pic: Team Rush 27 - Shooter Concept



An early concept drawing of our shooter…

Ooh… So pretty.

Is this a stationary attachment, or is it turning, and if so how many times?
If so, where are the wires headed?

Great CAD so far. Hope to see it soon.

Its seems to be made to turn. You can see a globe motor mounted upside down to the left. I think they were just to lazy to actually make the sprocket and at the moment there is just a solid ring.

pictures of the turret have already surfaced…so yes it spins.

it spins as much as we want it to, though i doubt it would ever travel more than 180 degrees. this turret is for precision movement…it mimicks the camera gimble.

as for wires, i can’t say. we’ve managed to build a turret for the last 5 years…wires have never been a “go,” “no go,” item…they will most likely run around the back of the device and be placed inside some slick looking wire loom. leave plenty of slack…and bam!, your wired. :smiley:

i’ll let the electric knobs work on that. :wink:

Its seems to be made to turn. You can see a globe motor mounted upside down to the left. I think they were just to lazy to actually make the sprocket and at the moment there is just a solid ring.

not too lazy…

there is no sprocket involved. see either picture already posted. it is a 129 tooth, 12DP, 20 degree PA spur gear.

that is hard to draw! not to mention frivolous. keep in mind the title of the pic…“concept.” this implies that you aren’t seeing a completed drawing.

I’ve been curious to see what some other folks do to ‘shield’ their mechanisms as per the rules. Do you plan to cover the wheels more than what is shown or do you feel that the standoffs are adequate?

I’ve been curious to see what some other folks do to ‘shield’ their mechanisms as per the rules. Do you plan to cover the wheels more than what is shown or do you feel that the standoffs are adequate?

i think the standoffs are adequate. it is a tough call though…

as designed there is plenty of room to insert a finger and have it severely mangled. but there is enough room to keep from having the finger wedged. for now the standoffs stay.

there are also other mechanisms near or around the shooter…these may ultimately provide enough protection from the shooter wheel.

so, how do the balls go from your other pictures to be put within the wheels to shoot towards the goal? the force of pushing them upwards allows them to get sucked in with in your shooter and there it goes?

Seems like it would be safer without the standoffs. I’m thinking the standoffs would help the wheel suck your fingers in, instead of keeping them out. Full shield or no shield is what I say.

so, how do the balls go from your other pictures to be put within the wheels to shoot towards the goal? the force of pushing them upwards allows them to get sucked in with in your shooter and there it goes?

the balls simply transfer from the ball elevator, through the turret and into the shooter. you can’t see from these pics, but the design allows for the lift rollers to get extremely close to the underside of the turret…balls pop up through the bottom and fly away.

the design was executed in such a way that the location of the turret and the elevation of the gun don’t change the loading location.

I want me one of those!
…or two :stuck_out_tongue:

I should have looked at this post first - answers my question from the picture in your other post. Looks sweet.

Craig

Whoever designed that, has skill.

meh. they downloaded stuff. slackers :smiley:
but wow. detail. with we had the resources to pull sumthing like that off.
if you dont connect the pitching of the 2 sides, then you can control more aspects of the ball.
launch angle, direction are obviously doable, and by changing the rotation speeds of either side will change the spin sideways, and by haveing a different launch angle with right and left you’ll have a sorta rifling rotatioin too. fun!!

Using what software?
I can crank that out in about 10-15 minutes in SolidWorks.
But then again, I have been using it for at least 3-4 years now.

Elgin,

I have a new found respect for you now that I know you use SolidWorks.

I have been using it since 1997 and the ThunderChickens have been using it since 2001.

Anthony,

Nice shooter. I’m not a big fan of the side by side, but you guys looked like you have a good design. BTW, I agree with Elgin, it is pretty easy to draw gears in SW, but it is definitely unnecessary.

-Paul

Thanks Paul.

Yeah, basically to make it from scratch in solidworks, I would draw one tooth, and rotate however many times.

Nowadays, gear manufacturers have all CAD drawings in easily converted formats for your applications that you could just drag and drop in.

We customized a gear just the other day from the firstcadlibrary by extruding cuts and what not, and it was pretty straight forward.

ya im not realy a fan of the side by side wheels either. wat i think would be alot better is putting them vertical so u dont have a problem with turning while the ball is in flight due to one whele spining faster/slower than the other. the vertical one would somewhat elimate this factor and it would be a better idea if the bottom one is spinning faster than the top to creat back-spin on the ball. although i looks realy good

Keep in mind that if the wheels aren’t spinning at exactly the same speed, the balls won’t fly straight. Every motor, even if they’re the same design, will spin at different speeds.

A simple chain and sprockets can be used to ensure that both wheels are spinning at exactly the same speed, and additionally eliminate the need for two motors, saving weight. In our mockup testing, this actually outperformed alot of other methods.

But couldn’t you have the same problem with verticle rollers moving different speeds? And instead of having poor accuracy left and right it is poor accuracy up and down? it’s a circular goal so either way you’d be likely to miss if you don’t match your speeds.