Regional High School and Jesel.

I’m wondering about the data that the gyro chip and the data it sends.

I believe it sends data from a range of + or - 64 degrees. So when this is converted to brads, would it be between 170 and 84 brads?

Posted by Trevor McManus at 2/16/2001 4:42 PM EST

Student on team #504, RoBUCtics, from Red Bank Regional High School and Jesel.

In Reply to: Brads and the Gyro Chip
Posted by Trevor McManus on 2/16/2001 4:23 PM EST:

Sorry, wrong brads, that was my reduced number for an if…then statement. I meant between 89 and 165 brads.
Unless of course, I’m still wrong. I’m kinda writing this in a rush.

Posted by Trevor McManus at 2/16/2001 4:52 PM EST

Student on team #504, RoBUCtics, from Red Bank Regional High School and Jesel.

In Reply to: Whoops
Posted by Trevor McManus on 2/16/2001 4:42 PM EST:

Brads this time, 45 and 209. I can never remember when to divide or multiply

Posted by Tim Gates at 2/16/2001 11:36 PM EST

Engineer on team #288, RoboDawgs, from Grandville High School and X-Rite/Delphi.

In Reply to: Brads and the Gyro Chip
Posted by Trevor McManus on 2/16/2001 4:23 PM EST:

The gyro chip gives a rate (radians(degrees) per second)in the form an analog signal. At rest the output is 2.5VDC, 2.5 towards 5VDC when rotating one direction and 2.5 towards 0VDC the other. The faster the rotation the higher the rate. The robot controller has AtoD convertors that provide your PBase code with approx. 127 at rest and 128-254 and 128-0 when rotating. You can also remove the “per second” from the rate and accumulate angle.

Hope that helps
Tim Gates

Posted by Jay Lundy at 2/17/2001 4:10 AM EST

Student on team #254, The Cheesy Poofs, from Bellarmine College Preparatory.

In Reply to: Brads and the Gyro Chip
Posted by Trevor McManus on 2/16/2001 4:23 PM EST:

: I’m wondering about the data that the gyro chip and the data it sends.

: I believe it sends data from a range of + or - 64 degrees. So when this is converted to brads, would it be between 170 and 84 brads?

Our team never really bothered converted the input from the gyro into any kind of degrees. We simply used the number striaght from the gyro to create a variable that stores the angle from the original position and it always keeps moving to attempt to balance. We have been tweaking the numbers for about a week (we have several ways of changing how the robot reacts) and now it balances about 60% - 75% of the time.