Smallest public school to have a team


#1

Hi all,

We were having a discussion at robots tonight. What is the smallest public school you know of that hosts an FRC team?

Ours has an enrollment of 375 and we were wondering if there were any smaller.

Thanks


#2

Dollar Bay High School has about 80 students. 10 are on the robotics team


#3

I think that guy wins… The Math and Science Academy in Minnesota has 315 students total in grades 6-12, with just over a hundred in 9-12. We usually get up to 20 signed up (a good percentage, to start), but we certainly have issues with continued commitment from enough people to really get the job done.


#4

We have 2k+ students, and we can get only 20 to give a solid commitment :frowning:


#5

our school has 1200 students but the team is only 15


#6

I hate to rain on your parade, but please leave the thread to it’s original topic. If you like you may start a new thread; perhaps: “which school has the lowest participation per capita”.

Thanks,

  • Alex

#7

My team is from the smallest public high school in Massachusetts. The first year our team was around the school graduated a class of 57 students.


#8

The size of the graduating class may be a better metric. The Math and Science Academy graduated 31 this year (the largest class ever).


#9

Wow, our team pulls from 2 schools with over 4500 kids. we struggle to get 20-25 to show up consistently. Over the summer, that number goes down to 4-6


#10

We’re a private school, so it doesn’t quite apply to the topic here… but they graduate less than 100 each year (I’m afraid I don’t know the exact number). We still have managed to maintain 20-25 active students on the team every year - we even have 18 of them (9 of which are new members!) showing up for our summer session in a few weeks!


#11

I disagree.
In fact, starting a new thread about an extremely similar topic would be bogging up the forum with superfluous threads. I think that if the OP strongly dislikes that kind of discussion, he will voice it here. But as far as talking about an extremely similar subject, it might as well be done here, because really, theres a 90% chance that the lowest number has already been posted, and thus, the original intent of of this thread has already been taken care of.

P.S.: To the OP: There was a huge “demographics” forum a while back located here.


#12

NCS graduates about 60 kids a year, though this year’s senior class was huge at about 90 students, and the 9th and 8th grades have around 40. We generally get around 25 kids on the team, 15 or so who are super-duper committed.


#13

My teams school is among the smallest (around 500 students max, and graduating class is 80-100 (i think we had 76 this year but that’s about as low as it gets). This was our first year and we had about 20-27 kids on the FIRST team from all different grade levels. during the build season we often felt we were at a disadvantage because teams in larger schools/cities had access to designated machine shops and practice areas, while we created a makeshift workshop in our head mentors classroom, and tested in our school library. we have great support from our school principle, although the lack of a metal shop is not something we can fix at the moment. I’m just curious if other teams from small schools have the same problems as us?


#14

My school has slightly less students than yours (400 to max 450) with 26 on the team. Because of this we are actually at an advantage. Because there are less students in a school designed to hold approximately only 1500 students, the robotics team actually gets more space and room. We currently have 3.5 rooms (machine room, “build room”, cad/business/graphics/website room, storage room is the .5) and a practice area that isn’t permanent but we can use for a few weeks when needed. We also have good support from our principal and certain staff members. So, in our case we aren’t really having similar problems, and I’m sure others would tell you different, but I figured I’d tell my teams story anyway.


#15

our team draws from two high schools (in the same town) that each probably have about 1500 students, and we had a pretty large team this year (for us) of 34 students. During the summer that more than halves, and not all of our members could be classified as “actively involved.”


#16

Dom technically we don’t apply to this discussion, as we are a private school. Just saying. We still are small though.


#17

We draw students from two schools each with around 80 kids in high school. we usually have about 25 students in robotics with around 10 doing most of the work.


#18

We don’t have a dedicated machine shop, either, but that just means we have to budget in cleanup time (about an hour every day we meet) and time to pull stuff from our storage area (time varies, usually 10-20 minutes at the beginning, plus frequent trips to/from). It’s not an enormous disadvantage.


#19

I believe we fit in this pool of smallest public school to have a team.
In Hawaii, we rank almost at the top for smallest public school, especially on Oahu, the island where most schools are.

We are definitely one of the farther schools to get to in a rural part of the island.


#20

Well, we’ve informally claimed the “smallest team from the smallest school” title, but now we see we might not be… we have just over 100 kids in our 4 year HS, and get 5ish committed roboteers. I’m not sure what we’d do with another 15 kids - maybe better community outreach:o))