Glove Control System?

Hey guys. I’ve been toying with the idea of having a glove control system for a few weeks now. Not the sort of Nintendo Power Glove route but rather simply for drive systems. I haven’t really ironed out specifics recently but at this point I’m thinking about using springed potentiometers and thin cables to translate wrist movement into drive control. I don’t even know if this is even a feasible option for the driver controls but I just wanted to see if anyone has tried this type of setup before. I know gloves have been used before but I don’t know if in this same way. If you have any experience with this control system or have tips please reply. Thanks

It will be a difficult challenge although it will be amazing if you pull it off, just remember to keep it intuitive. Also at the beginning of teleoperated period the driver will likely have to put it on which may or may not create issues for you.

I read some other post where the team with a type of glove control just plugged in a serial cable (connected to the glove) to the board at the beginning of the tele-operated period. I’m not sure if that’s totally legal nowadays, but as I said, at this point I’m just thinking up some prototypes for testing.

Just cause it was so then wont make it so later. It is a viable solution but remember to check the rules before going that route, even better post to the Official Q&A.

ive been playing with that idea since 2004 too i was thinking of using the p5 glove i just need to get some programing right … the one i had has water damage… dog draged it out in the rain … while i was out … unfortunately i am now clueless on programing since i graduated and then came back as a mentor… but it is completely plausible… if i find out any more ill share with you my findings

I believe he would be able to wear it during auto because the rules say that the control board must be a certain size except those worn by the driver. If it is off during auto, it takes up extra space.

Chris.

PS don’t qoute me on that, its just a vague recollection.

I have one of these:

http://www.vrealities.com/P5.html

Its pretty cool, and USB :frowning:

I’m sure I can modify it though…

Jacob

thats sounds really cool if you could pull it off please send pics of it to me.

As far as I know, you can wear it during autonomous, but it cannot be plugged into the control board.

Yeah… Looking at the glove the way it is currently designed, it is going to take some work to get this to work. I should be able to do it with a small PIC, but I had some other questions about the rules.

It uses both a wire and infrared(I think this is the wireless technology that it uses.) Would this not be allowed, due to the whole wireless controller thing? The other question would have to be about using a PIC as a complex decoder for the signals coming out of the device. I’m pretty sure this would not be allowed, seeing that the only microprocessor that you can have hooked to the OI Inputs is the IFI (crosstheroad) USB Chicklet.

Any thoughts on this?

Jacob

The Frog Force had a glove that controlled part of their robot. I dont know all of the detail but they were using it all year

Hmm… Well, you could legally use the finger controls as simple buttons to the OI, which would work. But any of the positioning stuff violates two rules. I haven’t seen Frog Force’s design, but my guess is that they are simply using switches, not relative position.

If memory serves me right, in 2004 (or 2003) 447 used glove controls for their robot. I don’t know how they did it but they were fairly bulky.

Obviously, this year’s rules don’t apply to future games, but can you back up this claim with the 2007 rules?

With ease.

<R83> All equipment connected to the joystick ports of the Operator Interface must be powered solely through the power available through the port. External power sources of any type are not permitted on any equipment connected to the joystick ports. Portable computing devices can not be connected to joystick input ports on the Operator Interface. Powerpassive devices (e.g. joysticks that draw their power solely through the Operator Interface joystick port) are permitted. The one exception to this rule is Innovation First Incorporated USB adapters (IFI Part Number USB-CHICKLET) may be used to connect USB devices to the joystick ports of the Operator Interface. If used, this USB adapter must be powered with a 7.2V battery similar to the back-up battery. Teams can not use power from the competition port or any other source to power the USB adapter. The USB adapter must be positioned within the OPERATOR CONSOLE so that the indicator lights may be seen during inspection and operation in a match.

All that says is that it can’t be powered externally. It is quite possible to run a microcontroller off of the power available on the joystick port; we did it successfully this year.

<R83> All equipment connected to the joystick ports of the Operator Interface must be powered solely through the power available through the port. External power sources of any type are not permitted on any equipment connected to the joystick ports. **Portable computing devices can not be connected to joystick input ports on the Operator Interface. **Powerpassive devices (e.g. joysticks that draw their power solely through the Operator Interface joystick port) are permitted. The one exception to this rule is Innovation First Incorporated USB adapters (IFI Part Number USB-CHICKLET) may be used to connect USB devices to the joystick ports of the Operator Interface. If used, this USB adapter must be powered with a 7.2V battery similar to the back-up battery. Teams can not use power from the competition port or any other source to power the USB adapter. The USB adapter must be positioned within the OPERATOR CONSOLE so that the indicator lights may be seen during inspection and operation in a match.

So yeah, the processor would have to accept the power from the joystick port, and so would the glove (which is USB complient… a lot of power). Also, I think the processor would be considered as a Portable Computing Device.

Although, perhaps an exception could be made with the GDC for this device in particular. Kind of like DDR pads don’t officially follow the rules, the GDC has allowed them. I think the intent of this rule is to prevent you from plugging in a computational aid into the joystick ports to run your bot (like somthing plugged into your dashboard that is getting real-time info, or a laptop that can tell the robot what the best place to score is, etc.)

Jacob

This is what I was getting at. The traditional (and sensible) interpretation is that PICs are not computers.

Perhaps, but there is still the power issue. I’m sure this thing consumes quite a bit of power (there is a wireless component (IR I believe) to it as well)…

Isn’t that another rule somewhere? No wireless stuff other than IFI 900mhz? It’s only IR (I think), but it still may be considered wireless.

I would love to be able to do this, but not if I build it and found out I can’t use it.

Jacob

That is my opinion as well, and seems to be backed by various FRC Q&As. This one from last year (I know, I know - last year is not this year) said that translators were not considered portable computing devices. This one from 2007 indicates that any USB->15 pin adapter (if such a thing other than the Chicklet exists) is legal as long as it does not draw external power. Logically, that would extend to any sort of adapter that does not require external power. Attached is a picture of our OI with the two adapter boards that we designed and used.

Regarding the original topic, if it’s USB couldn’t you just use the Chicklet and be done with it?

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