Cable protector bumper issue?

Max height of the bumpers is 7" outside the HAB. If you drive over the cable protector, will refs be calling fouls or is a minor bump generally overlooked?

Edit:
To add, we’re looking at 7" because that still only provides 2" under the bumpers to go over the HAB ramp.

R25. Except as allowed per G23, BUMPERS must be located entirely within the BUMPER ZONE, which
is the volume contained between the floor and a virtual horizontal plane 7½ in. (~19 cm) above the
floor in reference to the ROBOT standing normally on a flat floor. BUMPERS do not have to be
parallel to the floor.

Any angling of the robot caused by the cable protector or hab platform ramp doesn’t really impact the legality of the bumpers with respect to the bumper zone. Of course, if you have a mechanism to lift yourself up at the end game and deploy it outside of the hab, that’s a different story. But just driving over these items of the field would not make your bumpers illegal.

3 Likes

You should be OK as per R25.

R25. Except as allowed per G23, BUMPERS must be located entirely within the BUMPER ZONE, which
is the volume contained between the floor and a virtual horizontal plane 7½ in. (~19 cm) above the
floor in reference to the ROBOT standing normally on a flat floor. BUMPERS do not have to be
parallel to the floor.

This measurement is intended to be made as if the ROBOT is resting on a flat floor
(without changing the ROBOT configuration), not relative to the height of the ROBOT
from the FIELD carpet. Examples include:
Example 1: A ROBOT that is at an angle while navigating the FIELD has its BUMPERS
outside the BUMPER ZONE. If this ROBOT were virtually transposed onto a flat floor,
and its BUMPERS are in the BUMPER ZONE, it meets the requirements of R25.
Example 2: A ROBOT deploys a MECHANISM which lifts the BUMPERS outside the
BUMPER ZONE (when virtually transposed onto a flat floor). This violates R25.

R25 considers a plane defined by the lowest 3 points of your ROBOT (typically your wheels) and a plane parallel to the first, with the planes separated by 7.5" (not 7"). Your BUMPERS must always be in that space, except for the HAB zone exemption. You can drive in a manner that launches your ROBOT fully into the air or run over a CARGO and be fully compliant.

1 Like

I would say technically the floor went up, not your bumpers. :stuck_out_tongue:

Sure, however you can be rules compliant with R25 while you are completely airborne, since it is a virtual floor. Bumps in the floor have no bearing on compliance with R25. However, R25 is continuously assessed against the current ROBOT configuration. If going airborne (or over a big bump) causes some part of your ROBOT to become lower than the wheels (a floor pickup that is resting on the floor and not constrained for example), this will define the bottom measurement plane, and likely cause you to violate R25. Mechanisms that lift the ROBOT off its wheels will also likely violate R25.

Previous years have applied this test by placing the ROBOT on a flat floor and assessing once it comes to rest, such that mechanisms that hang down below the wheels if the robot is elevated but are free moving not violating the rule. This is not the way the rule currently is written. Would be a great Q&A question.

It’s not?

R25. Except as allowed per G23, BUMPERS must be located entirely within the BUMPER ZONE, which
is the volume contained between the floor and a virtual horizontal plane 7½ in. (~19 cm) above the
floor in reference to the ROBOT standing normally on a flat floor. BUMPERS do not have to be
parallel to the floor.

R25. Except as allowed per G23, BUMPERS must be located entirely within the BUMPER ZONE, which
is the volume contained between the floor and a virtual horizontal plane 7½ in. (~19 cm) above the
floor in reference to the ROBOT standing normally on a flat floor . BUMPERS do not have to be
parallel to the floor.

and then the Blue BOX bit about “without changing the ROBOT configuration” and “virtually transposed”.

If you move a mechanism, powered, to a position, such that when transposed to a floor violates R25 you are in violation (this is example 2). However what happens when the mechanism is hanging down (due to gravity and the lack of a limit stop). If you “virtually transpose” this configuration it may be in violation. If you picked this robot up and placed it on a flat floor the violation generating mechanism would move up and you would then be ok. So do you assess the instantaneous configuration, or the final resting configuration if you placed it on a flat floor?

Without defining “standing normally”, “as if resting”, and “virtually transposed”, and clarifying if the ROBOT configuration is frozen and assessed or allowed to come to rest we don’t know how the rule works.

The strictest interpretation of the current language in R25 considering the Blue Box has the lowest 3 points at any instant in time defining the bottom plane. At all times your BUMPERS must be contained between this plane and a parallel plane 7.5" up.

In previous years they have interpreted similar rules to allow/ignore parts that just hung down due to gravity. Basically they took into account powered versus free moving mechanisms when deciding the “ROBOT configuration” to be assessed. However last years rules did not give us the ability to power mechanisms down through the bottom. Last years interpretations don’t drive this years.

I always advocate for designing to the strictest current interpretation (as defined by the Manual and the Q&A), since that will get us through inspection. Quite willing to take advantage of rule loopholes, but do so with the knowledge that they may be closed or amended up to the moment that we go to an event. I consider amending and loosening rules at the last moment to be truly evil and almost as bad as amending and tightening them, but that is entirely another discussion.