Wildstang Video!

Posted by aTm at 2/16/2001 10:17 PM EST

Student on team #111, Wildstang, from Wheeling High School and Motorola.

Check it out!

aTm

Posted by Travis Covington at 2/16/2001 10:35 PM EST

Student on team #115, MV ROBOTICS, from Monta Vista High School and Hitachi Data Systems - 3com - NASA Ames.

In Reply to: Wildstang Video!
Posted by aTm on 2/16/2001 10:17 PM EST:

“speechless”

Posted by Joe Johnson at 2/16/2001 10:48 PM EST

Engineer on team #47, Chief Delphi, from Pontiac Central High School and Delphi Automotive Systems.

In Reply to: Re: Wildstang Video!
Posted by Travis Covington on 2/16/2001 10:35 PM EST:

Wow. I was totally unprepared for this video.

WildStang…

…I think I LOVE you!

Well done, as usual.

Joe J.

Posted by Mr. X at 2/17/2001 12:06 AM EST

Other from VT.

In Reply to: Wildstang Video!
Posted by aTm on 2/16/2001 10:17 PM EST:

Very Nice Wildstang… perfection accomplished yet again, but then again you’ll hear that from everyone else besides me

1 question, wheres the light? I thought it had to be visible from 360 degrees of motion?

X-man

Posted by Mike Soukup at 2/17/2001 12:56 AM EST

Engineer on team #111, Wildstang, from Rolling Meadows & Wheeling and Motorola.

In Reply to: Very Nice, wheres the light?
Posted by Mr. X on 2/17/2001 12:06 AM EST:

I’m not sure if they’ve put the light in yet (I skipped tonight’s meeting to go see the Hawks destroy the Blues), but it’s going inside the robot. Even if you don’t have a direct view, you can easilly see the reflections off the aluminum. We tested it and it looks really sweet.

And no, it’s not perfect yet, but we’re working hard on getting it there.

Mike

Posted by Ken Leung at 2/17/2001 5:21 AM EST

Student on team #192, Gunn Robotics Team, from Henry M. Gunn Senior High School.

In Reply to: you mean on top isn’t a good idea?
Posted by Mike Soukup on 2/17/2001 12:56 AM EST:

How can you not call that perfect…!!!

I’ve been starring at the photos for nights already, thinking it can’t get any better than that.

And yet, when the video is out, I was simply shocked. I mean, I was sitting there totally unexpected of any surprised, and suddenly found this link to the video.

While I was watching the video, it seems like I can’t feel the outside world anymore. All I can see in front of me is the thin little ramp thing sitting there raising and lowering the bridge, and it seems to become ONE with the bridge itself. Then, when the screen start counting “points scored”, everything else just blacked out in front of me.

Wow! I must say, it’s much thinner than I thought. And much more shiny too. Amazing!

P.S. turns out some of my predictions are right.

Posted by Wayne Cokeley at 2/17/2001 8:18 AM EST

Coach on team #25, Raider Robotix, from North Brunswick Twp. H.S., North Brunswick, NJ and Bristol Myers Squibb.

In Reply to: Wildstang Video!
Posted by aTm on 2/16/2001 10:17 PM EST:

: Check it out!

:
: aTm

Definitely outside the box. Truly a unique idea and one to be proud of. Now if your alliance partners can get the goals in order and ready to be balanced in less than 2 minutes it would be terrific…

Posted by Hannah at 03/09/2001 7:30 PM EST

Student on team #126, Gael Force, from Clinton High School and NYPRO.

In Reply to: the west coast name…
Posted by Ken Leung on 03/09/2001 6:49 AM EST:

calling them bar-locks is more of an ideal… a way of life than an actual name… Now go waste a day trying to figure that statement out.

Posted by Raul at 2/21/2001 7:49 AM EST

Engineer on team #111, Wildstang, from Rolling Meadows & Wheeling HS and Motorola.

In Reply to: the most complex one?
Posted by Ken Leung on 2/17/2001 11:49 PM EST:

I guess I measure complexity in a different way. It does look very simple - but looks are misleading.

It has about twice as many unique parts as any other robot we have made. All mechanisims had to be fit in a slim package to maintain a smooth top. The drive system uses 2 driven holonomic wheels (4 wheel drive power with 2 wheel drive turning capability). It has a gear box just to drive a pot to feedback the position of the bridge lifter. It uses the photosensors to determine if we are close enough and parallel to the bridge (requried since it is hard to see where it is over the bridge). And in general, there are many new mechanisims that we never designed in the past (risky design as you said). And my most important measure of complexity - the amount of sleep I had to give up to architect and integrate this design!

Raul

Posted by Jason Morrella at 2/17/2001 10:18 AM EST

Coach on team #254, Cheesy Poofs, from Bellarmine College Prep & others and NASA Ames/Cypress Semiconductor/Unity Care.

In Reply to: Wildstang Video!
Posted by aTm on 2/16/2001 10:17 PM EST:

Oh my.
I don’t know if they will be dreams or nightmares (depends on if they’re on our alliance in them) - but I am sure they will contain Wildstang & that mesmerizing (or haunting) music.
Oh my (I keep repeating to myself)

Much too late & much too tired to have seen that right now. Anyway - Raul, Mike, & the rest of the Wildstang bunch…WOW…(any other words would be underestimating how impressive your machine is).

Congratulations.

(I’m really looking forward to seeing a few of the Bay Area robots this weekend and hearing about the SoCal & Arizona Bots from the Chatsworth scrimmage)

Posted by David Kelly at 03/09/2001 9:08 PM EST

Student on team #234, Cyber Blue, from Perry Meridian High School [IUPUI] and Rolls-Royce/NASA KSC/ NEC/ Trilithic/ Peregrine/.

I am uploading some pictures of the KSC Competition onto CB Team 234’s webpage right now. Check it out!!

David Kelly
Student Captain/ Webmaster
Team 234

Winners of the 2001 Delphi “Driving Tomorrows Technology Award” at NASA KSC for our NEW & INNOVATIVE Control arm

Posted by Shawn McMahon at 2/18/2001 1:32 PM EST

Student on team #263, Aftershock, from Sachem H.S. and Symbol, Citycorp., Apoge, CA …

In Reply to: Wildstang Video!
Posted by aTm on 2/16/2001 10:17 PM EST:

How exactly do you get the forklift type device under the ramp? I thought the metal strip on the end was flush with the floor. Did you sharpen it and just push down on the carpet a little? I would have liked picking up the ramp like that, but was afraid of variations in the competition ramp inhibiting us from doing that. We use the handles on the sides instead. Very impressive though. How does the second robot on top of the ramp know when they are balanced before you remove you clamp type device? OK, so I guess that was more than 1 question…

Posted by Raul at 2/21/2001 8:00 AM EST

Engineer on team #111, Wildstang, from Rolling Meadows & Wheeling HS and Motorola.

In Reply to: One question
Posted by Shawn McMahon on 2/18/2001 1:32 PM EST:

The answers follow you questions below:

: How exactly do you get the forklift type device under the ramp? I thought the metal strip on the end was flush with the floor. Did you sharpen it and just push down on the carpet a little?

A: We use a HDPE “spatula” that does compress the carpet fibers down enough to scoop the edge. I was concerned about this as well; but our experiments proved it was easier than we thought.

How does the second robot on top of the ramp know when they are balanced before you remove you clamp type device?

A: We have sensors on the bridge lifter that can feel pressure on the top and bottom holders. SW is used to automatically set the lifter to a position that can sense the balance and feed it back to the control box once the robot gets off the bridge and waits on top of us. Also, in the scrimmage we had on Sunday, we found it easy to visually set the goals in the right spots to balance the bridge. When using the sensor we never found we had to ask the robot to go back and move the goals.

Raul