"The Little Things" - Helpful hints for all

OK,
I have been asked to weigh in on R65 so here goes. Yes, gluing is in violation of this rule (tampering includes … gluing) but I think it is more important to look at the practice and it’s repercussions. Hot glue is ‘HOT’ by nature and the devices you are trying to glue are not. Often the glue does not adhere to the parts in the way you want so you have a false sense of security thinking the parts are secure when they are not. They just have a big blob of useless glue attached to them. Gluing connectors into a speed controller can render the $100+ part useless when someone rips the #24 or #26 wires out of the PWM connector. If the person who is applying the glue gets a little over indulgent, the glue gets down inside the device either damaging parts as it is applied or by holding in heat that otherwise would be dissipated in the atmosphere. Rapid heating and cooling can tear parts from the circuit board. The result is the same, early failure of the internal component. We have allowed teams to perform their own repairs on electrical parts but gluing parts to them makes repairs almost impossible. As I say to people all the time, “Think for a minute and I bet you will come up with a better idea.” We mount everything on perf stock. It is easy to work and all of our parts simply tie wrap to the stock. For PWM cables, we take the wire down to the deck and tie it in place. The tension holds the connector in place and a pair of wire cutters will remove both the connector and controller in the event of a failure. Gluing also makes it almost impossible to reuse the parts next year.
My Murphy’s Law corollary is “Something will always go wrong at the worst possible time, on Einstein.” You want to win and that means being able to change failed devices quickly. As posted earlier, we use quick connect tabs on our controllers. These are available in boxes of 100 from Digikey. So no other tools but a wire cutter is needed to change out a controller and you will have no dropped screws to look for. If everything is labeled (using colored tape or with real labels) then there is no thought needed to swap out a suspect part be it electrical mechanical or pneumatic.