pic: Team 1099 Drivetrain Powered Climber/Pick-Up



After a regular season where we were not happy with our results, especially since we failed to qualify for New England District Championships, we decided to work hard to make some improvements with our robot. Therefore…

Team 1099, The DiscoTechs, from Brookfield, CT proudly present our 2017 Off-Season Robot, Maximum Overdrive 2.0.
Key Features:
-6 CIM Shifting Gearboxes
-Drivetrain Powered Pick-Up AND Climber (with Velcro strap)
-Pneumatic Flaps on Gear Holder Helps Loading
Gears in the Retrieval Zone
-Quick and Easy Passive Gear Delivery for Pilots
-2x 775 pro Shooter with Speed Control (capable of hitting 4-6 fuel in auto as a tiebreaker)

Here’s a short video demonstrating some of these features, many of which were added in the past month or so: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2MiCGoq8sQ&t=0s
Feel free to ask me any questions if you have them!
See you at CT Off-Season events!

Ok, so a few questions:

  1. Is this a modification of your competition bot or an entirely new bot?
  2. Have you run into issues with intake speed? It looks like your intake runs off the same shaft as the climber, which I would think would be a bit slow for an intake, unless, of course, if the drive just has enough power that you can run your climber at intake speeds.
  3. Have you found the inability to climb/collect while stationary or the reduced speed/effectiveness while driving slower to be a detriment at all?
  4. Is your climber shaft made out of PVC (looks like it)? If so, are you worried about it shattering when it hits the Davit?
  5. Gear floor pickup or slot-load only?
  6. What drive gearboxes are you using and what ratios?
  7. What is the reduction (if any) between the drive and intake/climber?
  1. It’s a modification of our competition bot.
  2. We decided that since we’re not focusing on fuel too much, we were willing to compromise some of our fuel picking up abilities. We are still able to pick up balls, the pickup is just not as efficient as it was with just a 775 pro powering it. As for speeds, the climber actually doesn’t require too much speed to climb, but we can obviously adjust the pickup speed by adjusting our drivetrain speed. And since the robot is driving forwards while picking up the balls, it happens in one fluid motion.
  3. We have our first competition this Saturday, so we’ll see how the robot preforms, but climbing or picking up balls while stationary doesn’t seem too bad of a trade-off.
  4. There is a 3/8" steel shaft inside of the PVC that we use to drive the entire shaft. We don’t have much concern over shattering the PVC since it is very think PVC and we aren’t going extremely fast when we climb (not like 180).
  5. Slot-load only from the human player station.
  6. Drive train gearboxes: https://www.vexrobotics.com/3cimballshifter.html with short shiftier shaft 3.68 ratio spread. Final ratios: Low gear = 10.41:1, High gear = 2.83:1.
  7. Yes, there is a reduction from the drive train to the climber. 22 tooth to a 26 tooth sprocket.

can you talk more about the Drive-train powered climber/pick-up how does it work.

I think I can speak to the way their mechanism works, having done something similar on our robot this year, and seeing it up close at CT state champs.

The mechanism is just a double sprocket on the front wheel of their drive train which allows a chain to run from the drive directly up to their climber and ball intake. This allows them to use 2-3 CIMs with minimal reduction off the drive train.

Team 558 chose to do this for our first 3 events because it saved on motor space and weight but eventually found that it was mostly just for novelty and that driving into the rope caused swinging that made our climb unpredictable.

  1. It’s a modification of our competition bot.
  2. We decided that since we’re not focusing on fuel too much, we were willing to compromise some of our fuel picking up abilities. We are still able to pick up balls, the pickup is just not as efficient as it was with just a 775 pro powering it. As for speeds, the climber actually doesn’t require too much speed to climb, but we can obviously adjust the pickup speed by adjusting our drive train speed. And since the robot is driving forwards while picking up the balls, it happens in one fluid motion.
  3. We have our first competition this Saturday, so we’ll see how the robot preforms, but climbing or picking up balls while stationary doesn’t seem too bad of a trade-off.
  4. There is a 3/8" steel shaft inside of the PVC that we use to drive the entire shaft. We don’t have much concern over shattering the PVC since it is very think PVC and we aren’t going extremely fast when we climb (not like 180).
  5. Slot-load only from the human player station.
  6. Drive train gearboxes: https://www.vexrobotics.com/3cimballshifter.html with short shiftier shaft 3.68 ratio spread. Final ratios: Low gear = 10.41:1, High gear = 2.83:1.
  7. Yes, there is a reduction from the drive train to the climber. 22 tooth to a 26 tooth sprocket.

Warstolrem talked about it a little, and we actually got our idea for it from 558 and other robots who used a drive train powered climber during the season. We seem to be able to have more control over our climb with the drive train powered climber, so we have less “Tarzan” action than other teams.

Mechanically:
There’s a double sprocket on the front wheel, allowing a chain go directly up to our pickup shaft that extends out over that front wheel. The chain drives the pickup shaft whenever we move - spins counterclockwise when moving forward to pick up balls and spins clockwise when moving backwards. The pickup still works with the climber on it, but not as effectively as before (since some of our bands had to be removed). In the center of the pickup shaft there’s a strip of velcro that hooks onto the rope.

How it works:
The rope is dropped and we line up our strip of velcro to it. This was actually our hardest part at CT State Champs, since it needed to be aligned perfectly in order for it to work. We’re thinking of adding some guides to help the rope attach correctly the velcro easier. Once we are lined up and attached we go up in about 3 seconds and then stay up there without a physical stop. The operator presses a button that puts a constant voltage to the drive motors to keep the robot on the touch pad.