Disabling Autonomous

Well, at regionals, some teams when wanting to disable their autonomous mode, would have their human player come back between 10 and 15 seconds. This would be fine for a team which doesn’t have an operating robot, but for some teams, I ask, why didn’t/couldn’t you upload a blank autonomous code so that you would not lose part of your human control time?

My team, 254, took advantage of this. As one of the two human players, I stepped back on the mat at 12 seconds whenever we did not want to run our autonomous. This was mostly only during practice when only one team wanted to run autonomous each time, but we used it once during the playoffs. We decided to have only one robot of our alliance run its autonomous period based upon which robot had bins in front of it. One of the coaches signaled us as to which should get on the mat.

Also, as long as the human player gets on the mat between 10 and 15 seconds, there is no penalty during the driver control period. It is only after 15 seconds that the robot is disabled during the driver period.

Yea we did that, We had an auto mode that really wasnt an auto mode, the robot just sat there, and did nothing

Yeah, I programmed that into our code, too. Easiest code I’ve ever written!

Our team got the autonomous to work perfectly on both sides and left it. Why change something that works? We didn’t wanna risk having to recode it and something messing up (i.e. once or twice the RC didn’t keep the uploaded code and kept the old one for some reason) and if something breaks, you might not have much time to recode it in the pits, or just if something bad happens (i.e. laptop runs out of power) you are still alright. Just made it easy and you didn’t have to worry bout swapping things out. Only problem was at UCF the mats didn’t seem to work sometimes and they still ran autonomous if yo uwaited till 12 or 13 seconds.

Um, why would you risk hurting your good auto at all? Just save the correct auto and upload a BLANK auto. It takes 15 seconds.

*Originally posted by monsieurcoffee *
**Um, why would you risk hurting your good auto at all? Just save the correct auto and upload a BLANK auto. It takes 15 seconds. **
Why not just step on the pad late? It takes 11 seconds.

There’s no advantage to a blank auton mode; you do not lose driving time, as you stated at the start, and you don’t risk screwing anything up. Yes it does happen; robot controllers are strange little devices, and sometimes do run the wrong program when not reset (or whatever else).

Yes the mats where terrible i wasnt the human player, but he would say that he was having pr oblem with the mats. I did human player for like 1 practice match and ya i dont think thye had the mats working for practice cause it sitll ran are cod

Our team had a set of rotary thumb switches and about 5 auto programs each with several variables, technically 20+ different autos. Left side, Right Side, added time delay (2 seconds) could all be changed by changing the numbers

3 switches
switch 1 Is what side we are on (1 or 2)
switch 2 is the actual autonomous type we are using (0-5)
switch 3 is time delay (setting to 1 = +2 seconds before program runs)

setting it to 000 runs no auto at all.

It worked rather well.

*Originally posted by jonathan lall *
**Why not just step on the pad late? It takes 11 seconds.

There’s no advantage to a blank auton mode; you do not lose driving time, as you stated at the start, and you don’t risk screwing anything up. Yes it does happen; robot controllers are strange little devices, and sometimes do run the wrong program when not reset (or whatever else). **

Very true; you don’t lose driver’s time, yet I think that due to the inconsistency of the human player pads, it is a greater risk to do that than to plug in blank code.

I’m just asking this because there were a few teams at various regionals who, through odd circumstances, couldn’t get back during qualifying. I’m not sure if it every happened during eliminations because that would just be devastating.

I can understand not wanting to trust the mat, but in my case they were all fine. I always did a little ‘test inspection’ with my feet to see that they were working fine. I also always used to check the human player indicators (red and blue lights on an electronics box at the game desk/checkmarks on the screen) to make sure the pads were responsive. In addition, I knew exactly how to step on one (all your weight on one foot on one corner is enough), because I took the whole assembly apart at West Michigan once. In our team’s case, we actually had a problem with what we thought was a blank program going berserk, so we decided the safest thing to do was have me jump on at 12 seconds. This also took some weight off my shoulders.

In addition, I knew exactly how to step on one (all your weight on one foot on one corner is enough), because I took the whole assembly apart at West Michigan once

How did you get to take one apart? How did they work, just out of curiosity, it seems like they wouldn’t be very complicated, probably just a presure sensor, touch switch, or membrane type switch…

I volunteered to help take the field apart. One thing I got to do (which I asked to do) was take apart one side of human player pads and its electronics and wiring, which were to be placed in boxes that fit them, which are in turn carted off to the next venue. This gave me a unique perspective into a lot of things, including my very own authentic HP bin (wut, wut).

Basically, all you can see is a square rubber pad, taped down by some duct tape. When you step on it, all you feel are these little bumps that go across it laterally. What I, and I understand a lot of my fellow HPs thought was that you had to step on these individual wires to set off the pad. In reality, they are just velcro that attach the rubber to the metal plate below. You’re basically standing on a digital scale, and thus, your weight on any part is acceptable. This is why I started moving forward on the “1” or the “3” (depending) of the MC’s countdown. My front foot is almost on the ground ahead, and I’m moving forward by the time the countdown is over. One thing I made clear of on the Jive forums is how the pads worked and how the electronics were set up. If you looked up on the screen in practice matches or looked at a certain box in the game desk, you could see what set off a human player pad and who was on. I also noticed there was a short delay after you stepped on before it registered. Another thing to note was that you in reality had 11 seconds to get back, and you have until the end of 10 on the clock. When I got back, if out of stride, my front foot would step on the corner of the pad and I’d quickly pull in my back foot to have them both on the pad, where most would take an extra step to get both feet on. I have a bunch of tricks of the trade i didn’t see other HPs doing while on the field too. :slight_smile:

As human player, I made it a point to be observant and intelligent about my role, even if it’s usually given to the high school quarterback. :slight_smile: