Cybersonics 2003 Autodesk Inventor Submission

Cybersonics Technology Team 103 is pleased to announce their submission for the 2003 Autodesk Inventor Award. You can view it here

Cybersonics Inventor Group
Bridgett Jamison
James Bean
Brian Keating
Beckie Kieselbach
Kyle Kotch
William Marek

Mentor: Pete Kieselbach

What a great shifting design. Does it work well?

Looks good! The level of detail is impressive.

*Originally posted by sanddrag *
**What a great shifting design. Does it work well? **

It works quite well, actually. Using chain drive (instead of gears or belts) makes it tolerant of small misalignments which lets us use the robot frame to locate the components. That saves weight over a self-contained transmission assembly.

Shifting is very positive. and using a single air cylinder and linked clutches makes sure both transmissions are in the same gear.

We built a speed sensor circuit to give more positive speed control and allow us to go to automatic shifting, but ran out of time and weight to put it on the robot. Something to add next year.

*Originally posted by Jeff Waegelin *
**Looks good! The level of detail is impressive. **

Thanks! Our Inventor group really flogged themselves to put this together and will be happy to hear that.

*Originally posted by petek *
**Shifting is very positive. and using a single air cylinder and linked clutches makes sure both transmissions are in the same gear.

We built a speed sensor circuit to give more positive speed control and allow us to go to automatic shifting, but ran out of time and weight to put it on the robot. Something to add next year. **

Did you make that disk withy the pins or buy it? If it was bought, where did it come from? Also, it is shift on the fly right?

Automatic is cool but I would stick with manual so I could have the choice between speed and power right at my fingertips if I was driving.

*Originally posted by sanddrag *
**Did you make that disk withy the pins or buy it? If it was bought, where did it come from? Also, it is shift on the fly right?

Automatic is cool but I would stick with manual so I could have the choice between speed and power right at my fingertips if I was driving. **

We made the clutch disk and pressed the pins in. Getting that and the hex broach through the center straight was probably the trickiest part of the whole robot.

There are downloads of the Inventor files for these parts here .

The automatic was to have manual override for that very reason. Probably more importantly though, speed sensing would give the controller feedback on actual motor speed, which would have made balancing the drive simpler.