Triple Helix 2363 - 2022 robot reveal video

It’s been a long couple years. Here’s the current state of the Triple Helix 2022 competition bot, Genome Nu. Thanks to the Everybot for their fantastic climber design.

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Neat! I really dig how simple and clever each subsystem is. Was the flip up passive climb the goal from the beginning or something that was pivoted to later? I take it the decision to make the pivot plate articulate was to allow unrestricted access to the climbing zone during the match?

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I always say the best robot reveals are the ones that make you question “why didn’t I think of that?” This is that 100% for me, I love the intake, topspin launcher, and honestly just about everything about this, it’s so clean and well-built!

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Can we take a moment and realize how CLEAN that robot shoots? Holy cow the top spin and the adjustment abality for it is insane… Also the swerve drive is smooth agile!

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Thanks! It didn’t make it into the release video, but the hood wraps past vertical so we can shoot from one side of the bot with bottom spin and the other side with top spin. We’ll see which works better when we can test with regulation field elements.

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Let me add my sincere thanks to the Everybot team for providing such a great resource!

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With a roster of students smaller than half of recent seasons, we knew we didn’t have the resources for a complicated climber. Our plan was a fast, low goal climber using ramps. The Everybot climber gave us a low resource path to the middle bar without significant extra climbing time.

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Yep. It eliminates one of the inherent disadvantages of the Everybot climber.

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Beautiful robot.
Are you worried at all about blocking-based defense, or do you think the swerve drive will help you avoid that?

Looking good Todd! All the best from your friends on 190.

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Worried isn’t quite the right word. We consider it a risk to be mitigated. A nimble swerve drive is definitely part of that mitigation strategy.

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Awesome work guys! That auto is :fire: :fire: :fire:

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Looks great!

I’ve seen the cloudy polycarbonate on a few robots. Does it offer some kind of advantage or is it purely aesthetic?

Does it come cloudy or is that something you do?

It’s purely aesthetic. You hand sand with scotch-brite pads.

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Interesting. It’s something we’ve been considering so we don’t have to worry about scratches

I personally am partial to the “battle damaged” look a lexan bot gets after being in competitions. Each scratch usually has a good story behind it. I’m continually amused by how a bot can come back from a match with big gashes and damaged structural parts, but no penalties assessed against the bots doing the damage. Early on it made me pretty mad, but now I accept it as just part of the game. Take it as a given that defender robots are going to be rampaging around inside your frame perimeter, and mitigate the risk of crippling damage to your bot. If those mitigations are designed to clearly highlight the rule breaking play of your opponents, so much the better. It’s against the rules to force your opponents to commit penalties, but if they are damaging your bot there’s nothing wrong with highlighting that fact to the refs.

We had some team members, however, who liked the frosted look, so we did that to some of the lexan panels this year.