pic: Lifts Down



Here you have a better view of the whole robot when the lifts are not extended. The lifts themselves are fully inside the robot so they will not risk damage, and the accumulator is mounted on a passive pivot to be inside the frame perimeter at the start of the match. The spools for our lifts are tucked in right behind the lifts. There is an identical spool on the other side of the robot for the other lifts, and both spools are mechanically linked with hex shafting to ensure that both lifts go up the same speed.

What inspired you to design a robot with an elevator on both sides over the standard single elevator?

Welcome to team doublelift!
Awesome looking robot, and impressive lift!

We also found this vital for simplifying control of two separate lifts. Seems to do the trick very well.

I am interested in what made you go with two lifts compared to one. We went with two so we could transfer the cube from one side to the other through our bot.

I am also curious why you guys have the driven wheels in the rear and omnis in the front rather than vice versa, something like 330 in 2010 to more accurately acquire and place game pieces.

What inspired you to design a robot with an elevator on both sides over the standard single elevator?

We decided to go with double lifts because we were thinking about having the intake swing around and shoot out the back of the robot. However, we didn’t have the time (or the weight) to make this pivot mechanism and so we scrapped it, put in a passive pivot, and kept our lifts. We also went way overboard with our intake itself and made it really heavy (almost 20 pounds), so having the double lifts helps there as well. So far the only problem we have seen is that both stages do not go up together (basically, on one side, the stages go up out of order, so it looks wobbly while going up and then straightens out at the top). We just need to tune the eccentric bushings on our lift to fix that. Also we’ve been having a minor issue with keeping rope tension constant between the sides, but overall the lifts work very well.

I am also curious why you guys have the driven wheels in the rear and omnis in the front rather than vice versa…

At first, we also had a set of driven wheels in the middle of the robot, but had to remove these as part of our weight-cutting measures. Originally, we thought having omnis in the front would allow us to make sharper turns. We haven’t had any handling or tipping issues, but thank you for that suggestion.

Welcome to team doublelift!

Thank you very much!

Maybe the O.P. has a different reason, but we started out with omnis in the rear and traction in the front and the drivers had an issue with control during turns. So we swapped them and the drivers were much happier with the turning, except when going in reverse.

2010 and 2015 both had omnis in front, the same configuration as this robot.

We were originally going to have our intake on an active pivot, and our plan was to have the intake mechanism swing around and shoot out the back. We had to scrap this idea late in build season and so we just kept the dual lifts.

It’s good that we did because our intake became super overcomplicated and weighs around 20 lbs.

We had this same configuration for our offseason robot last year, and we loved it, so we decided to stick with it again this year. It works well in terms of accuracy and allows us to make sharp turns (when the lifts are down, of course!)