Law Chains ⚙️

How we Can Calculates the Number Roller Chain between Chain1 and Chain2?What is the law of calculation?

I don’t know the math behind the calculation, but I have used this successfully before

I usually cross check with another online calculator and it comes out to the same results

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My team’s go to option for a lot of calculations like this is ReCalc. It has many nice features for belts, chains, and even cheat sheets for common fastener fits. The ReCalc chain tool has a bunch of handy math already done for you, all you need is the sprocket tooth counts and the desired CtC spacing to get the link count.

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A chain has a pitch , the general concept is just like sizing a timing belt.

If you know your desired sprocket ratios you can ajust the CTC distance such that the o’all chain length evenly divides into the number of links.
You can also do this in reverse for a given CTC distance and size the sprockets up/down to get close to the ctc distance while staying near the desired ratio.

Remember, chains may stretch some (dependent on a lot of factors), chains do not appreciate being run too tight, and may be able to tolerate some slack depending on your mechanism specifics.

If you are using a chain tensioner because the chain in the system doesn’t make a full revolution you can ignore everything about ctc distances, different rules are involved here for mechanisms.

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