FRC 1477 Teaser 2020

Texas Torque is proud to present our 2020 Robot teaser competing at the FIT district events Listed below.
Dripping Springs (week 1)
Fort Worth (Week 3)
Houston (Week 4)

Good Luck to all teams!

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Very nice consistency on those shots! See you at the Houston Event. Best of luck!

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Impressive, Good luck guys!

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Looks good. I was even more impressed with it when I saw it in person last week. Good luck and we will see you in Fort Worth.

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5 seconds to fire all 5 balls, but when you hit every 3 pointer I guess it doesn’t matter.

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Not here to make excuses, but I will add in a disclaimer that the feed time is now less than half of that shown in the video. When the video was shot individual parts of our feed system were run manually using a controller with a button routed to each motor used but now we have an automated system that dumps them all out very quickly (1.5 sec to dump all 5 in reference to the latest video I have of it).

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Does this affect the consistency at all?

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We do see a very slight dip over the course of the volley(if I had to judge with just my eyes about a 3"~5" dip from ball 1 to ball 5). We do realize this is an issue and are currently experimenting with a Tungsten inertia wheel. (The tungsten is a bit overkill for FRC purposes brass or steel would make do for anyone else trying to make one.)

Awesome. If you are looking for some good numbers ours(we have 2) have an OD of 5.25in and a rotational inertia of roughly 8 lbs each and are just under 2 lbs.

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If a team is shooting from a safe zone, I think shooting speed will be overrated, which is understandable since seeing a robot fire 5 balls in a split second is really cool. Taking an extra second or two per volley is totally worth it if it means better accuracy. Since ball collection will likely take the most time in a cycle, that is going to be better at determining who the top robots are than shooting speed.

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Do you have any pictures of the inertia wheel that you are willing to share? How did you machine it?

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Yes, this mart was made outside of our lab by one of our sponsors, Halliburton, who makes drills for oil rigs and are very experienced making things out of tungsten. They first started by 3D printing the inertia wheel that students had designed and made a mold using this to cast the tungsten. The tungsten was then heated in a furnace and poured into the mold and left to cool down for about 2 days. After this the wheel had parts of the mold attached and not properly balanced so using an industrial lathe the wheel was then processed to a smooth and even finish which is very hard to get from a metal like tungsten. The entire process took about 4 days, and once again this is very much overkill for FRC purposes, but since we had access to the technology we decided to test it out. Also, did not have any role in the manufacturing process since the students on our team are not allowed to use machines at Halliburton, I’m just speaking from what was explained to me by our mentors from Halliburton. Here Is a picture of it we utilize 1/2’’ hex hub as well in order to mount it to the shaft.

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So how did you account for this on your CAW? Just running over numbers in my head, not seeing how a custom 1 time machined casting doesn’t cost more than $400 or what ever the part limit cost is… even though you didn’t probably pay for any of it, the FMV still needs to be accounted for…

You don’t need to cost tooling, so you can eliminate the mold itself. If you consider the sponsors members of the team (they’re referred to as mentors in the post), the labor goes away. That leaves the raw tungsten material… right?

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Can i eliminate the tooling? If i called up this company and wanted that made, pretty sure the cost of the tooling would be passed on to me.

This is a cool part, and hopefully the students were involved in the whole process and learned a bunch. I just want to make sure they can actually use it.

Correct, from the raw materials to the finished product was only worked on by mentors registered as members of Texas Torque so therefore, there is no cost for machining and we just account for the raw value of the tungsten which is not cheap at all but does not exceed $400.

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Brant, can you share the approximate RPM range you’re planning to spin this at? Or approximate gear ratio to the motors driving it?

I’m not sure exactly if that is legal since all out of house manufacturing is done by mentors of our team, but I’m sure that it is listed in the rules for BOM.

As for the part with the students, it has maybe been one of the coolest things I think we have made in my time on the team. The entire idea of making it out of tungsten was brought up as a joke by our build lead when we first discussed the inertia wheel idea. After saying this as a joke one of our mentors picked up on it and explained to us how easy it would be for him to make at work so we ran with it. It has definitely been a very cool experience to go through as in FRC we ar used to use the same materials and same machine processes year and year again.

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Do you notice a difference in how your robot turns when the flywheel is spinning?

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These RPM’s should not be universal for every shooter as there are different factors such as, wheel size and compression that account for the outcome of the shot. We are currently running anywhere from 3,800 RPM to 6,200 RPM depending on where we are shooting from.