Clippard Air Tank Ports

We have a bunch of Clippard’s Air Tanks (the polypropylene ones) and the little white tube-in pieces have fallen out of some of the tanks. Does anyone know if there is any replacements for them? I can find the tank but I’m having trouble finding the clips.

https://www.clippard.com/part/AVT-PP-35 tank for reference

Here’s a topic that is about the same thing. It basically says that you can’t replace them and that you need to use a different air tank or buy new ones.

Sounds like you now have some scrap plastic. Those fittings are integral and are pressed and ultrasonically welded into the casing. If you try to yank the hose out with brute force and pull out the fitting too, the tank is no longer usable and the fitting is not serviceable. Also trying to modify or replace the fitting would fall under the FRC rules of “illegally altering a pneumatic device”.

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Alright, thanks you two :+1:
Very interesting how it’s illegal though :thinking:

Honestly, I’m a bit surprised plastic tanks are allowed at all. After a number of plastic tanks exploded on teams due to over-tightened brass fittings into plastic tanks in 2014* resulting in potentially injurious shrapnel, FIRST outlawed those tanks and now only allows plastic tanks if they have original factory plastic-push-in fittings.

* 2014 was the first year plastic tanks were allowed if I recall correctly.

I’m honestly surprised how many teams don’t realize anything else is legal. Last year we ran a 1 gallon aluminum tank from ARB that was rated at 150 PSI I believe, and wasnt modified, and had many people questioning if it was legal. At a couple events, inspectors didnt think it was, but after showing them the tag on the tank, the data sheet we had printed out, and the rules, they were fine with it. But a couple times an event it felt like (at least at district events), we had inspectors stopping by due to reports of us using an illegal air tank.

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Totally agree! Prior to 2014, the standard FRC air tanks were actually clippard cylinders with end caps at both ends and no piston. 3946 used two of these for Mini-Koopa in the 2018 post-season, tucked way back inside the rear end plate.

Prior to 2012 (? or around there) pneumatics were a much more heavily regulated system. Parts were only allowed based on what was in the KOP and what could come directly from the Bimba order form in the KOP and loose brass fittings. I still forget that is the case sometimes, and do a double take when I see automotive accumulators on robots.

Safety. Since that part of the tank is not user serviceable, how would one ensure that a user replaces it with the proper part (probably not available anyway) and employs the proper installation techniques needed to guarantee proper and safe operation afterwards?

Generally, non-user serviceable parts are not made available to the users so one would have to install an alternate part. This would be a modification of the tank.

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