Has any team pulled of a fully autonomous match?

I don’t recall more specific numbers, but I seem to remember about 1 out of 3 matches or so. We got better in later weeks as we refined the conveyor system to cut down on totes jamming.

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Huh, that’s neat. I don’t know why but I really appreciate button boxes for some reason. Would you recommend them from a drive/competitive standpoint? If I have a say in that next year I’ll try to convince my team :slight_smile:

That year where no one asks to be driver because being the driver would have been more boring than a human player

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It depends on the game and your robot’s complexity. We don’t use one every year, but they can be really handy for robots that need a lot of controller button mappings. We built ours with the TI LaunchPad. The driver station sees it a USB controller just like a joystick or game pad.

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AKA Full court shooters in 2013. At least the human player got to throw some frisbees

@marshall wya?

It’s a really hard problem. In my opinion, it’s going to require a lot of data or a simple robot.

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Or a simple game task/challenge.

Sure. I think that falls under simple robot. I don’t mean simple in any specific definition (and certainly not derogatory - simple doesn’t mean bad) but simple in terms of “do a thing” (read: complete a cycle) and repeat.

Got it.

Not my initial interpretation of the words, but I’m basically on the same page.

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Was 71 in 2002 fully autonomous?

IIRC autonomous mode was introduced in 2003 with Stack Attack

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This is correct.

There was no auton in 2002 but 71 was fully predictable – their total domination strategy did not change.

Your Q&A minions appear to be trying hard at full auto, given their Q&A questions. I’m not sure if that’s a legitimate run at it, a case of CS102, or a zebra-striped herring.

(CS102: Oh, I can just automate everything, given enough detail on the inputs!)