What Teams did awesome things with software this past season

Seems like a lot of teams, particularly the nationally competitive teams put out their past season’s source code.

From looking through build releases, or by talking about your own team… what cool things did you see done with software on this years game? Or just interesting things.

Would love to hear what people have found!

971’s control systems are always miles ahead anyone else. They fully embrace modern control theory (things like LQR instead of PID), and have a really sophisticated code structure implementing memory sharing and a lot of concurrency. Lots of clever little features as well, like how they implement sensor zeroing. You can see the clear effects of everything they do in how smoothly and elegantly their robots drive and move, whether it’s an elevator or a giant arm.

2 Likes

Did they post their source somewhere? I’d love to see it

You can find the software from right before the season at http://frc971.org/content/2018-software. Hopefully we’ll get around to releasing the 2019 software sometime soonish.

3 Likes

Looking forward to seeing what kind of things y’all did with all that camera input in your 2019 code

A few kind of cool things with Xbox controllers and the rumble feature. One was my old team that I competed on in 2019. We had a “climber mode” where the operator could then go in and manually move the climber legs (there was no auto climb). To enter this mode, the operator had to press y so that they didn’t accidentally climb in the middle of the match. If they attempted to climb without being in climber mode, the controller would vibrate to remind them to enter climber mode. There was never a case when we didn’t climb for a lack of being in climber mode :slight_smile:

The other examples are for my current team. We have a rollybeak style collector that when I pull in a hatch, it will vibrate when I’ve got a secure grip on it. This can help a lot in low visibility situations when other bots may be blocking my view of the HP station, and does a really nice job of reassuring me I have the hatch.

The final thing is for our climb. We have a suction climb, and when the pressure switch tells us that we have a secure seal on the platform, my controller will vibrate so I can tell the operator it’s time to climb. It’s just a nice little check that can help make sure we don’t climb before the robots ready.

I think that for teams that use Xbox controller in any capacity, the rumble is a really good feature that can help give the drive team cues about what’s happening with the robot without taking their eyes off the field to look at the dashboard.

1 Like