WindRiver "System Clock Has Been Set Back"

At one point a few weeks ago, my friends thought it would be funny to set my system clock to something ridiculous. Ever since then, despite having corrected the mistake and setting the clock to the right time, WindRiver 2014 has not been running. Every time I open it, I get the error:

System clock has been set back.
Feature: WR_WORKBENCH
License path: C:\WindRiver\license\zwrsLicense.lic
FLEXIm error: -88,309

It has been horrible, as I have been unable to compile any code on my laptop. I have tried reinstalling windriver after deleting the whole WindRiver directory, and when that didn’t work, I reinstalled using the original disks. It still doesn’t work, and I would like a solution.

Thanks,
Shah

I can’t help with the solution, but I DO hope you harass your “friends” for screwing you over like that.

You could download VirtualBox and install it on a virtual machine.

I actually considered that, but for whatever reason, vm’s run poorly on my computer (i7-3610QM, 8GB RAM, GT 630M, Windows 7), and there are multiple programs I would have to install for the files to be able to easily move in and out, and I had decided that the hassle + slowness made it a bad solution.

And as for the revenge, I already exacted it.

Did you try to uninstall the re-install Wind River? The license manager thinks you were trying to circumvent the license terms. You’ll never get it to work again w/o assistance from Wind River.

To uninstall, I’d try a 3rd party uninstaller (like Revo) that will actually dig through your registry and delete anything and everything it can find that would possibly stop Wind River from “remembering” that it’s been installed before.

Try searching your filesystem for files having a future date. The license manager probably created one in an unobvious spot when the clock was misadjusted, and now it thinks you’re trying to subvert an expiring license by setting the clock to the past. I’ve seen people hint at having stopped the “FLEXlm -88” error by deleting any such files.

To me this situation mostly sounds like a good lesson in why open source software exists. :smiley:

+1 on that. Revo is great-- it digs in deep and finds ever trace of whatever you’re uninstalling, whether it wants to be removed or not.

So I tried using the freeware version of Revo, and it didn’t recognize WindRiver as installed. When I used hunter mode, it claimed that this program had never been installed, and I should contact the makers for help. I think this is because IDEs and the like are really just .exes, and they never really install into the system, just decompress. But either way, that provided little help, and the program still doesn’t work. And I searched through C:\WindRiver, and I couldn’t find any files from the future, they were all dated from my latest install.

You said you had deleted everything from that folder, so I wouldn’t expect to find the special file there. Do a search through the entire drive. Keep in mind that you might be looking for a hidden file.

Just wondering, is there a way to quickly find all files within a particular folder/drive? Or would I have to manually find all of the files, one by one?

EDIT: Also, maybe worth noting, just organizing the folders within C: show that their last edit was from a reasonable time ago, from a few weeks to a few months, so…

I won’t comment on how quickly it works, but Windows has a file search feature. How you use it depends on which version of Windows you have. Just tell it to look in all folders for files modified after tomorrow.

I’m very sorry for taking a long time to respond, just had family problems and first week of school and all.

Okay, I searched it out, I found only one file made after tomorrow, it was a chrome file I deleted. WindRiver still didn’t work, so I reinstalled it, and it still doesn’t work. I honestly can’t figure this out, and I would really like the help, because I need to be able to use my computer.

Okay, I got the issue fixed. I don’t know if this is the right way to do it, but this is what I did.

Step 1: Use windows file manager to find any files made after tomorrow. If not important, delete them. If important, open them up and save them again or copy into a new file to get the date fixed.

Step 2: Delete WindRiver. Use the uninstallers if you want, I don’t see that they made a huge difference.

Step 3: Use regedit to find a Windriver folder in your registry. It should have about 2 files, both of which are registry related. Delete it. Continue to search your registry. You will find one registry entry clearly marked as the WindRiver license manager. Delete it.

Step 4(Don’t know if this helps, but…): Clear your cache and then restart. You may be hit by some notes saying your registry is being repaired. That’s okay.

Step 5: Reinstall WindRiver. Use default directories and don’t restart after the 3.0 installation.

Step 7: PROFIT!

Okay, I got the issue fixed. I don’t know if this is the right way to do it, but this is what I did.

Step 1: Use windows file manager to find any files made after tomorrow. If not important, delete them. If important, open them up and save them again or copy into a new file to get the date fixed.

Step 2: Delete WindRiver. Use the uninstallers if you want, I don’t see that they made a huge difference.

Step 3: Use regedit to find a Windriver folder in your registry. It should have about 2 files, both of which are registry related. Delete it. Continue to search your registry. You will find one registry entry clearly marked as the WindRiver license manager. Delete it.

Step 4(Don’t know if this helps, but…): Clear your cache and then restart. You may be hit by some notes saying your registry is being repaired. That’s okay.

Step 5: Reinstall WindRiver. Use default directories and don’t restart after the 3.0 installation.

Step 7: PROFIT!

/thread

I’m sorry for not telling you to clean out the WindRiver stuff from Windows registry in the first place. That’s one of the first places to look for persistent license data. I thought I read that you had done that already before I gave my first suggestion, but I must have imagined it.

What did you do for revenge?

Yeah, no, its okay. I got it fixed in the end, and I have frc toolchain set up on my computer now so I have a backup solution regardless.

As to what I did for revenge, well… Our school uses iPads. So, during robotics, the two culprits who did this mysteriously had their iPads drained to empty… repeatedly. They weren’t using them or anything, they just… died. Also, upon awakening, the iPads were found to be filled with 1000s of photos of a desk.

If you actually want to know what happened, I just set their brightness to max, bluetooth on, set them to constantly ping for Wi-Fi, and then placed it on a desk and repeatedly mashed the volume buttons within the camera app until the iPads died/utterly crashed. Believe me, we have used iPads with bad batteries, so it doesn’t take long.

I find it interesting that people are inclined to take it out on your friends, rather than Wind River and Flexera.

The bug you encountered is likely a flailing attempt at prevent a user from circumventing the licence term by changing system dates. The FlexLM licence management software notices that the date has changed: “Shut. Down. Everything.” You’d think that Flexera would be capable of a more nuanced response, such as the one Microsoft has been using in case of activation failures for what—15 years?

And although you got it for free, this is also commercial software that people depend on to get their work done. Doesn’t it seem rather negligent to have such a simple thing force a customer to spend hours dealing with it? Wind River should have caught that in quality assurance, and leaned on Flexera to stop it from happening.

(I realize that there may be business decisions that drive them to operate this way, but that doesn’t make it any less irresponsible.)