The Robonauts 118-Everybot


#1

The Robonauts Everybot, with a final budget of $1000, is an affordable, robust, and simplistic robot that can be built with nothing but basic tools and items found in either the kit of parts, purchased from your local hardware store, or FRC retailer such as Andymark and VEXPro.

In our analysis of FIRST Power Up, we’ve found that a short list of robot capabilities will define a robot capable of playing in a regional finals match or have a place on an alliance at a championship. We stuck to the most valuable and basic scoring tasks.

The 2018 Robonauts Everybot Robot Will:

· Deposit cubes in the exchange

· Place cubes on a switch

· Accept cubes from the portal

· Be able to be lifted by an alliance partner for climb points

· Cross the auto line during autonomous

After build week 1, a short video, CAD, and documentation of how we built Everybot will be posted here.


#2

Sounds like a solid plan! Can’t wait to check it out.


#3

We’re proud to present the 2018 Robonauts Everybot:

Stay tuned for a bill-of-materials, CAD, and a guide showing how we built Everybot.


#4

Cool.
You forgot to state that it can solo levitate! :smiley:
Definitely can be a vault filler.


#5

That is so cool for low cost teams


#6

Not only easy for low-resource teams, but DOMINANT at the away switch. That robot was running 5s cycles during thefirst Power-Up matches this weekend, twice as fast as the ground pickup robots were running. At that speed, a bucket-style everybot could hold the away switch for more than 30s until the portal(s) are emptied.

Seeing those bucket-bots go makes me very worried about our strategy (and very excited about Power-Up in general).


#7

Great work guys! Good to see GP working for those teams that can’t afford those costly and expensive parts to build a competitive robot!


#8

So we now know what the Robonauts want as their second pick…


#9

I don’t know if this is a jab at them, but I wouldn’t speculate what they will do. No one knows at this point in build season. Seems they just wanted to help out the CD/FIRST community and have teams that would have an otherwise hard time competing without a little help, be able to compete.

Note: If that last sentence sounds condescending in any way please do not take it that way, wasn’t meant to be. :smiley:


#10

#TSIMFD


#11

The simplicity and effectiveness of this robot is beautiful. It’s a strategic design masterpiece. I hope we see some teams employ this type of design.


#12

I’m worried the refs could count it as “launching”


#13

It performed well enough that it could be the first pick of one of the lower ranked Alliances at some events.

Their intent is to help such teams learn to walk properly first, before they learn to run. It is a basic robot designed by a top-tier team so it is very well thought out. The students running it said they didn’t use any tools or equipment that a rookie team would not have access to. Many of the brackets are easily available from a local hardware store.


#14

Every Rookie team needs to see this.


#15

…which is legal.


#16

I’m predicting that we’ll see this type of bot on Einstein.


#17

Only if you are touching the fence, there is a lot of room for error where you could get a penalty, especially when you are driving from across the field and have limited vision.


#18

Eh, fences are pretty good for smashing up on. Doubles as a nice way to line up and make sure you’re square.


#19

Lol not a jab or meant to be taken seriously at all


#20

Yeah I still expect a lot of people to get called for it though.