Radiosity or Advanced Lighting

Does anyone know any good tuturiols of Max5 Radiosity or Advanced Lighting… I have been using Brazil for a little bit but i’m not sure if FIRST would like the idea of using Brazil, also I think Brazil would take longer to render…

So, I was just wondering if anyone know how to do Radiosity, LightTracing or Global Illumination…

Thanks
Patrick

The tutorial book that comes with Max gives very good refereneces on how to use all the advanced lighting…

I thought so… i’ll have to get the one from my Adv.Tech Class and look over it… I don’t have the book myself but I can always borrow it :)…

Thanks

I always understood it to be that light tracer was for general use and radiosity is where the most power is at but much harder to get right.
It’s really hard to get things to look right in radiosity especially where objects come together… but it is much more ‘technically’ correct than light tracer

that’s what i thought, at least

Here’s what i learned this year.

  1. radiosity can screw up the animation especially if u have objects moving and the camera is moving. From what i understand, radiosity recalculates the lighting solution every frame which causes inconsistency (i.e. flickers).

  2. light tracer works well on outdoor scenes especially in conjunction with a skylight.

  3. try experimenting with just regular omni lights, i suggest doing this tutorial:
    http://www.michaelscholz.de/neuehomepage/tutorial/tut02_e.html

4)lastly, i storngly recommend going to this site:
http://www.xenomorphic.co.uk/education.htm

Good Luck!

yeah kcy88 is right… unless you turn the quality of the radiosity to insanely high levels you are going to see flicker if you have things moving around

Brazil cuts the time of rendering in 1/3rd of that of MAX scanline, it is also faster than VRAY and Final Render, only if you know what to do with all the settings.

However, as Thetadot has pushed before, it’s best you learn the traditional way of lighting first, even if you may not do it to the full extent, because the settings in some of these advanced renderers expect you to know some light theory.