Robototes Team 2412 CAD Release

Team 2412, The Robototes, is proud to release our 2019 full robot CAD.

Our 60 member team based out of Bellevue, WA is excited to be publicizing our robot for the first time in 12 years, “Raven”! After a record setting year for our team, including 2 Imagery Awards, a Quality Award, a District Finalist Award, and our first ever trip to Houston, we are truly proud of what we put together this year.

To the members of the Bellevue Alliance, teams in the PNW, and the world, it was a pleasure playing with you all.

See you next year!

Pit release coming soon!

Robot Cad: Robot Cad.zip (44.5 MB)

Full SolidWorks CAD model available upon request



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Comp footage: https://youtu.be/aSsRslcWPlQ?t=3

Quality Award:

“A quality robot begins with a well CADded design. This team has that.
Every part, every clip, every latch, every spacer. With this much CAD, you could almost 3D-print the entire robot… and this team did.
Running into walls is usually not good, but this team uses it to their advantage, to start their climb.”

Imagery Award:

“Roses are red, their robot is black
When climbing the HAB, this team did attack.
Their judges laughed at their “climb by yeet
But this team’s branding is tough to beat.
Robot, pit, uniform, business plan too
We couldn’t stop staring at two-four-one-two.”

District Championship Imagery Award:

“Judges don’t normally see CAD used outside robot design
So, they were Raven about this team’s use of imagery
As a design, engineering, and manufacturing training opportunity
This team Red the rules and created a vision to tell their story
The robot, pit, and students were stacked with colors that tie into their theme from front to Black
A little Bird told us that this team has an image that thundered over the rest”

19 Likes

What type of belting did you run on your intake?

1 Like

Great question!

We have 25 H chain running to the first wheel set from the bag motor (28:1). Then 4 (2 on either side) polybelts running to the second wheel set, making sure to reverse it into an infinity pattern, so the wheels run in reverse, to intake or eject together.

The polybelt we used was 1/4 inch hollow polybelt from McMaster. Using 4 gave us a lot of grip, so we could avoid slippage if we were to come across a particularly large cargo. It also made it so if we lost some, it wouldn’t compromise preformace.

I’m assuming this is an 8 wheel WCD, correct me if I’m wrong.
With 3 NEOS a side and an 8 wheel tank style drive, this has to have been amazing defence bot. Wouldn’t surprise me if that’s how you made Houston.

3 Likes

8 wheel tank, 3 NEO’s, drop center, smooth grip. It was built for defense. Has a dual shifting gear box. We don’t plan to play defense, but we prepare to. (Plus anti defense is key)

At both our district events, we were a cargo cycler the whole competition. At PNW district championship, we played defense during playoffs, but only during the playoffs.

At world’s, we played defense once, and was picked up as a 1st pick and we played cargo.

Here’s the defense match we played at world’s. We were defending 294 (the first seed on Robling). We held them to just one cargo and no hatches the entire teliop. https://youtu.be/yHJ8tQkXXw0

3 Likes

Am I wrong or does this robot doesn’t have any ability to collect hatch panels?

Overall pretty cool design! Thanks for sharing!

3 Likes

No, we did not, by the end of the season. We started off the season with a Velcro based hatch panel pick up on the front of our cargo pick-up, but it didn’t work as well as we would have liked, and found that our skill with cargo is much more advantageous.

So, we spent the 2 weeks in between our first and second competition, and re designed it to optimize cargo, and took off hatch ability completely.

Thanks for asking!

1 Like

Is the drivebase frame made of bent sheet metal?

1 Like

The front and back portions is bent, 1/8th inch, sheet metal we waterjeted. The sides are 1x3 inch box, 1/8th inch thick. 1x3 is overkill for most team, 1x2 is usually more appropriate, but we wanted to ensure structural rigidity when doing CBY.

The side box was milled into the lighting pattern. It cut the weight in half, which is a must have, if you’re looking to do a similar drive base. Wrapping up as much weight as we would have, without the lighting pattern, would have been suicide.