How does your team handle passwords?

My team currently uses LastPass for managing passwords. What does your team do in terms of password management and password sharing?

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Our team personally doesn’t use a password manager cause we don’t have many passwords to remember. In my personal use though, I use Bitwarden as my password manager of choice

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If teams are having any trouble managing and sharing their passwords, feel free to share them with me and I will be happy to hold them for you and share them appropriately.

Edit: Since the original post is a wiki, feel free to just edit them in there and ping me once you’re done.

Edit 2: Since this post is no longer a wiki, feel free to send reply to this comment with all your identifying information.

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Passwords for what? Our answer varies based on what they access.

Each student is trusted to remember their own password to log into their school district accounts/computers.

The mentors and teachers are trusted with the password for the laptops that we have admin rights for, and when the programmers need to access the admin rights on those laptops they bring them to a teacher or mentor.

The passwords for social media accounts are managed by the select group of students with access to each account. The mentors have all of these passwords.

Do you mind holding on to my CD password? It’s password123. It’s so easy to forget.

Stored inside a safe, inside a vault, inside a volcano.

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Seconding this, Bitwarden is free and awesome.

For team use, no password manager was ever used, though with the amount of accounts that got created (and then lost) we probably would of benefitted from having some form of centralized spot for account logins…

I intentionally made this question open-ended. I’m referring to shared passwords like social media accounts. We would never ask people for their individual passwords.

Not to come off strong but… don’t! Avoid at all costs. Many services allow you to have multiple administrators/managers of an account each with their own personal password.

If you do need to share a password/email, use a google group or similar service.

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I write all of ours on post-it notes that I lose regularly and then have to go through the reset process for.

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On my high school team we kept all of our passwords in a Google Doc on the team’s account. Anyone who needed the passwords was given the password for the team Google account and then had access to all of the team passwords. We tried to keep all of the passwords similar to make it even easier*. Sure it’s not the safest way to store your passwords (I wouldn’t store any bank info or stuff like that in there) but at the end of the day most of these accounts are pretty low-risk for hacking.

I’m not sure how we do it on my current team; I don’t really deal with the team social media or any accounts that have one shared password. I have heard of a few different software packages that claim to manage passwords for teams. Each person makes an individual account and joins the team account, then the lead member (head mentor) can select which passwords to share with which people. But I haven’t actually ever used anything like that so I can’t say how well it works.

 
* With the exception of the programming laptop, after one of the students who knew the password logged on to play a game and ended up deleting the entire robot code, forcing me to start from scratch (backup your code, kids)

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We just use hunter2. Makes everything very easy.

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What do you use? I just see *******.

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Common mistake. You can’t copy and paste it.

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Austin, do you remember the password to this Youtube Channel?

Asking for a friend

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Have you considered using blockchain as your password manager? I hear it’s very secure, and the people at the office seem very excited about it.

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Thankfully, the only account I need to manage for team 3468 is Github, which isn’t an issue since Github has Organization “Accounts” so each member of the programming team just needs to make their own GitHub account, which I then grant access to the appropriate repositories.

Otherwise, yeah, Lastpass and similar password managers that have sharing functionality built in are probably your best bet. just make sure its a mentor or coach managing that, because its always frustrating when you find out there are like 3 YouTube channels or Twitter Accounts for the team and trying to figure out which we have access to, and if we can get any of the others closed or not because it was made by a student three years ago who has since graduated and we can’t get a hold of, or they don’t remember the password or even e-mail address they used anymore.

We used to use some variant of “FortniteEpicGamer” for all of our passwords back when our team was 90% freshmen, but have since transitioned to more varied passwords of higher security derived from memes within leadership

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hunter2

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I don’t understand, your message is just a bunch of asterisks???

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