WPA Key?

We need a WPA Key to configure the D-Link. What is that WPA Key?

The key can be whatever you want as long as it is programmed on both the classmate end and the robot bridge. FIRST recommend using <team number>WPAKEY. So for my team, 3096, we would use 3096WPAKEY.

FIRST details how to set the up in thier “How to Configure Your Radio” document at http://www.usfirst.org/uploadedFiles/Robotics_Programs/FRC/Game_and_Season__Info/2011_Assets/Kit_of_Parts/How_to_Configure_Your_Radio.pdf

In reality, I had a hard time getting the encryption set-up and for shop use I skipped it am running un-encrypted. You bridge will be encrypted by the event staff at your competitions. You will have to take it back off when you get back to the shop to use the robot there.

Hope this helps.

We did what you ve told us but in the network settings when we change “IP Address” and the other stuff like in the manual and save it we see an error on the screen. I dont really understand why is that happening?

A picture or description of the error would go a long way towards diagnosing the problem.

When I click on save what I dont understand after a while the page directs to log out.And after that it gives the error and it says the page you are looking for cannot be displayed.

That is normal after you change the IP address. Your computer still has a 192.x.y.51 address, the D-LINK has a 10.x.y.4 address, so they don’t talk to each other… yet.

Continue on with the next step which should be changing your computer’s IP address to 10.x.y.51, switch the d-link to AP mode and type the IP address of the dlink into your browser.

This is because you changed the IP of the bridge, so it doesn’t match the IP of your computer anymore - therefore, they can’t communicate.

As soon as this error page shows up, change your computer’s IP address to the IP address you just set the bridge to, then reload the page. You should be able to see it then.

Speaking of this, I was not very happy with the documentation this year. There are large gaps in the documentation from a system standpoint. For example, it’s great that it tells you how to set up the bridge, but there is no documentation explaining how to set up the driver’s station computer to talk to the bridge.

There’s a distinct lack of “why”, but the “what” and “how” seem quite complete to me.

For example, it’s great that it tells you how to set up the bridge, but there is no documentation explaining how to set up the driver’s station computer to talk to the bridge.

That’s probably because you’re not intended to use the Driver Station to talk to the bridge.

Team Update #5 hints at a new radio setup document, but I didn’t see it there.

The How to Setup Your Radio document is terrible.
Short but terrible.
It has all the right information, but jumbled in the wrong order.

It starts with a procedure for competition that I find it hard to believe we will ever use, but maybe I’ll just be disappointed to be back on the 2009 WEP help desk.

It misleads people into thinking you need encryption at home, but doesn’t give directions for that.

Thanks for your helps I have done the configuration of the radio.

It’s up now.

If the driver station doesn’t talk to the bridge, then how does the robot get the joystick commands? Somewhere along the way the data from the driver station needs to get to the robot (and vice versa).

When not at a competition event, the Driver Station connects wirelessly to the DAP-1522 router in Access Point mode. I would have expected you to know that already, and I am not sure why you asked.

When at a competition event, the Driver Station connects to the field system using a wired Ethernet cable. The DAP-1522 connects wirelessly to the field network in Bridge mode.

The Driver Station “talks to the bridge” by going through the virtual network provided by the field system, but it never knows anything explicitly about the bridge.

I’m pretty sure Chris was asking a rhetorical question. It was the question of the Driver Station talking to the bridge or the Driver Station talking to the Bridge in Access Point mode.

I completely agree. The new Radio Configuration document helps a little for some teams I’m sure but it needs a lot of work. I don’t know why they did it this way compared to last year’s documentation, which was pretty awesome really.

Yes, what David said.

My point is this: when our students set up the radio as explained in the document, our driver station would not communicate with the robot (either in bridge mode OR access point mode). There are a number of missing steps in the documentation that were needed to get it to communicate.

The new Rev A document has a better order of operations.
It shows both without & with Security set.
“with” gets a warning to put the same Passkey on your laptop, but leaves you to figure out how if you want to do that.

It puts the Competition settings at the end and notes that they are for reference only and the standard kiosk will do all the work at events. Remember, After the event to turn the D-Link security off when yiu switch it back o AP mode (or for you security buffs, resect the passkey).

I still advise my teams to leave the security off to simplify settings. They don’t have a lot of network folks on the teams.

That’s a very confusing set of words to string together. Access Point mode and Bridge mode are mutually exclusive. It’s a little like asking about how to light the pilot on a dual-mode RV refrigerator when powering it from a battery instead of using propane.

Really? After we followed the instructions exactly as written, ours worked immediately (well, after giving it a minute to boot, anyway). What extra steps did you have to do?

Sorry for the confusion - I got used to calling the robot side radio “the bridge”.

To get the wireless communication going, we had to logout of the Driver login, log in as Developer, set the WPA key, get the classmate to find the robot network, log out of Developer, then log back in as Driver.

Yeah, the WGA last year was only a bridge. The DAP this year is a full-blown router that can be switched between bridge and Access Point modes. I usually call it the “robot radio”, but when I’m feeling especially pedantic I say “router”.

To get the wireless communication going, we had to logout of the Driver login, log in as Developer, set the WPA key, get the classmate to find the robot network, log out of Developer, then log back in as Driver.

That suggests to me that you did more to the router than the instructions said to do. Specifically, you probably entered a WPA key when doing the Access Point configuration. The new setup document shows exactly how to do that if you want to, but it’s not in the original instructions.

(I’m surprised that the Classmate didn’t pop up a window asking for the key when it tried to connect to the Access Point, but it might just be my Macintosh background leading me to expect such helpful behavior. I don’t have a lot of experience with Windows networking.)